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  • 1
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    A Matter of Conscience James Bartleman Canada
    9781459741126 Paperback FICTION / Native American & Aboriginal On Sale Date: May 12, 2018
    $24.99 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1 in | 272 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y A J. Patrick Boyer Book
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A novel of love and betrayal dealing with the biggest issues facing Canada’s Indigenous peoples today.

      In the summer of 1972, a float plane carrying a team of child welfare officials lands on a river flowing through the Yellow Dog Indian reserve. Their mission is to seize the twin babies of an Indigenous couple as part of an illegal scheme cooked up by the federal government to adopt out tens of thousands of Native children to white families. The baby girl, Brenda, is adopted and raised by a white family in Orillia.

      Meanwhile, that same summer, a baby boy named Greg is born to a white middle-class family. At the age of eighteen, Greg leaves home for the first time to earn money to help pay for his university expenses. He drinks heavily and becomes embroiled in the murder of a female student from a residential school.

      The destinies of Brenda and Greg intersect in this novel of passion, confronting the murder and disappearance of Indigenous women and the infamous Sixties Scoop.
      Bio
      James Bartleman is the former lieutenant governor of Ontario and the bestselling author of the novels As Long as the Rivers Flow and The Redemption of Oscar Wolf. A member of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, he is also a retired ambassador, an officer of the Order of Canada, and winner of the Aboriginal Achievement Award. He lives in Perth, Ontario.
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      Awards
      Reviews
      James Bartleman, a First Nation person himself, writes movingly … about the tragic reality of misogynistic racism and violence against Indigenous women and girls.
      Forces us to confront uncomfortable truths as we seek a path to reconciliation.
      Graphically brings alive the horrific consequences of the removal of Indigenous children from their families and communities.
      The novel may serve as an accessible entry point for readers interested in learning about this traumatic chapter in North American history.
      Bartleman’s strength as a writer is his compassion. He respects each of his characters and sets the stage for real-world discussions of Canada’s past, present, and future.
      As Bartleman succeeded in educating me on this grim piece of history, A Matter of Conscience is a moving piece of literature and a must-read.
  • 2
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    Dr. Oronhyatekha Security, Justice, and Equality Keith Jamieson Canada, Michelle A. Hamilton Canada
    9781459706637 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional On Sale Date: November 05, 2016
    $26.99 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.86 in | 368 pages Carton Quantity: 24 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
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      Description
      2016 Ontario Historical Society Joseph Brant Award — Winner • 2017 Speaker's Book Award — Shortlisted
      A man of two cultures in an era where his only choices were to be a trailblazer or get left by the wayside

      Dr. Oronhyatekha (“Burning Sky”), born in the Mohawk nation on the Six Nations of the Grand River territory in 1841, led an extraordinary life, rising to prominence in medicine, sports, politics, fraternalism, and business. He was one of the first Indigenous physicians in Canada, the first to attend Oxford University, a Grand River representative to the Prince of Wales during the 1860 royal tour, a Wimbledon rifle champion, the chairman of the Grand General Indian Council of Ontario, and Grand Templar of the International Order of Good Templars. He counted among his friends some of the most powerful people of the day, including John A. Macdonald and Theodore Roosevelt. He successfully challenged the racial criteria of the Independent Order of Foresters to become its first non-white member and ultimately its supreme chief ranger.

      At a time when First Nations peoples struggled under assimilative government policy and society’s racial assumptions, his achievements were remarkable.

      Oronhyatekha was raised among a people who espoused security, justice, and equality as their creed. He was also raised in a Victorian society guided by God, honour, and duty. He successfully interwove these messages throughout his life, and lived as a man of significant accomplishments in both worlds.
      Bio
      Keith Jamieson, a Mohawk of the Six Nations of the Grand River, has worked extensively as an ethno-historian, a curator of museum exhibits, and an adjunct professor and guest lecturer internationally. He has written extensively, including exhibit catalogues and commentaries for news media. He lives in Ohsweken, Ontario.

      Michelle A. Hamilton is director of public history at the University of Western Ontario and the award-winning author of Collections and Objections: Aboriginal Material Culture in Southern Ontario. Hamilton is a specialist in nineteenth-century Canada, including indigenous history and colonial relations. She lives in London, Ontario.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ontario Historical Society Joseph Brant Award 2016, Winner
      Speaker's Book Award 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews
      This biography is about one of the most interesting men in Canadian history about whom little is known, and it thus fills an important gap.
      With their detailed biography of this giant of Canadian history, Jamieson and Hamilton have done an enormous favour both for aboriginals and non-aboriginals living on this piece of geography currently known as Canada.
      Puts forward a convincing argument that there is much for us to learn from Dr. Oronhyatekha’s life. Though there is little doubt that he lived an exceptional life, Jamieson and Hamilton’s interpretation instills a vision of late nineteenth-century Ontario few other books can convey. This was a place where Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabe individuals continued to wield influence, and maintained an important presence.
  • 3
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    Invisible North The Search for Answers on a Troubled Reserve Alexandra Shimo Canada
    9781459722927 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs On Sale Date: September 17, 2016
    $24.99 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.5 in | 176 pages Carton Quantity: 72 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A vivid first-person account of life on a troubled reserve that illuminates a difficult and oft-ignored history.

      Globe and Mail 100: Best Books of 2016 • The Hill Times: Best Books of 2016 • 2017 RBC Taylor Prize — Longlisted • 2017 BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction — Shortlisted • 2016 Speaker's Book Award — Shortlisted

      When freelance journalist Alexandra Shimo arrives in Kashechewan, a fly-in, northern Ontario reserve, to investigate rumours of a fabricated water crisis and document its deplorable living conditions, she finds herself drawn into the troubles of the reserve. Unable to cope with the desperate conditions, she begins to fall apart.

      A moving tribute to the power of hope and resilience, Invisible North is an intimate portrait of a place that pushes everyone to their limits. Part memoir, part history of the Canadian reserves, Shimo offers an expansive exploration and unorthodox take on many of the First Nation issues that dominate the news today, including the suicide crises, murdered and missing indigenous women and girls, Treaty rights, Native sovereignty, and deep poverty.
      Bio
      Alexandra Shimo is a broadcaster and former editor at Maclean’s. An award-winning journalist, she is the co-author of Up Ghost River, winner of the CBC Bookie and Speaker’s Book Awards for non-fiction. She lives in Toronto.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      RBC Taylor Prize 2017, Long-listed
      BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction 2017, Short-listed
      Speaker's Book Award 2016, Short-listed
      Dewey Diva Picks 2016, Commended
      Reviews
      ? [A] gripping first-person account of … the brutal conditions that are daily life for many First Nations communities in Canada... A necessary contribution to addressing age-old wrongs.
      It’s very rare that a book will make you shake your head and drop your jaw.… There are horror stories documented in these pages, and some of resilience and courage. The author went down the rabbit hole and showed us the many problems this thing called civilization can cause.
      Alexandra Shimo’s investigative reporting shines much-needed light on the Third-World poverty and despair in First Nations communities that few Canadians are aware of and even fewer have experienced.
      In its heartbreaking and vivid imagery, this book provides an intimate portrait of the harms done to our people and our resilience and strength. I hope it provides a wake-up call for Canadians and a vehicle for social change.
      Investigative journalism at its best… Anyone who wants to know this country needs to see Kashechewan as depicted in Alexandra Shimo’s vivid and gripping account.
      With remarkable economy and insight, Shimo details the past and present injustices that underlie our nation’s greatest failing. The result is a clear-eyed and compassionate call to action.
      An indictment of Canada’s abysmal relations with its First Nations people, a triage of our systematic racism, and a detailed dismantling of every lazily upheld cliché about daily life on a reserve.
      Accessible and smart … her authentic voice is both informative and challenging.
      In late 2005, the First Nation reserve of Kashechewan, Ontario, showed signs of E. coli. The provincial and federal response forms one strand of Alexandra Shimo’s Invisible North: The Search for Answers on a Troubled Reserve. A second follows the reason that reporters, in town to investigate, were duped with “tap water” that was actually dirty river water. Shimo arrives to follow both threads: how was public health allowed to degrade, and who switched the samples? What she finds is chaos: in a reserve gutted by colonialism and church condoned sexual predation; in a country where Native sovereignty conveniently absolves responsibility; and in Shimo herself. That last element, her unravelling mental and physical ability to withstand Kash’s horrors, lifts the book from whodunit into something achingly poignant for all Canadians.
      A must-read for every Canadian.
      Recommend[ed] to anyone who is interested in the plight of Canada's Indigenous peoples.
  • 4
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    Ukkusiksalik The People's Story David F. Pelly Canada
    9781459729896 Hardcover HISTORY / Native American On Sale Date: January 23, 2016
    $35.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 288 pages Carton Quantity: 22 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The remarkable history of a pocket of the remote Arctic, and the oral testimony from the last Inuit elders to live there.

      A coastal region of rolling tundra just west of Hudson Bay, Ukkusikslaik was established as a national park in 2003. In earlier times this historic region was the principal hunting ground for several Inuit families and was criss-crossed by missionaries, Mounties, and traders. Since the 1980s, Arctic writer and researcher David F. Pelly has been exploring this region on foot and by sea-kayak, and with Inuit friends, while documenting Inuit traditional knowledge of the land. In this book, he presents the stories of Inuit elders and includes historical records to provide a complete history of this extraordinary corner of our northern landscape, Ukkusiksalik.
      Bio

      David F. Pelly is an explorer of the North’s cultural landscape and author of several books and articles on the land and its people, including The Old Way North, Sacred Hunt, and Thelon: A River Sanctuary. Much of his writing is based on oral history shared with him by Inuit elders. In 2012, he was awarded the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee medal in recognition of his long-standing efforts to preserve Inuit oral history and traditional knowledge. After many years living in the Arctic, he now lives in the woods near Ottawa.

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      Awards
      Reviews
      In this book, Pelly weaves together stories from Inuit elders with historical accounts to provide the complete history of Ukkusiksalik. The reader sees a new way of seeing the world through the oral traditions of telling stories through the generations for centuries.
      What I take away from this volume...is the rich and layered and often quite stories from the elders, talking to us over the arc of decades about a time that, for all practical purposes, no longer exists in Canada. That these stories, most often passed on by oral traditions have been collected and published is an enormous gift to all of us.
      This book will be very useful for people traveling to Ukkusiksalik National Park (everyone planning a trip there should read it), as well as to students and teachers. It will also appeal to those who enjoy learning about the Arctic and its history.
  • 5
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    The Toronto Carrying Place Rediscovering Toronto's Most Ancient Trail Glenn Turner Canada
    9781459730465 Paperback HISTORY / Canada Publication Date: May 23, 2015 Print Run: 1500
    $30.00 CAD 8.5 x 8.5 x 0.32 in | 192 pages Carton Quantity: 44 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
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      Description
      2016 Heritage Toronto Book Award — Nominated

      Buried beneath Toronto’s streets is a centuries-old trail that was once the road to wealth, adventure, or violent death for thousands of travellers. Now its route lies hidden and forgotten under sidewalks and farmland, though its influence can still be seen.

      The Toronto Carrying Place brings Southern Ontario’s most important First Nations trail back to life. Retracing the ancient portage from Lake Ontario to Lake Simcoe, Glenn Turner reveals the dramatic events and extraordinary characters that marked Toronto’s earliest days, and shows how the path played a crucial role in the history of the Wendat (Huron), Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), and Mississauga First Nations. Toronto’s French and English heritage is also explored, and reminders of the Carrying Place are discovered in unlikely places along its forty-five-kilometre route. Many photographs, maps, and reproductions offer both hikers and armchair voyageurs a look at what remains today of this fascinating portage trail, and an insight into how it has affected the growth of the Greater Toronto Area.
      Bio
      Glenn Turner is a teacher-librarian with a career spanning three decades. His writing has appeared in numerous magazines including School Libraries in Canada and Preview. His interest in the Toronto Carrying Place trail stretches back to teenage summers on the banks of the Humber. He lives in Ottawa.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Heritage Toronto Book Award 2016, Short-listed
      Reviews
      The well-worn path no longer can be found and is under sidewalks, farm fields and buildings, but the author has turned back the pages of time and revealed details on the important trade route.
      …very informative and entertaining…the book contains a wealth of information about the trail and the history of people who used it over the centuries…
      What makes this book outstanding and unique is the author’s skillful blending of historical fact and research with a personal adventure…
      Turner is an engaging storyteller and this is an idiosyncratic, vivid, and generally informative introduction to the history of this famous trail.
  • 6
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    9781459729100 Paperback FICTION / Political Publication Date: April 25, 2015
    $17.99 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.59 in | 256 pages Carton Quantity: 52 Canadian Rights: Y A J. Patrick Boyer Book
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      Description
      Autumn, 1970: Hostage-taking separatists in Quebec abduct a foreign diplomat and a cabinet minister and threaten violence across the country. As fear sets in, the government turns to Luc Cadotte, a specialist on international terrorism and veteran of the clandestine struggles in Latin America.

      From the jungles of Colombia to Montreal under siege, former diplomat James Bartleman plots a turbulent thriller based on events he witnessed first-hand. Swerving between fanatical ideologues and crass careerists with bloody hands, Cadotte has to choose sides when they all seem dirty, and put everything on the line in a crisis that puts all that he stands for to the test.
      Bio
      James Bartleman is the former lieutenant governor of Ontario and the bestselling author of the novels As Long as the Rivers Flow and The Redemption of Oscar Wolf. A member of the Chippewas of Rama First Nation, he is also a retired ambassador and a member of the Order of Canada. He lives in Perth, Ontario.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Exceptional Circumstances is a thoughtful and modern presentation of the idea that political leaders can do illegal things based on necessity. It is a pernicious concept that Bartleman skillfully weaves through the politics of Colombia and Cuba and ends with its unvarnished and unnecessary use in Ottawa during the FLQ crisis in late 1970. Luc Cadotte, a young Metis from Georgian Bay, the main character, joins Foreign Affairs and is seduced into the shadowy world of global “exceptional circumstances” but a strong sense of home and family comes to the rescue. It is a must read for all who are disturbed by the willingness of democratically elected government to unfavorably alter the balance between the rulers and their citizens. More than two thumbs up. Gar Pardy, former Ambassador and Director General of Consular Affairs, Foreign Affairs Canada.
      Bartleman writes an excellent “spy novel” tempered in the realism of the time, situation, and politics. Class, minorities, justice, and cold war politics all shape this novel. There is not so much a battle between good and evil as it is a battle between varying shades of gray… An exciting action novel in places and a thought provoking novel throughout.
      James Bartleman has written a challenging novel of ideas. Set in the world of Canadian diplomacy in Latin America of the 60s and 70s, with a climax during the FLQ crisis, Exceptional Circumstances portrays moral issues and dilemmas that are directly relevant to the most current of events in Canada. Bartleman draws on his extensive background as a diplomat and intelligence community insider, as well as on the unique perspective offered by his aboriginal heritage, to shine a bright light on a question we can no longer ignore: can we protect our nation’s security without losing our soul?

      From the jungles of Colombia to Montreal under siege, former diplomat James Bartleman plots a turbulent thriller based on events witnessed firsthand.
  • 7
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    Series: Quest Biography
    Molly Brant Mohawk Loyalist and Diplomat Peggy Dymond Leavey Canada
    9781459728936 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date: April 25, 2015
    $22.99 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.54 in | 224 pages Carton Quantity: 60 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Molly Brant, a Mohawk girl born into poverty in 1736, became the consort of Sir William Johnson, one of the wealthiest white men in 18th-century America. Suspected of being a spy for the British during the American Revolution, Molly was forced to flee with her children or face imprisonment. Because of her ability to influence the Mohawks, her assistance was needed at Fort Niagara, and she found refuge there.

      A respected Mohawk matron, Molly became a vital link between her people and the Canadian Indian Department. Like her brother Joseph, she worked hard to keep five of the Six Nations on the side of the British throughout the war, believing the empty promises that all would be restored to them once the conflict ended. Although she was seen as fractious and demanding at times, her remarkable stamina and courage gained the respect of the highest levels of Canadian government.
      Bio
      Peggy Dymond Leavey's previous books for young people are Sky Lake Summer, The Deep End Gang, The Path Through the Trees, and Growing Up Ivy . Her other titles in the Quest Biography series include Mary Pickford and Laura Secord, a finalist for the Speaker’s Book Award in 2013. Peggy lives in Trenton, Ontario.
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      Awards
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      It’s a thorough and detailed work that expands our knowledge about Molly Brant and her early background.
  • 8
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    Paint Jennifer Dance Canada
    9781459728684 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Animals Age (years) from 9 - 12, Reading age from 9 - 12 Publication Date: January 24, 2015
    $12.99 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.65 in | 248 pages Carton Quantity: 48 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      CCBC's Best Books for Kids & Teens (Fall 2015) - Commended

      The life story of a painted mustang set against the backdrop of America’s Great Plains in the late 1800s.

      It’s the late 1800s. A Lakota boy finds an orphaned mustang foal and brings her back to his family’s camp, naming her Paint for her black-and-white markings. Boy and horse soon become inseparable. Together they learn to hunt buffalo, their fear of the massive beasts tempered by a growing trust in each other.

      When the U.S. Cavalry attacks the camp, the pair is forced onto separate paths. Paint’s fate becomes entwined with that of settlers, who bring irreversible change to the grassland, setting the stage for environmental disaster. Bought and sold several times, Paint finally finds a home with English pioneers on the Canadian Prairie.

      With a great dust storm looming on the horizon, man and horse will need to work together if they hope to survive.
      Bio
      Jennifer Dance was born in England and holds a B.Sc. in Agriculture and Animal Science from the University of the West Indies. She migrated to Canada in 1979. With family in the Native community, Jennifer has a passion for equality and justice for all people. Her first novel, Red Wolf, was endorsed by Giller Prize–winning author Joseph Boyden. An avid environmentalist, Jennifer lives on a small farm in Stouffville, Ontario.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      CCBC's Best Books for Kids & Teens (Fall 2015) 2015, Commended
      Reviews
      Paint is an excellent book for horse lovers, young girls, and has enough adventure to keep the interest of young boys.
      This book is well written [and] very entertaining.… The story is emotionally engaging as the reader comes to care about the horse Paint and her handlers.
      A painted mustang gives us a glimpse into how life used to be on the prairie...it's a great read.
      Dance’s voice, on behalf of the horse, is authentic…the reader becomes engaged and invested in the story and characters.
      Dance has found a way to tackle...complex topics, as well as provide a history lesson, that is not only understandable to children, but also interesting. What’s Dance’s secret? Animals.
      Jennifer Dance's Paint is a North American Black Beauty...Paint, the story of a mustang...has a social purpose, that of revealing the genocide and environmental destruction that occurred on the North American Great Plains in the late 19th century.
  • 9
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    Series: A Stonechild and Rouleau Mystery
    Butterfly Kills A Stonechild and Rouleau Mystery Brenda Chapman Canada
    9781459723146 Paperback FICTION / Mystery & Detective Publication Date: January 10, 2015
    $14.99 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.97 in | 376 pages Carton Quantity: 32 Canadian Rights: Y Dundurn
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Two separate crimes, two tragic outcomes.

      Jacques Rouleau has moved to Kingston to look after his father and take up the position of head of the town’s Criminal Investigations Division. One hot week in late September, university student Leah Sampson is murdered in her apartment. In another corner of the city, Della Munroe is raped by her husband. At first the crimes appear unrelated, but as Sergeant Rouleau and his new team of officers dig into the women’s pasts, they discover unsettling coincidences. When Kala Stonechild, one of Rouleau’s former officers from Ottawa, suddenly appears in Kingston, Rouleau enlists her to help.

      Stonechild isn’t sure if she wants to stay in Kingston, but agrees to help Rouleau in the short term. While she struggles with trying to decide if she can make a life in this new town, a ghost from her past starts to haunt her.

      As the detectives delve deeper into the cases, it seems more questions pop up than answers. Who murdered Leah Sampson? And why does Della Monroe’s name keep showing up in the murder investigation? Both women were hiding secrets that have unleashed a string of violence. Stonechild and Rouleau race to discover the truth before the violence rips more families apart.
      Bio
      Brenda Chapman began her writing career in children’s fiction. Her YA novel Hiding in Hawk’s Creek was short-listed for the CLA Book of the Year for Children. Her first adult mystery, In Winter's Grip, was published in 2010. She is the author of the Stonechild and Rouleau mystery series. She lives in Ottawa, Ontario.
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      Awards
      Reviews
      Altogether, Butterfly Kills is a very satisfying novel
      What makes this mystery most interesting are the tightly knit details. Chapman never tips her hand as she presents readers with a wide-open field of suspects. For the majority of the novel, the list of potential culprits is lengthy, and the author skillfully deploys twists and decoys to misdirect us, while also dropping tiny clues to help make the final reveal seem perfectly logical.
      This novel is well-paced and well-plotted…the book also smartly sets up some subplots that will no doubt carry the series forward.
      This novel is beautifully written, the plot is expertly crafted, and the characters are complex and well drawn.
      Butterfly Kills is another Stonechild and Rouleau mystery by Brenda Chapman whose impressive abilities in crafting memorable characters embedded in a complex mystery/suspense tale of unexpected twists and surprising turns results in a compellingly entertaining read from beginning to end.
      By the final chapter, Chapman has established the grounds for further entries in the series. Readers of crime fiction, especially Canadian ones who find local settings and concerns often hard to find in their favourite genre should be pleased to hear it.
      Chapman provides a fine balance between the minutiae of police work and the characters' complex personal lives. It's a story that is highly readable from beginning to end. I'm looking forward to Stonechild's next adventure.
      In Butterfly Kills, Brenda Chapman has written a gripping and disturbing sequel to Cold Mourning.
      A wonderfully knitted suspense filled with secrets, life, crime, and working hard to solve cases.
  • 10
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    Series: Point of View
    Time Bomb Canada and the First Nations Douglas L. Bland Canada, Bonnie Butlin Canada
    9781459727878 Paperback POLITICAL SCIENCE / Colonialism & Post-Colonialism Publication Date: November 29, 2014
    $19.99 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.56 in | 232 pages Carton Quantity: 56 Canadian Rights: Y A J. Patrick Boyer Book
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A look at how a major confrontation between Canada and the First Nations could erupt, and how it might be prevented.

      There are few greater tragedies than a war waged by a society against itself. As Time Bomb shows, a catastrophic confrontation between Canada’s so-called “settler” and First Nations communities is not only feasible, it is, in theory, inevitable. Grievances, prejudice, and other factors all combine to make the likelihood of a First Nations uprising very real.

      Time Bomb describes how a nationwide insurgency could unfold, how the "usual" police and military reactions to First Nations protests would only worsen such a situation, and how, on the other hand, innovative policies might defuse the smouldering time bomb in our midst.

      The question all Canadians and First Nations must answer is this: Must we all suffer the disaster of a great national insurgency or will we act together to extinguish the growing danger in our midst?

      Bio
      Douglas Bland served for thirty years as a senior officer in the Canadian Armed Forces, and later as Chair of Defence Studies at Queen's University. He is the author of the acclaimed novel Uprising and numerous books and essays on Canadian and international security affairs. He lives in Kingston, Ontario.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Bland’s examination of the problem, the players, the obstacles, and the stakes make Time Bomb an important read for all Canadians and also an educational read for others.

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