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Biblioasis Winter 2018

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  • 1
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    1979 Ray Robertson Canada
    9781771960960 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:March 06, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.8 in | 0.84 lb | 250 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      It’s 1979 and Tom Buzby is thirteen years old and living in the small working- class city of Chatham, Ontario. So far, so normal. Except that Tom’s dad is the local tattoo artist, his mother is a born-again former stripper who’s run off with the minister from the church where the pet store used to be, and his sister can’t wait to leave town for good. And everyone along his daily newspaper route looks at him a little differently, this boy who’s come back from the dead, who just might be the only one who understands the miraculous, heart-breaking mystery that is their lives.

      Set in the year that real newspaper headlines told of North America’s hard turn to the right, 1979 offers a smalltown take on the buried lives of those who almost never make the news, and one boy’s attempt to make sense of it all.

      Bio
      Ray Robertson is the author of eight novels and three works of non-fiction. His work has been translated into several languages. Born and raised in Chatham, Ontario, he lives in Toronto.
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      Praise for 1979

      "[An] entertaining new novel." —Metro Toronto

      "As Robertson traces Tom’s coming of age, he explores themes of innocence lost, wisdom gained and learning to forgive ... [Robertson's] talent as a writer shows in his clear prose and ability to create unique and believable characters." —Winnipeg Free Press

      "Richly and sympathetically imagined...beautifully crafted, a rich and textured perspective of small town life, a nostalgic journey that resonates with the world of today." —Kerry Clare, Pickle Me This

      "Brilliant...what [1979] does most brilliantly is show us how we’re conditioned (in literature and in life) to notice only the shiny objects, the noise, to watch the magician’s hand, even though we know full well that’s not where the magic is." —Matilda Magtree

      "I'm always on board for a new Ray Robertson novel, and one wonders what will have to happen for him to get to the front rank of Canadian writing, as he so richly deserves…Ray has a light touch; writes clean, punchy sentences; and has a musicality and movement in his prose that is a singular gift. I'll drop pretty much anything to read whatever he writes." 49th Shelf

      "Robertson has a knack for capturing the texture of adolescent life, and his version of small-town Ontario is vividly rendered."Quill & Quire

      "One to watch for, if you enjoy small-town Canadian stories, is 1979 by Ray Robertson. Tom Buzby, a thirteen year-old living in Chatham, Ontario, narrates this sweetly nostalgic coming-of-age story about Tom's developing interest in girls, his understanding of his parent's divorce, and his discovery of various rock bands (you could make an amazing playlist from records mentioned in this novel). I also loved reading about the dynamic between Tom and his sister, Julie. What makes this story a true gem however, is how Tom’s narrative is interspersed with a glimpse into the very private lives of his neighbours, including the people whose papers he delivers, and those whose paths cross his for other reasons." Ottawa Public Library

      "Robertson does an impeccable job."—Full Disclosure Praise for Ray Robertson

      "Sharp-tongued … as Robertson ponders family and home as well as ‘what it means to love someone and to lose someone and to have to go on living anyway,’ he presents an intriguing character whose very real troubles are offset by bright flashes of hope."—Publishers Weekly

      "… filled with sly wit and keen observation … an exceptional novel by one of the country’s finest literary voices."—The National Post

  • 2
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    Where's Bob? Ann Ireland Canada
    9781771962278 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:May 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.53 in | 320 gr | 296 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Newly divorced, Lydia’s life is in a downward spiral. Looking for respite, she takes off on a vacation to Mexico with her formerly estranged mother. But instead of sun and sand, what she finds beyond the hotel’s miniature jungles and Mayan statuary and folk dancing is a country where the people, many of whom serve her and her mother at the resort, live in fear, their lives dominated by cartels and corruption, and where journalists and politicians are made to disappear for even poking around the truth. But it’s also where she finds Bob, a mysterious man from Detroit who works all the angles.

      Peeling away the fantasy veneer of the tourists’ Mexico to reveal a real life underworld of money laundering, political intimidation, and murder, Where’s Bob? offers up a fast-paced tragicomic page-turner about mothers and daughters and the callous blindness of tourists, and how easy it is to slip from one world into the other.

      Bio

      Ann Ireland is a prize-winning author of five novels. She teaches creative writing at Ryerson University in Toronto, writes feature articles about visual artists, and is a contributing editor for Numero Cinq online magazine. Her first novel was made into a feature film, The Pianist, directed by Claude Gagnon. She is a past president of PEN Canada.

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      Awards
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      Praise for Where's Bob?

      "An expert of her craft, Ireland doesn’t just portray this theme from the perspective of the one left behind, but also explores the impulse that causes people to leave others behind...Where’s Bob? is a novel full of contrasting characters who show us the depth of the book’s central issues, written by a woman who grasped the Canadian experience in a global context. Ireland has captured what it means to overcome the past and become the one who leaves." —Prairie Fire

      Praise for Ann Ireland

      "Scrupulous, vivid detailing of emotion, compulsion, struggle—bloody awful old love…It’s chilling, the way you feel the artist in her, not just the women, going under. The huge disparity between what one lover is ready to give and the other is able to take—when you realize what her role in his life is and his in hers—that’s to me the real discovery. And that’s when the story transcends this story, these particular people. It doesn’t say, 'Good thing she got away from that asshole, about time she figured him out' in the standard, boring feminist style. It says something like, 'Look—this is how we are, this is how we live.'"Alice Munro

      “Ireland’s writing has remarkable humour, and gentle but unshying insight into character. As a past president of PEN, no doubt she’s heard tales to make one shudder.” —The Globe and Mail “[Ireland] is unquestionably an engrossing read.” —The Toronto Star

      “[Ireland] has a gift for alternating dialogue with long paragraphs describing complex emotional shifts. These nuanced interior musings mirror the unstated counterpoint to conversations between two people who have an involved history, who know one another’s thresholds – emotionally, intellectually physically. Ireland has created a physical look on the page for this state.... she is a strong graphic writer.” —Ottawa Citizen

  • 3
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    Zolitude Paige Cooper Canada
    9781771962179 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:March 01, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.53 in | 240 gr | 248 pages Carton Quantity:56 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      WINNER OF THE 2018 QUEBEC WRITERS' FEDERATION CONCORDIA UNIVERSITY FIRST BOOK PRIZE

      LONGLISTED FOR THE 2018 SCOTIABANK GILLER PRIZE

      FINALIST FOR THE 2018 DANUTA GLEED LITERARY AWARD

      FINALIST FOR THE 2018 GOVERNOR GENERAL'S LITERARY AWARD FOR FICTION

      A GLOBE AND MAIL BEST BOOK OF 2018

      A QUILL & QUIRE BOOK OF THE YEAR

      Fantastical, magnetic, and harsh—these are the women in Paige Cooper’s debut short story collection Zolitude. They are women who built time machines when they were nine, who buy plane tickets for lovers who won’t arrive. They are sisters writhing with dreams, blasé about sex but beggared by love—while the police horses have talons and vengeance is wrought by eagles the size of airplanes. Broken-down motorbikes and housebroken tyrannosaurs, cheap cigarettes and mail bombs—Cooper finds the beautiful and the disturbing in both the surreal and the everyday. Troubling, carnal, and haunting, these stories are otherworldly travelogues through banal, eco-fabulist dystopias. Zolitude is a gorgeous, sad, and sexy work of slipstream and an atlas of fantastic isolation. The monstrous is human here, and tender.

      Bio

      Paige Cooper’s stories have appeared in The Fiddlehead, Gulf Coast, Michigan Quarterly Review, Carousel, and Canadian Notes & Queries, among others, and have been anthologized in The Journey Prize Stories, and Best Canadian Stories. She works for a record label in Montreal. Zolitude is her first book.

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      Awards
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      PRAISE FOR ZOLITUDE

      "The consensus newcomer of the year." —Montreal Gazette

      "[A] spikily surreal debut collection...vivid, complex...brilliant." —Library Journal (starred review)

      "[A]cross fourteen stories Cooper builds strange, genre-defying, sci-fi- and fantasy-infused realities that are distinctly her own. Truly, they’re like nothing else you’ve read lately." —Toronto Star

      "A timely exploration of love and humanity...urgent and energetic." —Winnipeg Free Press

      "One of this year's most adventurous and technically accomplished debuts ... Cooper appears almost frighteningly assured in her approach and execution. The author wields language like a finely tuned instrument." —Quill & Quire Book of the Year citation

      "...Raw talent and breathtaking writing. Zolitude is a book of short stories that demand to be read slowly like poetry, each image being at once perplexing and containing prisms of meaning. Cooper’s portraits of young women and the way their bodies merge their identities with one another and are at once invisible and present in every object they touch are so wonderful. Cooper’s descriptions of lost girls in foreign lands are reminiscent of the melancholy meanderings of Jean Rhys, but are wholly new." —Jury Citation for the 2018 Danuta Gleed Literary Award

      "Cooper has a keen eye for the quirks of human behavior." —Publishers Weekly

      "Each of Zolitude's fourteen stories explores intimacy as a basic need and the ways love can be articulated, perceived, and frustrated. The result is a collection that is often astonishing and occasionally crests the extraordinary." —The Walrus

      "Rarely have love stories seemed less cliché and predictable...tenderness and violence and doom are so densely layered as to deliver the affective impact of a novel...these stories are so well made, so viscerally moving, I often found the need to take a break between them to recover. "—Quill & Quire (starred review)

      "Cooper proves that she can do just about anything. She's as comfortable telling a story from the perspective of a hip young record-label employee... whose hand is blown off by a mail bomb (‘Ryan & Irene, Irene & Ryan’) as she is telling the story of a mounted police officer who lives on the edge of loss and violence (‘The Emperor’) ... Readers willing to give themselves over to some mystery will be rewarded." —Kirkus

      "Zolitude is Cooper’s first short story collection, but it reads like the work of a far more seasoned writer. Her stories are painful and wise, ugly and moving, and at their best, reveal uncomfortable truths about human connection and its limits ... With each opening paragraph, she pitches us into a new atmosphere, full of gorgeous detail and emotional rawness, a world that feels too real to be a fantasy, or perhaps just fantastic enough to be real." —Montreal Review of Books

      "When I read a Cooper story, “Vazova on Love” for example, I feel I have been transported into a strange country, a puzzling one, sensuous and potentially hostile, and I know she will reveal something to me if I stay very focused." —André Forget

      "Exhilarating." —Calgary Herald

      "Daring, endlessly inventive, cryptic, sometimes eerie...By eluding our grasp time and time again, Cooper’s stories challenge us to put aside our misgivings, to follow their lead, to forget how we think fiction should behave and give ourselves over to something unapologetically strange and disquieting...Weird, unsettling fiction may be nothing new, but rarely do we encounter a writer who renders their peculiar creative universe with such clarity and confidence." —The Antigonish Review

      "Paige Cooper’s finely-crafted debut collection...crackles and spits with intelligence. Cooper has honed a style that lends itself to unusual, crystalline landscapes.... Even worlds that are familiar are made strange in [her] lucid imagination." —The Arkansas International

      "As strange and wonderful as the characters in these pages are, they are grounded in real emotion and experience, longing and loneliness." —Open Book

      "Paige Cooper's stories screw down into the earth, holding fire in their gaps. Her characters turn zero sum games into bloodsport. Zolitude will not leave you alone." —Sasha Frere-Jones

      "Zolitude is the literary equivalent of a non-stop action film. These stories are tough and visceral and fraught. Cooper’s characters – sometimes reckless, sometimes tender, always fierce – are breathtakingly fresh and wonderfully complicated. When you finish this book – about how the world marks us and how we mark ourselves – the word ‘culpability' will have new meanings. These are worlds that are keenly observed and then forged into the kind of wild and uncompromising stories the times demand." —Aislinn Hunter, author of Stay and The World Before Us

      "Cooper's stories feature far-flung worlds, magnified consciousness. This is mesmerizing work.—Tamara Faith Berger, author of Maidenhead

  • 4
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    Series: reSet Series
    Light Shining Out of Darkness And Other Stories Hugh Hood, John Metcalf Canada
    9781771961882 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:August 28, 2018
    $24.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 580 gr | 250 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      Like the paintings of Jan Vermeer and Edward Hopper, Hugh Hood’s short fiction looks hard at what some might call the surface of things. Like the finely wrought realism of those canvases, Hood’s super-realist style doesn’t just see—it sees into. While his early publications prompted his reputation as an originator of Canadian modernism, Hood’s work taken as a whole reveals a philosophy far older: that of the allegorist. Like Dante’s pilgrim, Hood’s narrator finds spiritual truths in recognizable forms, affirming again and again the imagination’s capacity for penetrating insight and the transcendental potential of art. As he wrote in 1971, “I have at all times endeavoured to look steadily at my subjects. I hope my gaze has helped to light them up.”

      With a foreword by John Metcalf, Light Shining Out of Darkness collects twenty-five of the best stories by this modern master of the form, whose sensibility set him apart from the writers of his generation and continues to distinguish his oeuvre as among the 20th century’s most enduring. Best understood as a suite of modern meditations, seemingly quotidian explorations of salvation, temptation, and damnation in an irreligious world, Hood balances insight into human failing with compassion for our shared condition.

      Bio

      Hugh Hood (1928–2000) was a Canadian novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and university professor. Hood wrote 32 books: 17 novels, including the 12-volume New Age novel sequence (influenced by Marcel Proust and Anthony Powell), several volumes of short fiction, and 5 of nonfiction. He taught English literature at the Université de Montréal. In the early 1970s he and fellow authors Clark Blaise, Raymond Fraser, John Metcalf, and Ray Smith formed the well-known Montreal Story Tellers Fiction Performance Group, which popularized the public reading of fiction in Canada. In 1988, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

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  • 5
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    9781771961431 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:May 15, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 400 gr | 328 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      NOMINATED FOR THE 2019 BEST TRANSLATED BOOK AWARD

      A VANITY FAIR HOT TYPE BOOK FOR APRIL 2018

      A VULTURE MUST-READ TRANSLATED BOOK FROM THE PAST 5 YEARS

      A GLOBE AND MAIL BEST BOOK OF 2018

      A LIT HUB FAVOURITE BOOK OF THE YEAR

      A WORLD LITERATURE TODAY NOTABLE TRANSLATION OF 2018

      In a crumbling apartment block in the Angolan city of Luanda, families work, laugh, scheme, and get by. In the middle of it all is the melancholic Odonato, nostalgic for the country of his youth and searching for his lost son. As his hope drains away and as the city outside his doors changes beyond all recognition, Odonato’s flesh becomes transparent and his body increasingly weightless. A captivating blend of magical realism, scathing political satire, tender comedy, and literary experimentation, Transparent City offers a gripping and joyful portrait of urban Africa quite unlike any before yet published in English, and places Ondjaki, indisputably, among the continent’s most accomplished writers.

      Bio

      Ondjaki was born in Luanda, Angola in 1977. He is the author of five novels, four short-story collections, and numerous books of poems and stories for children. He has also made a documentary film, May Cherries Grow, about his native city. His books have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

      In 2008 Ondjaki was awarded the Grinzane for Africa Prize in the category of Best Young Writer. In 2012 The Guardian named him one of its “Top Five African Writers.” Transpar-ent City won the 2013 José Saramago Prize in Portugal, and, in France, the 2015 Prix Trans-fuge for Best African Novel and a 2016 Prix Littérature-Monde from the St. Malo World Literature Festival.

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      Awards
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      Praise for Transparent City

      "Vibrant...Ondjaki is experimentally bold, and his prose shifts through a kaledioscope of registers, from the poetic to the political, the erotic to the absurd...Stephen Henighan's thoughtful translation has an energetic lyricism and is alive to the echoes and vestiges of the African languages that imbue Ondjaki's text...The novel begins and ends with a raging inferno, and yet it is as full of hope, appetite and libidinal energy as it is of grief and mourning." —Times Literary Supplement

      "darkly pretty...peppered with poetry...These disparate stories are woven into a beautiful narrative that touches on government corruption, the privatization of water, the dangers of extracting oil for wealth, and the bastardization of religion for profit.. The novel reads like a love song to a tortured, desperately messed-up city that is undergoing remarkable transformations."—Publishers Weekly

      "A poetic, chaotic web of a book, hilarious and touching, written in a compelling run-on narrative, flowing and sensory. It has a wide scope and won’t be for the faint of heart, but those willing to take the leap will happily swim through the rushing current of this strange, dark comedy, with its tender characters and bizarre tales."—Book Riot

      "It’s been a long time since I read a novel like Ondjaki’s Transparent City...It’s a hugely risk-taking book, in the way that it’s structured above all else, but also in its blend of stylized surrealism and harrowing realism. As it tells the story of a man whose body is gradually losing its presence, amidst chaos in the city around him, Transparent City achieves a tremendous sense of clarity. And its blend of the familiar and the uncanny seems decidedly suited to the experience of living through 2018." —LitHub

      "In telling the story of a man named Odonato, who is slowly fading out of existence, and the chaotic city around him, Ondjaki takes risks that actually smooth the flow. In other words, he’s experimental without being off-putting; it helps that his tale is both ecstatic and bittersweet. The language immerses the reader in the novel’s milieu, but also charts out unexpected dimensions." —Vulture

      "Ondjaki’s prose pulses with life...shine[s] with an unexpected clarity." —World Literature Today

      "A richly imagined, tender and also critical portrait of the city in apocalyptic times." —CBC's Writers & Company

      "A lively and invigorating novel...With Transparent City, Ondjaki takes his place among the great fabulists of the past century...so rich in heart, and so startlingly fresh in structure and delivery, [he] has gifted us with a contemporary masterpiece." —Toronto Star

      "The prose in which Ondjaki tells this story is deftly stylized, suggesting the hazy interconnections between the cast of this sprawling, stunning work. Over time, the plot threads begin to converge, and both the miraculous and the absurdist aspects take on tragic qualities as the novel reaches its stunning conclusion." —Words Without Borders

      Praise for Ondjaki

      “Ondjaki delivers playful magical realism with delightful defiance.” The Barnes & Noble Review

      “As with Ondjaki’s other novels—including Bom dis camaradas (2001; Good Morning Comrades) and Os Transparentes (2012)—this is a strangely deceptive read. Although the narrative often feels rather whimsical, Angola’s long history of colonialism and conflict, its various foreign allies and enemies, and the extraordinary suffering of its population, are menacingly present . . . a brave and highly political work.” Times Literary Supplement

  • 6
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    The Running-Shaped Hole Robert Earl Stewart Canada
    9781771962230 Paperback SPORTS & RECREATION / Running & Jogging Publication Date:October 23, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 1 gr | 304 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      In November of 2012, Robert Earl Stewart left a cardiologist’s office terrified of dying. He was 38 years old and weighed 368 pounds. Not so much an instructional manual on how to run, but a humorous meditation on what not to do, The Running-Shaped Hole examines how running affected Stewart as a husband, father, recovered alcoholic, journalist, bookseller, and writer, following him through various adventures, injuries, and spiritual epiphanies had while running.

      Bio

      Robert Earl Stewart is the author of two poetry collections, Something Burned Along the Southern Border and Campfire Radio Rhapsody. He has worked as a newspaper reporter, editor, photographer, and bookseller. He lives in Windsor, Ontario, with his wife and three children

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  • 7
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    The Year of No Summer Rachel Lebowitz Canada
    9781771962193 Paperback NATURE / Essays Publication Date:March 27, 2018
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 200 gr | 160 pages Carton Quantity:64 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      On April 10th, 1815, Indonesia’s Mount Tambora erupted. Th e resulting build-up of ash in the stratosphere altered weather pat-terns and led, in 1816, to a year without summer. Instead, there were June snowstorms, food shortages, epidemics, inventions, and the proliferation of new cults and religious revivals.

      Hauntingly meaningful in today’s climate crisis, Lebowitz’s lyric essay charts the events and eff ects of that apocalyptic year. Weaving together history, mythology, and memoir, The Year of No Summer ruminates on weather, war, and our search for God and meaning in times of disaster.

      Bio

      Rachel Lebowitz, the author of Hannus (Pedlar Press, 2006), was shortlisted for the 2007 Roderick Haig-Brown Regional Prize (BC Book Prize) and the Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction. She is also the author of Cottonopolis (Pedlar Press, 2013) and the co-author, with Zachariah Wells, of the children’s picture book Anything But Hank! (Biblioasis, 2008, illustrated by Eric Orchard). She lives in Halifax, where she coordinates adult tutoring programs at her neighbourhood library.

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      Awards
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      Praise for The Year of No Summer

      “Disparate musings cohere into a lyrical meditation on violence, disaster, and humanity’s yearning for solace.” —Kirkus

      “Follows in the footsteps of Claudia Rankine, Maggie Nelson, Daphne Marlatt, and Anne Carson...these essays cling to you long after you’ve read them, like lingering grains of wet, black sand.” —Literary Review of Canada

      “Lebowitz has found in this event a rich vein to mine in her impressionistic lyric essay, combining history, poetry, memoir, fable and storytelling to bring to the page her take on that apocalyptic time.” —Toronto Star

      “Darkly fascinating...Lebowitz highlights the parables, fables and myths we humans created in order to weave meaning into our lives and to which we return for comfort.” —Atlantic Books Today

      “Sobering.” —Geist

      “An inherently fascinating and informative read from first page to last...as thoughtful and thought-provoking as it is historically accurate and contemporarily relevant. Exceptionally well written, organized and presented.” —Midwest Book Review

      "In these surprising, melancholic, and perceptive essays, Lebowitz finds a new form to witness, if not explain, the “still body—the still-fierce beating heart” of life on earth." —Canadian Literature

      Praise for Rachel Lebowitz

      “Lebowitz succeeds in extracting gems from the ambitious sweep of time and geography that the narrative embraces, and her presentation of her subject matter welcomes us into a strange and brutal world.”—ARC Poetry

      “Rachel Lebowitz is quickly becoming one of the best collagist poets in Canada today…What unfolds is a breathtaking, eerie and oddly beautiful look at the vicious underbelly of capitalism…”—Fiddlehead

  • 8
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    Dark Woods Richard Sanger Canada
    9781771962322 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:April 03, 2018
    $18.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.53 in | 100 gr | 80 pages Carton Quantity:100 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      A NEW YORK TIMES BEST POETRY BOOK OF 2018

      Snow, canoes, frozen ponds, lonely conifers . . . Dark Woods takes the motifs and landscape of a Canadian childhood and examines their place in a world of smartphones and overflowing inboxes. The result, Sanger’s first book in 16 years, is a striking new collection full of mysteries and reassessments, wordplay, slang, and sonnets, meditations on parenthood and the “cracks in the granite”: those urges that won’t go away, and the people who have.

      Bio

      Richard Sanger’s previous collections are Shadow Cabinet and Calling Home; his poems have appeared in many publications in Canada, the US and Britain, including the London Review of Books and Poetry Review. His plays include Not Spain, Two Words for Snow, Hannah’s Turn and Dive as well as translations of Calderon, Lope de Vega and Lorca. He has also published essays, reviews and journalism. He lives in Toronto.

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      Awards
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      Praise for Dark Woods

      “The rueful, lucid, deliberately casual poems in “Dark Woods” can surprise you with their tenderness, but also with their prickly intelligence.” —The New York Times

      “In the poems' accentual, lightly metered stanzas we are made conscious of time passing, the body aging, and those quiet moments outside time...understated and moving.” —The Malahat Review

      "[Sanger's] poems are tender and often funny. Sometimes arch, sometimes bemused, he is a humane observer of daily life....Throughout Dark Woods, his cleverness and verbal mischief enliven traditional forms." —Canadian Literature

      Praise for Richard Sanger

      “Splendidly-shaped and imagistically adroit. These are outstanding poems.”—The Globe and Mail

      “[Sanger] naturalizes the traditional influences in his poems so thoroughly they are almost covert. This gives his poems an inner voice running under the colloquial surface and suggests an attitude toward consciousness in a lyric poem as interesting as the dislocated subject…” —Books-in-Canada

      “Spectacular… Sophisticated metrical sense, teasing wit and limitless linguistic resources… The real thing: an original poet of rare talent.” —The Montreal Gazette

      “Very accomplished… [Sanger] writes in a voice that is all his own, and its groundtone is a cleverly, progressively sophisticated one which is never merely adroit.” —Journal of Canadian Poetry

  • 9
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    9781771962353 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:April 10, 2018
    $18.95 CAD 5 x 7 x 0.38 in | 80 gr | 72 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      A NEW YORK TIMES BEST POETRY BOOK OF 2018

      A transfiguration of Mennonite hymns into heartbreaking lyric poems, Years, Months, and Days is a moving “meditation on the possibility of translation.” Bridging secular spirituality and holy reverence with the commonalities of life, death, love, and hope, Jernigan explores the connection between hymn and poem, recalling the spare beauty of Marilynne Robinson’s novels or the poems of Jan Zwicky and Robert Bringhurst. The sparse and tender phrasing of Years, Months, and Days is “an offering of words to music,” made in the spirit of a shared love—for life, for a particular landscape and its rhythms—that animates poem and prayer alike.

      Bio
      Amanda Jernigan is the author of two previous collections of poems, Groundwork and All the Daylight Hours, and of the chapbook The Temple, published by Baseline Press in 2018. Her poems have appeared in Poetry, Parnassus, PN Review, The Dark Horse, Atlanta Review, and The Nation, as well as in numerous Canadian literaries, and have been set to music, most recently by Zachary Wadsworth and Colin Labadie. She is an essayist and editor as well as a poet, and has written for the stage.
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      Awards
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      Praise for Years, Months, and Days

      "[Years, Months, and Days] is carried by Jernigan’s obvious respect for her sponsoring material and by her superb ear." —The New York Times

      "Exquisite . . . deeply resonant . . . There’s often a metaphysical cast to her forthright observations, which makes them both evocative and poignant." —Toronto Star

      "Amanda Jernigan’s small and beautiful book should be on your bedside table even if it is as heaped as mine. Just 4” by 5” and fewer than 70 pages, the book consists of untitled, spare, and simply-worded poems which evoke the cycles of life, the seasons, and human longing for meaning and connection. The poems expand in your head, opening your mind to matters beyond the day-to-day."—Arc Poetry Magazine

      "The poems are tiny, seeds only, bare of flourish, each containing the germ of an idea so large the mind can hardly hold it . . . . If you seek to tune those numbered days of yours to what is most frightfully vital, you might carry this book in your satchel awhile. It’s tiny enough to conceal in a large pocket, but it thunders, and its seeds carry fields." —Image

      "Singular . . . stirring . . . invites pauses and contemplation. It is [Jernigan's] keen sense of what is essential that guides . . . these meditations." —Hamilton Review of Books

      "An elegant little book . . . Jernigan crafts pithy yet piercing poems that echo in the mind."—Canadian Literature

      "Vespers. Devotional. Breathtakingly sparse. Elegant. Wondrous. Moving. Rare." — Jeff Kirby, knife | fork | book

  • 10
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    How Fear Departed the Long Gallery A Ghost Story for Christmas E.F. Benson, Seth
    9781771961943 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:October 10, 2017
    $8.95 CAD 4 x 6 x 0.23 in | 60 gr | 52 pages Carton Quantity:156 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
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      Description

      Biblioasis is thrilled to continue this series of beautifully illustrated, collectible, classic Christmas ghost stories designed and illustrated by world-famous cartoonist Seth. In How Fear Departed the Long Gallery, for the Peverils, the appearance of a ghost is no more upsetting than the appearance of the mailman at an ordinary house. Except for the twin toddlers in the Long Gallery. No one would dare be caught in the Long Gallery after dark. But upon this quiet and cloudy afternoon, Madge Peveril is feeling rather drowsy ...

      Bio

      Edward Frederic "E. F." Benson (1867 – 1940) was a prolific English writer, most well-known for his series of Mapp & Lucia books and his ghost stories.

      Seth is the cartoonist behind the comic-book series Palookaville. His comics have a appeared in the New York Times magazine, Best American Comics, and McSweeney's Quarterly. His illustrations have appeared on the cover of The New Yorker, The Walrus, and CNQ.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Christmas Ghost Stories

      “[This] series of Christmas ghost stories, miniature books chosen and illustrated by the cartoonist Seth ... [offers] chills—and charm.”—John Williams, New York Times Book Review

      “I just bought my set of these and they ... are ... PERFECT. I hope they do these every year.”—Patton Oswalt

      “These are beautiful little books ... [My family’s] been reading them at home, and we’ve actually put them away so we can re-read them on Christmas Eve.”—Matt Galloway, CBC’s Metro Morning

      “For Seth, this is really a labour of love.”—Peter Robb, Ottawa Citizen

      “The two classic Christmas ghost stories that Seth and Biblioasis fashioned last year were a huge success for us. Nifty packaging, striking design—so Seth.”—Ben McNally, Ben McNally Books, Toronto, ON

      “Seth’s Christmas Ghost Stories series resurrects the legacy of fireside tales at Christmas with these beautifully illustrated editions.”—John Toews, McNally Robinson Booksellers, Winnipeg, MB

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