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UBC Press Fall 2018 Trade Catalogue, featuring selections from our distributed publishers

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  • 1
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    Truth and Conviction Donald Marshall Jr. and the Mi’kmaw Quest for Justice L. Jane McMillan Canada
    9780774837484 Hardcover LAW / Indigenous Peoples Publication Date:November 01, 2018
    $34.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.8 in | 480 gr | 230 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      The name “Donald Marshall Jr.” is synonymous with “wrongful conviction” and the fight for Indigenous rights in Canada. In Truth and Conviction, Jane McMillan – Marshall’s former partner, an acclaimed anthropologist, and an original defendant in the Supreme Court’s Marshall decision – tells the story of how Marshall’s life-long battle against injustice permeated Canadian legal consciousness and revitalized Indigenous law. Marshall died in 2009, but his legacy lives on. Mi’kmaq continue to assert their rights and build justice programs grounded in customary laws and practices, key steps in the path to self-determination and reconciliation.
      Bio
      L. Jane McMillan is the former Canada Research Chair for Indigenous Peoples and Sustainable Communities and chair of the Department of Anthropology at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia. A former eel fisher and one of the original defendants in the Supreme Court of Canada’s Marshall decision (1999), she has worked with Mi’kmaw communities for over twenty years, conducting ethnographic research, developing policy, and advocating for Indigenous and treaty rights and for community-based justice.
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      Awards
      Atlantic Book Awards, Atlantic Book Awards and Festival 2020, Winner
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  • 2
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    Our Voices Must Be Heard Women and the Vote in Ontario Tarah Brookfield Canada
    9780774860192 Hardcover HISTORY / Women Publication Date:November 01, 2018
    $27.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.75 in | 440 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      In 1844, seven widows dared to cast ballots in an election in Canada West, a display of feminist effrontery that was quickly punished: the government struck a law excluding women from the vote. It would be seven decades before women regained voting rights in Ontario. Our Voices Must Be Heard explores Ontario’s suffrage history, examining its ideals and failings, its daring supporters and thunderous enemies, and its blind spots on matters of race and class. It looks at how and why suffragists from around the province joined an international movement they called “the great cause.”

      This is the second volume in the seven-part Women’s Suffrage and the Struggle for Democracy series.

      Bio
      Tarah Brookfield is an associate professor of history and youth and children’s studies at Wilfrid Laurier University. She is the author of Cold War Comforts: Canadian Women, Child Safety, and Global Insecurity, a finalist for the Canada Prize for the Social Sciences. She has contributed chapters to edited collections and published articles in journals such as the Canadian Historical Review and the Journal of the Canadian Historical Association.
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      Awards
      Alison Prentice Award for Best Book in Ontario Women's and Gender History, Ontario Historical Society 2018, Winner
      Reviews
  • 3
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    Red Light Labour Sex Work Regulation, Agency, and Resistance Elya M. Durisin Canada, Emily van der Meulen Canada, Chris Bruckert Canada
    9780774838245 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Prostitution & Sex Trade Publication Date:September 01, 2018
    $34.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 600 gr | 392 pages Carton Quantity:18 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      In 2013, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled in Canada v. Bedford that key prostitution laws were unconstitutional. Red Light Labour addresses the new legal regime regulating sex work by analyzing how laws and those who uphold them have constructed, controlled, and criminalized sex workers, their clients, and their workspaces. This groundbreaking collection also offers nuanced interpretations of commercial sexual labour from the perspectives of workers, activists, and researchers. The contributors highlight the struggle for civic and social inclusion by considering sex workers’ advocacy tactics, successes, and challenges. A timely legal, policy, and social analysis of sex work in Canada.
      Bio
      Elya M. Durisin holds a PhD in political science from York University. With Emily van der Meulen and Victoria Love, she is the editor of Selling Sex: Experience, Advocacy, and Research on Sex Work in Canada. Emily van der Meulen is an associate professor of criminology at Ryerson University. Her edited works include, with Robert Heynen, Expanding the Gaze: Gender and the Politics of Surveillance. Chris Bruckert is a professor of criminology at the University of Ottawa. She is the author of Taking It Off, Putting It On: Women in the Strip Trade and has edited several works, among them, with Colette Parent, Getting Past “the Pimp”: Management in the Sex Industry.
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      A thorough collection, it challenges misconceptions and educates readers on many topics, including sex work in rural and small communities, the experience of Indigenous workers, and union engagement with sex work in Canada.

  • 4
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    Live at The Cellar Vancouver’s Iconic Jazz Club and the Canadian Co-operative Jazz Scene in the 1950s and ‘60s Marian Jago, Don Thompson
    9780774837699 Paperback MUSIC / History & Criticism Publication Date:October 15, 2018
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.82 in | 540 gr | 364 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      In the 1950s and ’60s, co-operative jazz clubs opened their doors in Canada in response to new forms of jazz expression emerging after the war and the lack of performance spaces outside major urban centres. Operated by the musicians themselves, these hip new clubs created spaces where jazz musicians practised their art. Live at the Cellar looks at this unique period in the development of jazz in Canada. Centered on Vancouver’s legendary Cellar club, it explores the ways in which these clubs functioned as sites for the performance and exploration of jazz as well as for countercultural expression. Jago combines original research with archival evidence, interviews, and photographs to shine a light on a period of astonishing musical activity that paved the way for Canada’s vibrant jazz scene today.
      Bio
      Marian Jago, originally from Canada’s west coast, is now a lecturer in popular music and jazz studies at the University of Edinburgh. She has published frequently on a wide variety of jazz topics for the Journal of Jazz Studies, Jazz Perspectives, Jazz Research Journal, Routledge, Bloomsbury, and others. Some of her recent work looks at the relationship of jazz to the writing of Jack Kerouac, the jazz economy of New York in the 1960s, and extended studio techniques versus “liveness” in jazz recordings. She also maintains an active interest in the Canadian jazz scene as well as the music and pedagogical practices of Lee Konitz and Lennie Tristano.
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      [...]The way Jago sets the stage to explain how and why a musician-run, co-operative jazz venue emerged at this specific time in Vancouver, as in several other places, provides a fascinating window into Canadian history.

      Live at the Cellar deserves an audience beyond jazz aficionados: in a town that tends to endlessly reinvent the wheel, it tells how the first wheel was forged.


      With verve and insight, Veronica Strong-Boag’s account of Laura Jamieson challenges many widely held myths. The book shows how a seemingly conformist, middle-class matron became an unstinting champion of social change – including women’s enfranchisement, birth control, and social democracy. The Last Suffragist Standing is a stunning accomplishment, notably for its fresh and compelling twist on Canadian political history.

      Jago’s book is a sparkler. It shows how a small group of believers can make real change and quietly kick ass to boot. Bless ’em all! ... This is Vancouver’s book of the year, hands down.


      Good books on jazz are filled with intriguing stories about the relationships that generate such an energizing art form. This book is that, and more. The more is a carefully considered framework for making sense of the social dynamics that create a jazz scene. Put the stories into the framework and you’ve got a must-read book.

      Marian Jago has performed a genuine service in capturing one of the places that did exist [in the early jazz scene], with a diligently researched and amiably written study of a unique time and place in Vancouver’s musical past.


      Live at the Cellar deserves an audience beyond jazz aficionados … It’s wonderful to hear about the early days of such significant cultural figures … but what really should be taken away from this book is that scenes such as theirs are what produce culture, and as such deserve more civic and media support than they presently get.


      Good books on jazz are filled with intriguing stories about the relationships that generate such an energizing art form. This book is that, and more. The more is a carefully considered framework for making sense of the social dynamics that create a jazz scene. Put the stories into the framework and you’ve got a must-read book.
  • 5
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    Birds of Nunavut James M. Richards, Anthony J. Gaston
    9780774860246 Hardcover NATURE / Animals Publication Date:August 15, 2018
    $125.00 CAD 8.5 x 11 x 2.3 in | 3500 gr | 820 pages Carton Quantity:4 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      Nunavut is a land of islands, encompassing some of the most remote places on Earth. It is also home to some of the world’s most fascinating bird species. Birds of Nunavut is the first complete survey of every species known to occur in the territory. Co-written by a team of eighteen experts, it documents 295 species of birds (of which 145 are known to breed there), presenting a wealth of information on identification, distribution, ecology, behaviour, and conservation. Lavishly illustrated with over 800 colour photographs and 155 maps, this is a visually stunning reference work on the birds that live in and visit Nunavut.

      Bio

      James M. Richards is a self-taught naturalist and award-winning wildlife photographer. He has travelled extensively throughout Canada, the US, Central and South America, and East Africa to study birds and other wildlife. He spent 14 summers in Nunavut and 8 summers in Churchill, Manitoba, observing birds. He has received numerous awards for his work on birds, conservation, and the environment, including an Environmental Citizenship Award, a Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal, the Ontario Medal for Good Citizenship, and a Distinguished Ornithologist award from the Ontario Field Ornithologists.

      Anthony J. Gaston is a naturalist, ornithologist, and ecologist who, as a senior research scientist with Environment Canada, has studied Nunavut birds since 1975. He specializes in the study of marine birds in the Arctic and Haida Gwaii, particularly the impact of climate change on them. He has received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Pacific Seabird Group, the Doris Huestis Speirs Award for Outstanding Contributions to Canadian Ornithology, and the Jamie Smith Mentoring Award from the Society of Canadian Ornithologists.

      Birds of Nunavut is written by a team of academics, government researchers, and independent environmental consultants who have not only carried out extensive ornithological studies in Nunavut but are also avid birders: Kenneth F. Abraham, Geoffrey Carpentier, Alastair Franke, Anthony J. Gaston, Gilles Gauthier, Victoria H. Johnston, Richard W. Knapton, Myles M. Lamont, James O. Leafloor, Mark L. Mallory, Robert D. Montgomerie, Mark K. Peck, Jennie Rausch, James M. Richards, Gregory J. Robertson, Paul A. Smith, Jean-François Therrien, and Y. Robert Tymstra.

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  • 6
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    Memory Philippe Tortell, Mark Turin, Margot Young
    9781775276609 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Essays Publication Date:October 01, 2018
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.6 in | 370 gr | 268 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies
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      This book examines the character and relevance of remembrance, inviting readers to think creatively and deeply about the ways that memories are transmitted, recorded, and distorted through time and space. Ranging from molecular genetics and astrophysics to law and Indigenous oral histories, the essays draw from a diverse group of contributors to capture different perspectives on memory. Reflecting upon memory in engaging and unexpected ways, this collection offers an interdisciplinary roadmap for exploring how, why, and when we remember.
      Bio

      Philippe Tortell is director of the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, and a professor in the departments of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, and Botany. Mark Turin is an associate professor in the department of anthropology and First Nations and Endangered Languages. Margot Young is a professor in the Peter A. Allard School of Law. All the editors work at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, which is located on traditional, ancestral, and unceded x?m??k??y??m (Musqueam) territory.

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      ...the book is better suited for reflection than for focused study, but the essays read together effect a thought-provoking exploration of timely themes and enrich readers' understanding of memory in its many facets. | Summing Up: Recommended. Advanced undergraduates through faculty and professionals.


      ...the inclusion of interesting, accessible contributions from the sciences is one of the great strengths of the collection; they are refreshing reading for those of us more familiar with humanistic discussions of memory, and intriguing for the parallels and contrasts they suggest.
  • 7
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    9780774890045 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Political Publication Date:September 01, 2018
    $32.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1.3 in | 780 gr | 512 pages Carton Quantity:14 Canadian Rights: Y On Point Press
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      Bill Graham – Canada’s minister of foreign affairs and minister of defence during the tumultuous years following 9/11 – takes us on a personal journey from his Vancouver childhood to important behind-the-scenes moments in recent global history. With candour and wit, he recounts meetings with world leaders, contextualizes important geopolitical relationships, and offers acute observations on backstage politics. He explains Canada’s decision not to participate in the 2003 invasion of Iraq and makes a passionate case for why international law offers the best hope for a safer, more prosperous, and just world.

      Bio
      Bill Graham served as a member of Parliament, chair of the House of Commons foreign affairs committee, minister of foreign affairs, minister of national defence, leader of the Official Opposition, and interim leader of the Liberal Party of Canada. He holds a BA and LLB from the University of Toronto and a doctorate (Sciences juridiques) from the Université de Paris. Prior to his election to Parliament in 1993, Graham practised law at Fasken & Calvin and subsequently taught international trade law, public international law, and the law of the European Community at the University of Toronto, McGill University, and the Université de Montréal. In 1985, the French government appointed him a chevalier de la légion d’honneur for his promotion of the French language in Canada. In 2014, he became a member of the Order of Canada in recognition of his contributions to Canadian politics.
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      Awards
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      With the Liberal party back in government after an eleven-year run by Stephen Harper’s Conservatives, we are seeing many figures who served Liberal governments throughout the 1990s and early 2000s returning in advisory capacities. One of those is Bill Graham, who was variably Foreign Affairs Minister, Minister of Defence and interim leader of the Liberal Party. While he might be unfamiliar to a new generation of voters, his autobiography The Call of the World, gives insight into Graham the politician and the inner workings of the Liberal governments under former prime ministers Paul Martin and Jean Chretien.


      One of the more revealing memoirs by a Canadian politician to come along.


      Graham’s “political memoir” The Call of the World is not only one of the best autobiographies ever produced by a Canadian politician, it is a deeply informed and insightful commentary on Canada’s international relations, both in policy and practice, as well as a passionate positive appeal for active citizenship from the local to the global.


      Well written, and leavened with ample doses of humor and insight, The Call of the World is above all a frank and compelling account of one policymaker’s efforts to reconcile our highest legal and human rights ideals with the real world. However imperfect, it’s a record worth celebrating.

      [A]mong the most profound writing of any postwar Canadian politician … To read The Call Of The World is to sense a nagging conscience and sleepless nights … Graham is sincere and forthright … [He] deserves credit for plain honesty in a political memoir that breaks the mold of self-serving platitudes.


      Bill Graham was foreign minister in 2003 when Canada infuriated George W. Bush by refusing to join his “coalition of the willing” and invade lraq. In The Call of the World Graham reveals the intense pressure that Bush put on Jean Chrétien, the prime minister, who turned down the president’s request to come to Ottawa and make his case in person. Canadians, who often feel bullied by their powerful neighbour, are entranced.


      The Call of the World includes a good deal of interesting information about the nuts and bolts of electoral politics in this country and how they are changing.

      Bill Graham’s political memoir, The Call of the World, provides a window seat to some of the most important domestic and foreign events of the past quarter century in a candid and colourful way.


      I was in the Parliamentary Press Gallery for The Globe and Mail during the whole of Graham’s elected career and wrote about him from time to time. But I have to admit that I came away from his book with a greater appreciation of his gravitas and accomplishments than I reflected in my stories at the time – indeed the whole gallery underestimated him. If we had paid more attention to him and done our homework, the Canadian public would have been better informed.


      It is rare when former politicians fail to use every word, sentence, and chapter of their memoirs to justify their decisions, to explain how they were either misunderstood or unheeded when things went wrong, and how their superior sense and profound understanding of what was necessary prevailed when things went right. It is precisely this rarity that makes The Call of the World: A Political Memoir so readable and unique.

  • 8
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    Trudeaumania Paul Litt Canada
    9780774834056 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Popular Culture Publication Date:November 01, 2018
    $32.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 1 in | 620 gr | 424 pages Carton Quantity:16 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      In 1968, Canadians dared to take a chance on a new kind of politician. Pierre Trudeau became the leader of the Liberal Party in April and two months later won the federal election. His meteoric rise to power was driven by Trudeaumania, an explosive mix of passion and fear fueled by media hype and nationalist ambition. This book traces what happened when the fabled spirit of the sixties met the excitement of the Centennial and Expo 67. Canadians wanted to modernize their nation, differentiate it from the US, and defuse Quebec separatism. Far from being a sixties crazy moment, Trudeaumania was a passionate quest for a new Canada that would define the values of Canadians for decades to come.
      Bio
      Paul Litt is a professor in the Department of History and the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa. His research explores the intersection of culture, nationalism, and the mass media in twentieth-century Canada. He is the author of several books, including The Muses, the Masses and the Massey Commission and Elusive Destiny: The Political Vocation of John Napier Turner.
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      Awards
      CHA Political History Group Best Book in Political History, Canadian Historical Association 2017, Winner
      Reviews

      Litt's advantage in this battle of competing interpretations is that his perspective is able to accommodate many factors, rather than emphasizing just one as Wright does … Trudeau's brilliance was that he could master the lecture hall and the TV screen. Appreciating such multiple talents fits more easily into Litt’s account of him than Wright's.


      [A]s Paul Litt ably shows in this magnificent study of a pivotal moment, the original Trudeaumania was much more than throngs of adoring fans, a celebrity politician, and an election victory … This book looks beyond the psychedelic colours and trippy slogans of the 1968 campaign into a much larger and more profound set of cultural and ideational shifts that were occurring in Canada in the late 1960s. Doing so through the lens of the Trudeau moment – for which there seems to be a certain nostalgia today – gives shape and structure to what might have been, in less able hands, a somewhat inchoate inventory of cultural crises. Paul Litt has performed a bit of magic here, giving shape and substance to the smoke and mirrors of an ephemeral 1960s culture.


      …it is Paul Litt’s book, simply titled Trudeaumania, that fully embraces the idea of Trudeau as the saviour Canadians had been hankering for in the wake of upheavals catalyzed by separatism and the’60s. Unquestionably, he arrived on the scene at a propitious time.
      Litt’s Trudeaumania is about sex, sizzle and popular culture. Sex, he writes, had become the central obsession of a pop culture, which 'exploited its power to titillate and sensationalize. Trudeaumania derived much of its sizzle from the sex-obsessiveness and sexism of the time.' It was the time of sexual liberation, Beatlemania and Andy Warhol … both Trudeaumania books are well researched and well written. If you’re more interested in the cultural phenomenon that was Trudeaumania, that’s what Litt offers.

      Unlike other literature that examines the controversial leader, Trudeaumania probes beyond Trudeau’s identity, investigating his public image within the context of the 1960s … This account of Trudeaumania is the best study of the phenomenon to date. … Trudeaumania is a must-read for scholars interested in the sixties, counterculture and protest movements, Canadian nationalism, as well as federal politics and Pierre Trudeau.


      Nearly a generation after his death, Liberals still speak of the age of Trudeau. The facts are even better than the myth.
      By showing that Trudeau’s first election was not the overwhelming mandate that those still under the Trudeaumania spell might recall, Litt provides a solid antidote to rose-colored views of Canada’s ’60s and one of its most iconic leaders.

      This well-written and well-researched book is the best on the Trudeau phenomenon. Summing Up: Essential.


      We may be living through Trudeaumania 2.0 right now, but there are still opportunities to dig deeper into what the first version was all about.
  • 9
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    9780774880015 Paperback POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy Publication Date:September 01, 2018
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.7 in | 500 gr | 348 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Purich Books
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      Canadian politicians, like many of their circumpolar counterparts, brag about their country’s “Arctic identity” or “northern character,” but what do they mean, exactly? Stereotypes abound, from Dudley Do-Right to Northern Exposure, but these southern perspectives fail to capture northern realities. During decades of service as a legislator, mediator, and negotiator, Tony Penikett witnessed a new northern consciousness grow out of the challenges of the Cold War, climate change, land rights struggles, and the boom and bust of resource megaprojects. His lively account of clashes and accommodations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous leaders not only retraces the footsteps of his hunt for a northern identity but tells the story of an Arctic that the world does not yet know.

      Bio
      Tony Penikett spent twenty-five years in public life, including two years in the House of Commons as chief of staff to federal NDP leader Ed Broadbent, five terms in the Yukon Legislative Assembly, and two terms as premier of Yukon Territory. His government negotiated settlements of Yukon First Nation land claims and passed pioneering legislation in the areas of education, health, and language. It also organized Yukon 2000, a unique bottom-up economic-planning process. Between 1997 and 2001, he served as deputy minister of negotiations and, later, as deputy minister of labour for the BC government. He is the author of one book, Reconciliation: First Nations Treaty Making in British Columbia, and two films, The Mad Trapper and La Patrouille Perdue.
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      There are tantalizing snippets of memoir in this book—Penikett is an excellent writer, and there’s one especially lovely description of his presence as honorary pallbearer at his former mother-in-law’s funeral and potlatch. But it is largely a comprehensive review of issues such as governance, international relations (a history and critique of the Arctic Council), resource management, climate change, and social issues like poverty, education, and health. Chapters on climate change, the “hungry ghost,” and the complex issue of sovereignty are especially good, as Penikett honours traditional knowledge (known colloquially as TK), and the slow integration of traditional knowledge into scientific research and analysis in the Arctic.


      Hunting The Northern Character is an eloquent appeal to end condescending treatment of the one uniquely Canada region best known to the outside world.


      This is an insider’s view of Canada’s North and the Arctic world generally, informed by decades of experience in all aspects of northern life – social, environmental, and economic. It is astonishingly wide-ranging and comprehensive in its approach to topics, as well as lighthearted and anecdotal. It is difficult to think of anyone who knows more, or as much, about this subject as Penikett, which makes his book indispensable reading for anyone interested in the North.

      Summing Up: Essential.

  • 10
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    9780774836586 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies Publication Date:September 01, 2018
    $32.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.8 in | 360 gr | 236 pages Carton Quantity:30 Canadian Rights: Y UBC Press
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      Storytelling has the capacity to address feelings and demonstrate themes – to illuminate beyond argument and theoretical exposition. In Otter’s Journey, Borrows makes use of the Anishinaabe tradition of storytelling to explore how the work in Indigenous language revitalization can inform the emerging field of Indigenous legal revitalization. She follows Otter, a dodem (clan) relation from the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation, on a journey across Anishinaabe, Inuit, Maori, Coast Salish, and Abenaki territories, through a narrative of Indigenous resurgence. In doing so, she reveals that the processes, philosophies, and practices flowing from Indigenous languages and laws can emerge from under the layers of colonial laws, policies, and languages to become guiding principles in people’s contemporary lives.
      Bio
      Lindsay Keegitah Borrows is a staff lawyer at West Coast Environmental Law in Vancouver. She is Anishinaabe and a member of the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation in Ontario. Each fall in her home territory she helps run land-based Indigenous legal education camps for Ontario law schools. She has been a researcher at the Pascua Yaqui Tribal Court in Arizona, the United Nations, and the University of Victoria Indigenous Law Research Unit. She is a recipient of the Law Foundation of British Columbia Public Interest Award.
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      Awards
      Indigenous Literature Award, Southern Ontario Library Service 2019, Short-listed
      Reviews

      [T]he evocative language which Borrows offers in her telling of the creation story in her introduction, in her enmeshing of the realities of language revitalization in Canada and New Zealand in Chapter Three, and especially, I find, in her experiences in the Salish Sea in Chapter Five, talking with Raven, serves to make real for me as a reader the power of the stories as conduits to ecologically, linguistically, and legally precise truths.

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