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Annick Press Fall 2017

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    #NotYourPrincess Voices of Native American Women Lisa Charleyboy Canada, Mary Beth Leatherdale Canada
    9781554519576 Paperback YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 14, Grade (CAN) from 9, Grade (US) from 9, Reading age from 14 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $14.95 CAD 8.5 x 10.9 x 0.4 in | 410 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Native Women demand to be heard in this stunning anthology.

      Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

      Bio

      Lisa Charleyboy (Tsilhqot'in) is Editor-In-Chief of Urban Native Magazine, which focuses on pop culture with an Indigenous twist. She is also the host of CBC Radio's New Fire. She lives in Vancouver.



      Mary Beth Leatherdale writes, edits and consults on books, magazines, and digital resources for children and youth.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Amelia Bloomer Project List, ALA 2017, Nominated
      American Indians in Children’s Literature Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Books of the Year, Quill & Quire 2017, Joint winner
      Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choices List 2018, Joint winner
      Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Award, YALSA 2017, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award 2018, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award, Bronze 2018, Joint winner
      Independent Publisher Book Award 2018, Joint winner
      Indigenous Literature Award, First Nation Communities READ 2018, Short-listed
      Kirkus Reviews Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Lincoln Award 2021, Nominated
      Nautilus Award, Silver 2018, Joint winner
      Next Generation Indie Book Award 2019, Short-listed
      Norma Fleck Award 2018, Nominated
      Notable Books for a Global Society 2018, Joint winner
      Read Indigenous List, Toronto Public Library 2018, Joint winner
      Red Maple Award 2018, Nominated
      School Library Journal Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Skipping Stones Honor Award 2018, Joint winner
      Texas TAYSHAS Reading List 2018, Joint winner
      Top Ten Best Bet, Ontario Library Association 2018, Joint winner
      Reviews

      “A stunning anthology of creative writing and art . . . All YA collections will want this.”


      “A moving and powerful collection that draws strength from the variety of voices and lived experiences it represents.”


      “Fills an under-represented niche.”


      “Both testament to the complexity of Indigenous women’s identities and ferocious statement that these women fully inhabit the modern world.”


      “Highly Recommended . . . What you see and read in this book will linger in your head and heart.”


      “One of the collection’s biggest strengths is the sheer range of work . . . Every turn of the page is exciting, which is exactly what you need in a book like this.”


      “Beautiful, angry and insistent, this collection of the voices of Native women belongs on the shelves of every library serving teens.”


      “Bursts with inspiration, beauty and self-awareness.”


      “So right for the times.”


      “This book truly has the potential to change minds . . . Do what you need to do to get this book and put it into the hands of teen (and adult) readers.”


      “Provocative, thoughtful and sometimes humorous, this book showcases tenacious and talented indigenous women ready to take on the world.”


      “Librarians, teachers, parents: please put this book into girls’ and teens’ hands.”


      “The design is dramatic, authentic, and full of observation and wisdom. It provokes thought and causes readers to reflect and consider alternate ways of looking at diversity, history and identity. You should read it, and then share it!”


      “Will educate teens and give them perspective on a subject that is often ignored.”


      “Often edgy, and always provocative.”


      “A touching collection.”


      “Visceral and eye-opening . . . [a] small but mighty read.”

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    #NotYourPrincess Voices of Native American Women Lisa Charleyboy Canada, Mary Beth Leatherdale Canada
    9781554519583 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 14, Grade (CAN) from 9, Grade (US) from 9, Reading age from 14 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $19.95 CAD 8.6 x 11.2 x 0.5 in | 580 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Native Women demand to be heard in this stunning anthology.

      Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

      Bio

      Lisa Charleyboy (Tsilhqot'in) is Editor-In-Chief of Urban Native Magazine, which focuses on pop culture with an Indigenous twist. She is also the host of CBC Radio's New Fire. She lives in Vancouver.



      Mary Beth Leatherdale writes, edits and consults on books, magazines, and digital resources for children and youth.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Amelia Bloomer Project List, ALA 2017, Nominated
      American Indians in Children’s Literature Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Books of the Year, Quill & Quire 2017, Joint winner
      Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choices List 2018, Joint winner
      Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Award, YALSA 2017, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award 2018, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award, Bronze 2018, Joint winner
      Independent Publisher Book Award 2018, Joint winner
      Indigenous Literature Award, First Nation Communities READ 2018, Short-listed
      Kirkus Reviews Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Lincoln Award 2021, Nominated
      Nautilus Award, Silver 2018, Joint winner
      Next Generation Indie Book Award 2019, Short-listed
      Norma Fleck Award 2018, Nominated
      Notable Books for a Global Society 2018, Joint winner
      Read Indigenous List, Toronto Public Library 2018, Joint winner
      Red Maple Award 2018, Nominated
      School Library Journal Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Skipping Stones Honor Award 2018, Joint winner
      Texas TAYSHAS Reading List 2018, Joint winner
      Top Ten Best Bet, Ontario Library Association 2018, Joint winner
      Reviews

      “A stunning anthology of creative writing and art . . . All YA collections will want this.”


      “A moving and powerful collection that draws strength from the variety of voices and lived experiences it represents.”


      “Fills an under-represented niche.”


      “Both testament to the complexity of Indigenous women’s identities and ferocious statement that these women fully inhabit the modern world.”


      “Highly Recommended . . . What you see and read in this book will linger in your head and heart.”


      “One of the collection’s biggest strengths is the sheer range of work . . . Every turn of the page is exciting, which is exactly what you need in a book like this.”


      “Beautiful, angry and insistent, this collection of the voices of Native women belongs on the shelves of every library serving teens.”


      “Bursts with inspiration, beauty and self-awareness.”


      “So right for the times.”


      “This book truly has the potential to change minds . . . Do what you need to do to get this book and put it into the hands of teen (and adult) readers.”


      “Provocative, thoughtful and sometimes humorous, this book showcases tenacious and talented indigenous women ready to take on the world.”


      “Librarians, teachers, parents: please put this book into girls’ and teens’ hands.”


      “The design is dramatic, authentic, and full of observation and wisdom. It provokes thought and causes readers to reflect and consider alternate ways of looking at diversity, history and identity. You should read it, and then share it!”


      “Will educate teens and give them perspective on a subject that is often ignored.”


      “Often edgy, and always provocative.”


      “A touching collection.”


      “Visceral and eye-opening . . . [a] small but mighty read.”

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    The Biker's Brother Peter Edwards Canada
    9781554519354 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Law & Crime Age (years) from 14, Grade (CAN) from 9, Grade (US) from 9, Reading age from 14 Publication Date:October 10, 2017
    $12.95 CAD 5.53 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 300 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Teenager Josh Williams has a lot on his plate: a football injury, a complicated relationship with his brother Jamie, who is a member of the Annihilators motorcycle gang, and a budding romance with Brenda. When a large urban motorcycle gang makes a move to take over the Annihilators, several conflicts between members erupt, resulting in the murder of Brenda’s brother. Jamie is arrested and it’s up to Josh to prove his brother’s innocence.

      Told through Josh’s point of view, the novel’s fast-paced dialogue and text messages reflect the contemporary world of today’s teen. Details of motorcycle gangs are revealed as Josh navigates his way between the world of a small town high school student and the inner workings of vicious biker gangs. Teen readers will be captivated by this suspense-filled murder mystery about Josh’s journey to find justice for his brother, peace in his family, and love for his girl.

      Bio

      Peter Edwards is the best-selling author of fifteen non-fiction titles and writes for The Toronto Star, specializing in organized crime and justice issues.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      “A good choice for reluctant male readers.” —VOYA, 10/17


      “Edwards crafts a clear mystery . . . a fresh setting and strong plot make this . . . a quick read.” —Booklist Online, 09/27/17

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    The Biker's Brother Peter Edwards Canada
    9781554519361 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Law & Crime Age (years) from 14, Grade (CAN) from 9, Grade (US) from 9, Reading age from 14 Publication Date:October 10, 2017
    $18.95 CAD 5.73 x 8.53 x 0.73 in | 410 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Teenager Josh Williams has a lot on his plate: a football injury, a complicated relationship with his brother Jamie, who is a member of the Annihilators motorcycle gang, and a budding romance with Brenda. When a large urban motorcycle gang makes a move to take over the Annihilators, several conflicts between members erupt, resulting in the murder of Brenda’s brother. Jamie is arrested and it’s up to Josh to prove his brother’s innocence.

      Told through Josh’s point of view, the novel’s fast-paced dialogue and text messages reflect the contemporary world of today’s teen. Details of motorcycle gangs are revealed as Josh navigates his way between the world of a small town high school student and the inner workings of vicious biker gangs. Teen readers will be captivated by this suspense-filled murder mystery about Josh’s journey to find justice for his brother, peace in his family, and love for his girl.

      Bio

      Peter Edwards is the best-selling author of fifteen non-fiction titles and writes for The Toronto Star, specializing in organized crime and justice issues.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      “A good choice for reluctant male readers.” —VOYA, 10/17


      “Edwards crafts a clear mystery . . . a fresh setting and strong plot make this . . . a quick read.” —Booklist Online, 09/27/17

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Turtle Island The Story of North America's First People Eldon Yellowhorn Canada, Kathy Lowinger Canada
    9781554519439 Paperback YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 11, Grade (CAN) from 6, Grade (US) from 6, Reading age from 11 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $16.95 CAD 7.5 x 9.3 x 0.2 in | 340 gr | 116 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Discover the amazing story of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas from the end of the Ice Age to the arrival of the Europeans.

      Unlike most books that chronicle the history of Native peoples beginning with the arrival of Europeans in 1492, this book goes back to the Ice Age to give young readers a glimpse of what life was like pre-contact. The title, Turtle Island, refers to a Native myth that explains how North and Central America were formed on the back of a turtle. Based on archeological finds and scientific research, we now have a clearer picture of how the Indigenous people lived. Using that knowledge, the authors take the reader back as far as 14,000 years ago to imagine moments in time. A wide variety of topics are featured, from the animals that came and disappeared over time, to what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to their surroundings. The importance of story-telling among the Native peoples is always present to shed light on how they explained their world. The end of the book takes us to modern times when the story of the Native peoples is both tragic and hopeful.

      Bio

      ELDON YELLOWHORN (Piikani Nation) is an archaeologist and professor of Indigenous Studies at Simon Fraser University. His research responds to the Calls to Action issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to search for children who died at residential schools. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.



      KATHY LOWINGER is an award-winning author whose books include Give Me Wings! How a Choir of Former Slaves Took on the World (2015), Turtle Island: The Story of North America’s First People (2017), and What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories of Rebellion and Renewal (2019). 

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Canadian Children’s Literature Roundtables Information Book Awards 2018, Short-listed
      EUREKA! Nonfiction Children’s Book Awards Honoree, California Reading Association 2018, Commended
      Nautilus Book Award, Gold 2019, Joint winner
      Red Maple Award 2018, Nominated
      Rocky Mountain Book Award 2018, Nominated
      Waterloo Red Maple Nonfiction Award 2019, Winner
      Reviews

      “Offers an appealing introduction to the diverse nations and remarkable resilience of the original inhabitants of this continent and is likely to inspire respect, pride, and a desire to learn more.”


      “Highly recommended for middle to high school collections for its innovative, nonstereotypical, and engaging approach to the history of Indigenous peoples in North America.”


      “A well researched book of high quality graphic design and literary style. The format and organization of material is well done within a uniquely imaginative approach to the topic . . . highly recommended for both public and school libraries . . . also would be a valuable resource for elementary school teachers.”


      “Fills a gap in history.”


      “An interesting read . . . a good addition to a school library.”


      “An excellent textbook to use in elementary or middle school to supplement conventional offerings.”

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Turtle Island The Story of North America's First People Eldon Yellowhorn Canada, Kathy Lowinger Canada
    9781554519446 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 11, Grade (CAN) from 6, Grade (US) from 6, Reading age from 11 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $24.95 CAD 8 x 9.5 x 0.3 in | 480 gr | 116 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Discover the amazing story of the Indigenous peoples of the Americas from the end of the Ice Age to the arrival of the Europeans.

      Unlike most books that chronicle the history of Native peoples beginning with the arrival of Europeans in 1492, this book goes back to the Ice Age to give young readers a glimpse of what life was like pre-contact. The title, Turtle Island, refers to a Native myth that explains how North and Central America were formed on the back of a turtle. Based on archeological finds and scientific research, we now have a clearer picture of how the Indigenous people lived. Using that knowledge, the authors take the reader back as far as 14,000 years ago to imagine moments in time. A wide variety of topics are featured, from the animals that came and disappeared over time, to what people ate, how they expressed themselves through art, and how they adapted to their surroundings. The importance of story-telling among the Native peoples is always present to shed light on how they explained their world. The end of the book takes us to modern times when the story of the Native peoples is both tragic and hopeful.

      Bio

      ELDON YELLOWHORN (Piikani Nation) is an archaeologist and professor of Indigenous Studies at Simon Fraser University. His research responds to the Calls to Action issued by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission to search for children who died at residential schools. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia.



      KATHY LOWINGER is an award-winning author whose books include Give Me Wings! How a Choir of Former Slaves Took on the World (2015), Turtle Island: The Story of North America’s First People (2017), and What the Eagle Sees: Indigenous Stories of Rebellion and Renewal (2019). 

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Canadian Children’s Literature Roundtables Information Book Awards 2018, Short-listed
      EUREKA! Nonfiction Children’s Book Awards Honoree, California Reading Association 2018, Commended
      Nautilus Book Award, Gold 2019, Joint winner
      Red Maple Award 2018, Nominated
      Rocky Mountain Book Award 2018, Nominated
      Waterloo Red Maple Nonfiction Award 2019, Winner
      Reviews

      “Offers an appealing introduction to the diverse nations and remarkable resilience of the original inhabitants of this continent and is likely to inspire respect, pride, and a desire to learn more.”


      “Highly recommended for middle to high school collections for its innovative, nonstereotypical, and engaging approach to the history of Indigenous peoples in North America.”


      “A well researched book of high quality graphic design and literary style. The format and organization of material is well done within a uniquely imaginative approach to the topic . . . highly recommended for both public and school libraries . . . also would be a valuable resource for elementary school teachers.”


      “Fills a gap in history.”


      “An interesting read . . . a good addition to a school library.”


      “An excellent textbook to use in elementary or middle school to supplement conventional offerings.”

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    The Disappearance Gillian Chan Canada
    9781554519828 Paperback YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Science Fiction Age (years) from 12, Grade (CAN) from 7, Grade (US) from 7 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $12.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.25 x 0.5 in | 240 gr | 208 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A fast-paced, gritty mystery with a supernatural twist.

      This novel centers on the unlikely friendship between two boys, Jacob Mueller and Mike McCallum. Jacob seems to be from a different world. After mystifying experts and doctors, who finally decide that he is an elective mute, Jacob ends up in a juvenile group home, isolated and withdrawn, the butt of teasing by the other kids. Mike exists in his own private hell. Scarred physically and emotionally after the murder of his younger brother, his one aim is to survive the system until he is legally old enough to get out. He uses his horrific appearance, imposing size, sharp intelligence, and a calculated brutality to keep everyone at bay—until he encounters Jacob. Almost despite himself, Mike is fascinated by Jacob, particularly the way in which he seems able to shut out the world around him. This fascination deepens and becomes tinged by a mixture of awe and horror when Jacob starts to talk, and appears to have knowledge of Mike’s past, and in particular of his dead brother. Mike takes it upon himself to solve the puzzle that is Jacob Mueller, and when he comes to what seems to him to be the impossible conclusion that Jacob is from another time, he makes it his mission to return him home. In order to do so, Mike has to make hard choices: choices which could offer the chance of redemption, but only at great cost.

      Bio

      Gillian Chan was born in England. The daughter of a serving RAF officer, she got used to moving every two years as her father was posted to new stations in England and Europe. This made for an interesting childhood, and led to her becoming a good observer, a useful characteristic for a writer. Gillian came to Canada in 1990 with her husband where she trained and worked as a high school teacher and librarian. Gillian loves traveling and researching the places she visits, and research often gives her ideas for stories.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Arthur Ellis Awards for Excellence in Canadian Crime Writing 2018, Short-listed
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Eric Hoffer Award 2018, Winner
      Hamilton Literary Award 2018, Nominated
      Reviews

      “A fast, compelling read.”


      “A solid genre-blurring addition that doesn’t shy away from realistic violence and language.”


      “A fast-paced, creepy mystery with a realistic setting . . . . Reluctant highly capable readers will be enticed, as will fans of R. L. Stine, Ripley’s Believe It or Not, and ghost stories.”


      “[An] extraordinary plot twist . . . [which] is unexpected and unique and wholly convincing.”


      “For readers looking for a twisted supernatural mystery with engaging characters, The Disappearance is an excellent choice.”


      “Will appeal to all middle-school-aged students.”


      “The characters are excellent and drafted carefully and fleshed out completely.”

  • 8
    catalogue cover
    The Disappearance Gillian Chan Canada
    9781554519835 Hardcover YOUNG ADULT FICTION / Science Fiction Age (years) from 12, Grade (CAN) from 7, Grade (US) from 7 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $18.95 CAD 6.75 x 8.5 x 0.65 in | 360 gr | 208 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A fast-paced, gritty mystery with a supernatural twist.

      This novel centers on the unlikely friendship between two boys, Jacob Mueller and Mike McCallum. Jacob seems to be from a different world. After mystifying experts and doctors, who finally decide that he is an elective mute, Jacob ends up in a juvenile group home, isolated and withdrawn, the butt of teasing by the other kids. Mike exists in his own private hell. Scarred physically and emotionally after the murder of his younger brother, his one aim is to survive the system until he is legally old enough to get out. He uses his horrific appearance, imposing size, sharp intelligence, and a calculated brutality to keep everyone at bay—until he encounters Jacob. Almost despite himself, Mike is fascinated by Jacob, particularly the way in which he seems able to shut out the world around him. This fascination deepens and becomes tinged by a mixture of awe and horror when Jacob starts to talk, and appears to have knowledge of Mike’s past, and in particular of his dead brother. Mike takes it upon himself to solve the puzzle that is Jacob Mueller, and when he comes to what seems to him to be the impossible conclusion that Jacob is from another time, he makes it his mission to return him home. In order to do so, Mike has to make hard choices: choices which could offer the chance of redemption, but only at great cost.

      Bio

      Gillian Chan was born in England. The daughter of a serving RAF officer, she got used to moving every two years as her father was posted to new stations in England and Europe. This made for an interesting childhood, and led to her becoming a good observer, a useful characteristic for a writer. Gillian came to Canada in 1990 with her husband where she trained and worked as a high school teacher and librarian. Gillian loves traveling and researching the places she visits, and research often gives her ideas for stories.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Arthur Ellis Awards for Excellence in Canadian Crime Writing 2018, Short-listed
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Eric Hoffer Award 2018, Winner
      Hamilton Literary Award 2018, Nominated
      Reviews

      “A fast, compelling read.”


      “A solid genre-blurring addition that doesn’t shy away from realistic violence and language.”


      “A fast-paced, creepy mystery with a realistic setting . . . . Reluctant highly capable readers will be enticed, as will fans of R. L. Stine, Ripley’s Believe It or Not, and ghost stories.”


      “[An] extraordinary plot twist . . . [which] is unexpected and unique and wholly convincing.”


      “For readers looking for a twisted supernatural mystery with engaging characters, The Disappearance is an excellent choice.”


      “Will appeal to all middle-school-aged students.”


      “The characters are excellent and drafted carefully and fleshed out completely.”

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    The Man Who Knew Everything The Strange Life of Athanasius Kircher Marilee Peters Canada, Roxanna Bikadoroff Canada
    9781554519736 Paperback JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography Age (years) from 9 - 12, Grade (CAN) from 5 - 8, Grade (US) from 5 - 8, Reading age from 9 - 12 Publication Date:October 10, 2017
    $14.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.1 in | 220 gr | 60 pages Carton Quantity:70 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Even the man who knew everything was wrong some of the time.

      The Man Who Knew Everything is a biography of Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century German Jesuit and scientist. He was one of the modern world’s first scientific celebrities—the Einstein or Stephen Hawking of his time. In 1638, Kircher was lowered into the smoking crater of Mt. Vesuvius to observe how volcanoes work. After thirty years, he published an 800-page volume of his findings—along with theories about fossils, geography, the Earth’s core, dragons, the location of the lost city of Atlantis, and more.

      Kircher has been described as the last Renaissance man, the first postmodernist, and “the man who knew everything.” The Man Who Knew Everything celebrates Kircher’s insatiable curiosity, his willingness to ask questions and to suggest answers, even when he sometimes got it wrong.

      Peters’ dramatic re-telling of Kircher’s life is complemented by colorized versions of his etchings, and lively illustrations by the award-winning artist, Roxanna Bikadoroff.

      Bio

      Marilee Peters is a former librarian who over the years has written about politics, theater, the environment, parenting, farming, and health, among other topics. She is the author of Patient Zero, 10 Rivers that Shaped the World, and Making It Right. She lives with her family in Vancouver, BC.



      Roxanna Bikadoroff is an award-winning artist whose illustrations have been published internationally for more than twenty-five years. Her work has been shown around the world, and has appeared in the New Yorker, The Walrus, and on the covers of books by the likes of Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, Bill Richardson, and Roald Dahl.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Green Book Festival Award 2018, Joint winner
      The Year’s Best List, Resource Links 2017, Joint winner
      Reviews

      “Engaging and funny, this biography uses history to think critically about how knowledge is found. A winning addition to nonfiction collections.”


      “A colorful figure in the history of science whose ‘misses’ are as entertaining and instructive as his ‘hits.’”


      “Peters does an excellent job of calling attention to the changing face of science over history.”


      “A really fun read, and I loved the illustrations by Roxanna Bikadoroff.”


      “A little irreverent, a lot of details and a general impression of something innovative.”


      “An ideal book for a wide range of readers.”


      “Peters clearly has enormous enthusiasm for Kircher . . . [and] Bikadoroff brings a fitting visual approach to such an eccentric subject.”


      “This biography celebrates Kircher’s insatiable curiosity.”

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    The Man Who Knew Everything The Strange Life of Athanasius Kircher Marilee Peters Canada, Roxanna Bikadoroff Canada
    9781554519743 Hardcover JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography Age (years) from 9 - 12, Grade (CAN) from 5 - 8, Grade (US) from 5 - 8, Reading age from 9 - 12 Publication Date:October 10, 2017
    $19.95 CAD 8.05 x 10 x 0.1 in | 360 gr | 60 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Even the man who knew everything was wrong some of the time.

      The Man Who Knew Everything is a biography of Athanasius Kircher, a 17th-century German Jesuit and scientist. He was one of the modern world’s first scientific celebrities—the Einstein or Stephen Hawking of his time. In 1638, Kircher was lowered into the smoking crater of Mt. Vesuvius to observe how volcanoes work. After thirty years, he published an 800-page volume of his findings—along with theories about fossils, geography, the Earth’s core, dragons, the location of the lost city of Atlantis, and more.

      Kircher has been described as the last Renaissance man, the first postmodernist, and “the man who knew everything.” The Man Who Knew Everything celebrates Kircher’s insatiable curiosity, his willingness to ask questions and to suggest answers, even when he sometimes got it wrong.

      Peters’ dramatic re-telling of Kircher’s life is complemented by colorized versions of his etchings, and lively illustrations by the award-winning artist, Roxanna Bikadoroff.

      Bio

      Marilee Peters is a former librarian who over the years has written about politics, theater, the environment, parenting, farming, and health, among other topics. She is the author of Patient Zero, 10 Rivers that Shaped the World, and Making It Right. She lives with her family in Vancouver, BC.



      Roxanna Bikadoroff is an award-winning artist whose illustrations have been published internationally for more than twenty-five years. Her work has been shown around the world, and has appeared in the New Yorker, The Walrus, and on the covers of books by the likes of Angela Carter, Flannery O’Connor, Bill Richardson, and Roald Dahl.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Green Book Festival Award 2018, Joint winner
      The Year’s Best List, Resource Links 2017, Joint winner
      Reviews

      “Engaging and funny, this biography uses history to think critically about how knowledge is found. A winning addition to nonfiction collections.”


      “A colorful figure in the history of science whose ‘misses’ are as entertaining and instructive as his ‘hits.’”


      “Peters does an excellent job of calling attention to the changing face of science over history.”


      “A really fun read, and I loved the illustrations by Roxanna Bikadoroff.”


      “A little irreverent, a lot of details and a general impression of something innovative.”


      “An ideal book for a wide range of readers.”


      “Peters clearly has enormous enthusiasm for Kircher . . . [and] Bikadoroff brings a fitting visual approach to such an eccentric subject.”


      “This biography celebrates Kircher’s insatiable curiosity.”

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