First Nation Communities Read 2018/19

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  • 1
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    The Water Walker Bilingual edition Joanne Robertson Canada
    9781772600384 Hardcover JUVENILE NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 6 - 9, Grade (CAN) from 1 - 3, Grade (US) from 1 - 3, Reading age from 6 - 9 Publication Date:September 05, 2017
    $16.95 CAD 7 x 8.5 x 0.4 in | 296 gr | 36 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Second Story Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The story of a determined Ojibwe Grandmother (Nokomis) Josephine-ba Mandamin and her great love for Nibi (water). Nokomis walks to raise awareness of our need to protect Nibi for future generations, and for all life on the planet. She, along with other women, men, and youth, have walked around all the Great Lakes from the four salt waters, or oceans, to Lake Superior. The walks are full of challenges, and by her example Josephine-ba invites us all to take up our responsibility to protect our water, the giver of life, and to protect our planet for all generations.
      Bio
      Joanne Robertson is AnishinaabeKwe and a member of Atikameksheng Anishnawbek. She received her Fine Arts degree from Algoma University and Shingwauk Kinoomaage Gamig. She founded the Empty Glass for Water campaign to bring attention to the drinking water crisis in Indigenous communities. She works as a research assistant at the Shingwauk Residential Schools Centre and continues to support the water walks. Joanne lives near Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Ontario Library Association's 2018 Best Bets 2018, Commended
      2018 (Spring) - Canadian Children's Book Centre's Best Books for Kids and Teens 2018, Commended
      Indigenous Voices Awards 2018, Short-listed
      AICL's Best Books of 2017 - American Indians in Children's Literature 2017, Commended
      First Nation Communities READ Indigenous Literature Award - Children’s Category 2018, Winner
      Reviews
      An important topic is treated with grace, love, and a smidgen of humor in this delightful, necessary book.
      ... a worthwhile addition to classroom and public libraries and a resource for discussions about First Nations and ecology.
      ... like so many titles about Indigenous topics finally earning shelf space in Canadian libraries and bookshops, “The Water Walker” has just as much to teach parents as the children... Joanne Robertson succeeds in answering with her words and her art the same question that Nokomis Josephine answered with her footsteps: “What are you going to do about it?”
      Josephine Mandamin has inspired countless adults to care passionately about protecting the waters of the earth. Now through Joanne Robertson's magical book, Josephine will inspire children to know they can change the world.
      Joanne Roberston reconstructs Josephine's remarkable story with simple prose and colourful illustrations that will appeal to young readers.
      The Water Walker is a wonderful book about conservation, environmentalism, and preservation, written in a way that even the youngest audience can understand why Nibi is important and why we should protect Nibi.... The book has the potential to be a highly interactive book around which science lesson plans could be formed. Students can discuss how they are protecting Nibi, they can write letters to Nokomis, and there can be discussion around the ways they can create change in the world, just as Nokomis did.
      It is the epitome of #OwnVoices.... Robertson turned Mandamin's work into an engaging story that invites children to learn about her activism.... The Water Walker is an extraordinary book.
      With a message that is both timely and timeless, The Water Walker... will prove to be an enduringly popular addition to family, preschool, elementary school, and community library collections.
      [The author’s] artwork in this picture book is colorful and accessible for readers, and she gives readers a solid inspirational story on a critical topic while even adding in a bit of humor…This book would be a good addition to a school or public library, and it would also be a good addition to text sets or lessons about conservation efforts or natural resources or Native Americans.
      "The simple text and colourful pictures are the perfect medium to convey the urgency of the Water Walkers' initiative. Teachers and students can use [the] story to park and ignite their own activism around water protection."
  • 2
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    When We Were Alone David A. Robertson Canada, Julie Flett Canada
    9781553796732 Hardcover JUVENILE FICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 4 - 8, Grade (US) from K - 3 Publication Date:December 01, 2016
    $19.95 CAD 203.2 x 215.9 x 6.35 mm | 260 gr | 25 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y HighWater Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      When a young girl helps tend to her grandmother’s garden, she begins to notice things that make her curious. Why does her grandmother have long, braided hair and beautifully coloured clothing? Why does she speak another language and spend so much time with her family? As she asks her grandmother about these things, she is told about life in a residential school a long time ago, where all of these things were taken away. When We Were Alone is a story about a difficult time in history, and, ultimately, one of empowerment and strength.

      Also available in a bilingual Swampy Cree/English edition.

      When We Were Alone won the 2017 Governor General's Literary Award in the Young People's Literature (Illustrated Books) category, and was nominated for the TD Canadian's Children's Literature Award.

      Bio
      David A. Robertson is an award-winning writer. His books include When We Were Alone (winner Governor General’s Literary Award), Will I See? (winner Manuela Dias Book Design and Illustration Award Graphic Novel Category), Betty, The Helen Betty Osborne Story (listed In The Margins), and the YA novel Strangers. David educates as well as entertains through his writings about Indigenous Peoples in Canada, reflecting their cultures, histories, communities, as well as illuminating many contemporary issues. David is a member of Norway House Cree Nation. He lives in Winnipeg.

      Julie Flett is an award-winning Cree-Metis author, illustrator and artist. She has received many awards, including the 2016 American Indian Library Association Award for Best Picture Book for Little You, written by Richard Van Camp (Orca Books), and the Canadian Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Award in 2015 for Dolphins SOS, written by Roy Miki (Tradewind Books) and in 2017 for My Heart Fills with Happiness, written by Monique Gray Smith (Orca Books), and was nominated for the Governor General’s Award for Children’s Literature for her book Owls See Clearly at Night (Lii Yiiboo Nayaapiwak lii Swer): A Michif Alphabet (L’alphabet di Michif). Her own Wild Berries (Simply Read Books) was chosen as Canada's First Nation Communities Read title selection for 2014-2015.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Robertson’s soft rhythmic text and Julie Flett’s simple, yet expressive, illustrations combine to create a beautiful story of strength and resistance. The muted colours used in the pictures of residential school life remind readers of the suffering endured by Indigenous children. The contrast between these pages, and the vibrant greens, reds, and blues of the illustrations depicting residential school students temporarily escaping into nature, is heartbreakingly effective. Robertson never tries to disguise the underlying tragedy of Nókom’s experience, but together he and Flett have crafted a book that is still suitable for younger readers, in spite of the intense subject matter.

      When We Were Alone is an incredible work of art and is very highly recommended.


      A quiet story…of love and resistance.… Flett’s collage illustrations, with their simplicity and earthy colors, are soulful and gentle…. All readers will connect with how Nókom lives in celebration of colors, her long hair, her language, and, most of all, her family.

      When We Were Alone is rare. It is exquisite and stunning, for the power conveyed by the words Robertson wrote, and for the illustrations that Flett created. I highly recommend it.

      …Robertson handles a delicate task here admirably well: explaining residential schools, that shameful legacy, and making them understandable to small children. It’s a dark history, and the author doesn’t disguise that, but he wisely focuses the grandmother’s tale on how, season by season, the students use creativity, imagination, and patience to retain their sense of identity. A beautifully quiet, bold strength arises from the continued refrain “When we were alone” and in how the children insisted on being themselves. Flett’s gorgeous, skillful illustrations have a flattened, faux naïve feel to them, like construction paper collage, a style that works perfectly with the story. She nicely contrasts the school’s dull browns and grays with the riotous colors surrounding Nókom and gets much expression from her simple silhouettes.

      Spare, poetic, and moving, this Cree heritage story makes a powerful impression.


      Julie’s Flett’s illustrations are impeccable. The contrast between the colourful and bleak illustrations perfectly match the narrative. The relatively small size of the book makes it perfect for sharing with younger children.

      When We Were Alone addresses the topic of residential schools and, just as importantly, aspects of Cree culture and language. There is such gentleness about When We Were Alone that makes it an appropriate book for the even youngest of readers. Simply put, this is a much-needed book.

      Highly Recommended.


      Robertson's text moves between the present and the past, the girl's questions and Nókom's memories, which deepen and intensify the quiet, powerful way she lives out her own culture, day by day, in the present. A beautifully rendered story of resisitance and love, this is made all the more luminous by Flett's art - not just by flashes of fuschsia or scarlet among ochre grasses, but by her precisely observed images of the compact bodies of the uniformed children, bowed beneath the weight of the scissors, or lovingly tending each other's hair. Highly recommended.

      Flett's spring palette of warm blues and browns punctuated with splashes of red contrasts the loving moments between grandmother and granddaughter with stark winter whites and grays depicting boarding school life. The repetitive structure creates a predictable narrative; together the illustrations and Robertson's child-centred text make the boarding school experience accessible to a young audience without glossing over its harshness. Verdict: a poignant family story covering a part of history too often missing from library collections.
  • 3
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    Akilak's Adventure English Edition Deborah Kigjugalik Webster Canada, Charlene Chua Canada
    9781772271232 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Action & Adventure Age (years) from 5 - 7 Publication Date:October 21, 2016
    $10.95 CAD 9 x 7 x 0.15 in | 132 gr | 32 pages Carton Quantity:96 Canadian Rights: Y Inhabit Media
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      When Akilak must travel a great distance to another camp to gather food, she thinks she will never be able to make it. With a little help from her grandmother's spirit, and her own imagination to keep her entertained, Akilak manages to turn a long journey into an adventure.

      Even though she at first feels that she will never be able to reach her destination, she keeps her grandmother's assurance that her "destination is not running away; it will be reached eventually" in mind and ends up enjoying the journey that at first seemed so daunting.

      Bio
      Deborah Kigjugalik Webster grew up in Baker Lake, Nunavut, where she loved to learn about her Inuit culture and heritage. She has a degree in Anthropology from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, and works as an Inuit heritage researcher and author. The lack of published children’s literature featuring Inuit content compelled Deborah to write Akilak’s Adventure for her daughters, Sonja Akilak and Nicole Amaruq. Reading and making up stories with her daughters when they were young was a magical time in Deborah’s life, and she took inspiration from their vivid imaginations and sense of wonderment and excitement.

      Charlene Chua worked as a web designer, senior graphic designer, web producer, and interactive project manager before she decided to pursue illustration as a career. Her work has appeared in American Illustration, Spectrum, and SILA’s Illustration West, as well as several art books. She illustrated the children’s picture books Julie Black Belt: The Kung Fu Chronicles and Julie Black Belt: The Belt of Fire. She lives in Hamilton, Ontario, with her husband and two cats.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Canadian Children's Book Centre Best Books for Kids and Teens 2017
      Reviews
      “. . . Akilak’s Adventure is a worthy addition to school and public library collections.”
      “An engaging and recommended read-aloud for all collections.”
      “Akilak’s Adventure has timeless teachings about responsibility and the importance of imagination to make it a worthwhile read now and always.”
  • 4
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    Akilak's Adventure Inuktitut Inuktitut Edition Deborah Kigjugalik Webster Canada, Charlene Chua Canada
    9781772271508 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Action & Adventure Age (years) from 5 - 7 Publication Date:March 22, 2017
    $10.95 CAD 9 x 7 x 0.2 in | 132 gr | 32 pages Carton Quantity:110 Canadian Rights: Y Inhabit Media
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      When Akilak must travel a great distance to another camp to gather food, she thinks she will never be able to make it. With a little help from her grandmother's spirit, and her own imagination to keep her entertained, Akilak manages to turn a long journey into an adventure.

      Even though she at first feels that she will never be able to reach her destination, she keeps her grandmother's assurance that her "destination is not running away; it will be reached eventually" in mind and ends up enjoying the journey that at first seemed so daunting.

      Bio
      Deborah Kigjugalik Webster grew up in Baker Lake, Nunavut, where she loved to learn about her Inuit culture and heritage. She has a degree in Anthropology from Carleton University in Ottawa, Ontario, and works as an Inuit heritage researcher and author. The lack of published children’s literature featuring Inuit content compelled Deborah to write Akilak’s Adventure for her daughters, Sonja Akilak and Nicole Amaruq. Reading and making up stories with her daughters when they were young was a magical time in Deborah’s life, and she took inspiration from their vivid imaginations and sense of wonderment and excitement.

      Charlene Chua worked as a web designer, senior graphic designer, web producer, and interactive project manager before she decided to pursue illustration as a career. Her work has appeared in American Illustration, Spectrum, and SILA’s Illustration West, as well as several art books. She illustrated the children’s picture books Julie Black Belt: The Kung Fu Chronicles and Julie Black Belt: The Belt of Fire. She lives in Hamilton, Ontario, with her husband and two cats.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “. . . Akilak’s Adventure is a worthy addition to school and public library collections.”
      “An engaging and recommended read-aloud for all collections.”
      “Akilak’s Adventure has timeless teachings about responsibility and the importance of imagination to make it a worthwhile read now and always.”
  • 5
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    My Heart Fills With Happiness / sâkaskinêw nitêh miywêyihtamowin ohci Dual language (English & Plains Cree) Monique Gray Smith Canada, Julie Flett Canada, Mary Cardinal Collins Canada, Cree Literary Network Canada
    9781459820180 Paperback JUVENILE FICTION / Social Themes Grade (CAN) from P - K, Grade (US) from P - K, Reading age from 3 - 5 Publication Date:September 18, 2018
    $6.95 CAD 7 x 7 x 0.13 in | 80 gr | 24 pages Carton Quantity:160 Canadian Rights: Y Orca Book Publishers
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The sun on your face. The smell of warm bannock baking in the oven. Holding the hand of someone you love. What fills your heart with happiness? This beautiful board book, with illustrations from celebrated artist Julie Flett, serves as a reminder for little ones and adults alike to reflect on and cherish the moments in life that bring us joy.

      International speaker and award-winning author Monique Gray Smith wrote My Heart Fills with Happiness to support the wellness of Indigenous children and families, and to encourage young children to reflect on what makes them happy.

      Orca Book Publishers is pleased to offer this paperback as a dual-language (English and Plains Cree) edition.
      Bio
      Monique Gray Smith is a mixed-heritage woman of Cree, Lakota and Scottish ancestry and a proud mom of twins. Monique is an accomplished consultant, writer and international speaker. Her first novel, Tilly: A Story of Hope and Resilience, won the 2014 Burt Award for First Nations, Métis and Inuit Literature. Monique and her family are blessed to live on Lekwungen territory in Victoria, British Columbia. For more information, visit www.littledrum.com.

      Julie Flett studied fine arts at Concordia University in Montreal and Emily Carr University of Art + Design in Vancouver. She received the Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Prize and was nominated for the Governor General's Award for Children's Literature for her book Owls See Clearly at Night: A Michif Alphabet / Lii Yiiboo Nayaapiwak lii Swer: L'alphabet di Michif. Julie is Cree-Métis and currently lives in Vancouver, British Columbia. For more information, visit julieflett.com. Follow her on Twitter @julie_flett.



      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Christie Harris Illustrated Children's Literature Prize 2017, Winner
      Bank Street College of Education Best Children's Books of the Year 2017, Commended
      Girls of Summer Reading List 2017, Commended
      Global Read Aloud 2018, Commended
      Indigenous Literature Award 2018, Short-listed
      CCBC Best Books for Kids & Teens 2019, Commended
      Reviews
      "It is a fantastic toddler book that celebrates family and heritage and would be valuable in any collection, especially those of First Nations heritage."
      "Specific visuals ground this sweet celebration of simple pleasures."
      "An excellent board book for every baby Canadian."
      "[A] light, warm and utterly charming book...Highly recommended for families, parents of young children to share with them and to begin conversation and sharing about emotions."
      ★ "Joyful and tender, this board book celebrates the activities that bring gladness through family and cultural connections...Flett's quietly powerful gouache and digital collage illustrations emphasize the relationships between people...The sweet family story has universal appeal. A first purchase for all libraries."
      "A celebration of aboriginal culture...but also universal in its message: sometimes it's the simplest things that lift our spirits highest...[The book] is beautiful in both its appearance and its intention."
      "A comforting board book offers young children the opportunity for reflection, and for affirmation, too. Moments of happiness tucked into each and every day celebrated here include time with family, self-expression, and the natural world."
      "A board book that leaves you feeling cheerful and appreciative of those small moments in life that bring one joy. Recommended."
      ? "A quiet loveliness, sense of gratitude, and—yes—happiness emanate from this tender celebration of simple pleasures, which features a cast of First Nations children and adults...Short, first-person phrases...revel in both solitary and familial activities...Flett's (Little You) crisp-edged paintings blend universal and culturally specific experiences."
  • 6
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    The Cloud Artist A Choctaw Tale Sherri Maret, Merisha Sequoia Clark
    9781937054748 Hardcover JUVENILE FICTION / People & Places Publication Date:November 09, 2017
    $23.95 CAD 10.75 x 8.75 x 0.3 in | 390 gr | 32 pages Carton Quantity:22 Canadian Rights: Y RoadRunner Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Born with the gift of painting with the clouds, Leona, a little Choctaw girl, uses the Oklahoma sky as her canvas to the delight of her people. When a traveling hawker hears about her talent and invites her to join the carnival, the Cloud Artist must make a decision about what kind of artist she wants to be.

      Bio

      An Oklahoma Choctaw, Sherri Maret is a former teacher and library media specialist who makes her home in Pennsylvania.

      Marketing & Promotion
  • 7
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    Seven Fallen Feathers Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City Tanya Talaga Canada
    9781487002268 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional Publication Date:September 30, 2017
    $22.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1 in | 460 gr | 376 pages Carton Quantity:33 Canadian Rights: Y House of Anansi Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The shocking true story covered by the Guardian and the New York Times of the seven young Indigenous students who were found dead in a northern Ontario city.

      In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.

      More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.

      Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities.

      A portion of each sale of Seven Fallen Feathers will go to the Dennis Franklin Cromarty Memorial Fund, set up in 1994 to financially assist Nishnawbe Aski Nation students’ studies in Thunder Bay and at post-secondary institutions. Further donations can be made to: http://www.cromartyfund.ca.

      Bio

      TANYA TALAGA is the acclaimed author of Seven Fallen Feathers, which was the winner of the RBC Taylor Prize, the Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing, and the First Nation Communities READ: Young Adult/Adult Award; a finalist for the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Nonfiction Prize and the BC National Award for Nonfiction; CBC’s Nonfiction Book of the Year, a Globe and Mail Top 100 Book, and a national bestseller. Talaga was the 2017–2018 Atkinson Fellow in Public Policy, the 2018 CBC Massey Lecturer, and author of the national bestseller All Our Relations: Finding The Path Forward. For more than twenty years she has been a journalist at the Toronto Star and is now a columnist at the newspaper. She has been nominated five times for the Michener Award in public service journalism. Talaga is of Polish and Indigenous descent. Her great-grandmother, Liz Gauthier, was a residential school survivor. Her great-grandfather, Russell Bowen, was an Ojibwe trapper and labourer. Her grandmother is a member of Fort William First Nation. Her mother was raised in Raith and Graham, Ontario. She lives in Toronto with her two teenage children.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction 2017, Short-listed
      B.C. National Award for Canadian Non-fiction 2018, Short-listed
      Speaker's Book Award 2017, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Praise for Tanya Talaga and Seven Fallen Feathers:

      Winner, 2018 RBC Taylor Prize
      Winner, 2017 Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing
      Winner, First Nation Communities Read Indigenous Literature Award
      Finalist, 2017 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction
      Finalist, 2017 Speaker’s Book Award
      Finalist, 2018 B.C. National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction
      A Best Book of the Decade, The Walrus
      An Indigo Best Book of the Decade
      A Globe And Mail Top 100 Book
      A National Post 99 Best Book of the Year

      “Talaga has written Canada’s J’Accuse, an open letter to the rest of us about the many ways we contribute — through act or inaction — to suicides and damaged existences in Canada’s Indigenous communities. Tanya Talaga’s account of teen lives and deaths in and near Thunder Bay is detailed, balanced and heart-rending. Talaga describes gaps in the system large enough for beloved children and adults to fall through, endemic indifference, casual racism and a persistent lack of resources. It is impossible to read this book and come away unchanged.” — RBC Taylor Prize Jury Citation“Tanya Talaga’s powerful book is a hard-hitting story of the realities of Canadian racism, complicity, and Indigenous suffering. It is also a testament to the resilience of the Anishinaabe families who endure the crushing impacts of historic and contemporary injustices. In spare prose and a direct voice, Talaga documents the tragedies of the lost lives of Indigenous youth while creating a compelling narrative that educates the reader on the sad history of Indigenous–White relations. This book is a crucial document of our times, and vital to the emergence of a true vision of justice in Canada.” — Shaughnessy Cohen Prize for Political Writing Jury Citation

      “In Seven Fallen Feathers, Tanya Talaga delves into the lives of seven Indigenous students who died while attending high school in Thunder Bay over the first eleven years of this century. With a narrative voice encompassing lyrical creation myth, razor-sharp reporting, and a searing critique of Canada’s ongoing colonial legacy, Talaga binds these tragedies — and the ambivalent response from police and government — into a compelling tapestry. This vivid, wrenching book shatters the air of abstraction that so often permeates news of the injustices Indigenous communities face every day. It is impossible to read Seven Fallen Feathers and not care about the lives lost, the families thrust into purgatory, while the rest of society looks away.” — Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction Jury Citation

      Seven Fallen Feathers is achingly blunt in confronting recurring damage that must be repaired. The book puts a human face to the headline statistics, reveals the continuing harm of unequal educational opportunity, and delivers the evidence of systemic racism in Canada with an insistent voice. Tanya Talaga draws the reader into communities of hurt and flawed responses surrounding the deaths of seven Indigenous students, the ‘fallen feathers.’ Talaga yanks at the reader’s complacency with her story of separated families, untethered youths, and the seemingly unbridgeable distance between cultures. She offers painful lessons while courting hope.” — BC National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction Jury Citation

      “You simply must read this book. Tanya Talaga has done the hard work for us. She sat with the families, heard their stories. Now, with the keen eye and meticulous research of an uncompromising journalist, she is sharing their truths. We have to start listening. Parents are sending their children to school in Thunder Bay to watch them die. Racism, police indifference, bureaucratic ineptitude, lateral violence — it doesn’t have to be this way. Let this book enrage you — and then demand that Canada act now.” — Duncan McCue, host of Cross Country Checkup on CBC Radio

      “This story is hard and harrowing, but Talaga tells it with the care of a storyteller and the factual attention of a journalist. She makes the difficult connections between this national tragedy and the greater colonial systems that have endangered our most vulnerable for over a century, and she does it all with a keen, compassionate eye for all involved, especially the families who are too often overlooked. These stories need to be heard. These young people deserve nothing less than to be honoured everywhere.” — Katherena Vermette, bestselling author of The Break

      Seven Fallen Feathers may prove to be the most important book published in Canada in 2017. Tanya Talaga offers well-researched, difficult truths that expose the systemic racism, poverty, and powerlessness that contribute to the ongoing issues facing Indigenous youth, their families, and their communities. It is a call to action that deeply honours the lives of the seven young people; our entire nation should feel their loss profoundly.” — Patti LaBoucane-Benson, author of The Outside Circle

      “Once started, this book is difficult to put down. At just over 300 pages, Seven Fallen Feathers moves from one compelling story to the next, and seamlessly weaves in facts and history. The writing is crisp and thoughtful. Seven Fallen Feathers . . . fosters understanding, and is a book that can benefit everyone.” — Ottawa Review of Books

      “[W]here Seven Fallen Feathers truly shines is in Talaga’s intimate retellings of what families experience when a loved one goes missing, from filing a missing-persons report with police, to the long and brutal investigation process, to the final visit in the coroner’s office. It’s a heartbreaking portrait of an indifferent and often callous system . . . Seven Fallen Feathers is a must-read for all Canadians. It shows us where we came from, where we’re at, and what we need to do to make the country a better place for us all.” — The Walrus

      “Devastating, angry, and thought-provoking” — Open Letters Monthly (blog review)

      “What is happening in Thunder Bay is particularly destructive, but Talaga makes clear how Thunder Bay is symptomatic, not the problem itself. Recently shortlisted for the Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction, Talaga’s is a book to be justly infuriated by.” — Globe and Mail

      “[A]n urgent and unshakable portrait of the horrors faced by Indigenous teens going to school in Thunder Bay, Ontario, far from their homes and families. . . . Talaga’s incisive research and breathtaking storytelling could bring this community one step closer to the healing it deserves.” — Booklist, STARRED REVIEW

      “Talaga’s research is meticulous and her journalistic style is crisp and uncompromising. . . . The book is heartbreaking and infuriating, both an important testament to the need for change and a call to action.” — Publishers Weekly, STARRED REVIEW

      “A poignant, emotional glimpse into the lives of the seven fallen feathers — Jethro Anderson, Curran Strang, Kyle Morriseau, Paul Panacheese, Reggie Bushie, Robyn Harper, and Jordan Wabasse — through the eyes of their friends and families.” — TBNewswatch

      Seven Fallen Feathers . . . is a must read. One can hope in Seven Fallen Feathers people in our community might find a path forward to true understanding and reconciliation.” — NetNewsLedger

      “This is a book that everyone should read. . . . [it] will grip you, make you think and help you understand better what has led up to the horrific experiences of young people cut down too soon. It connects the local experience to the larger experience of Canada and is a cry for justice, human rights and respect.” — The Chronicle Journal

      Talaga’s work brings stories to the fore when mainstream media have covered them up for decades . . . Seven Fallen Feathers is a difficult read. It deals with death and racism; it tackles pain and suffering head on. Telling the students’ stories is also an act of hope and healing based on the certainty that things can be better, and that they must. This book is a solid piece of investigative journalism and should be read, and shared far and wide.” — Citizens’ Press

      “Tanya Talaga investigates the deaths of seven Indigenous teens in Thunder Bay — Jethro Anderson, Curran Strang, Robyn Harper, Paul Panacheese, Reggie Bushie, Kyle Morrisseau, and Jordan Wabasse — searching for answers and offering a deserved censure to the authorities who haven’t investigated, or considered the contributing factors, nearly enough.” — National Post

  • 8
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    #NotYourPrincess Voices of Native American Women Lisa Charleyboy Canada, Mary Beth Leatherdale Canada
    9781554519576 Paperback YOUNG ADULT NONFICTION / People & Places Age (years) from 14, Grade (CAN) from 9, Grade (US) from 9 Publication Date:September 12, 2017
    $14.95 CAD 8.5 x 10.9 x 0.4 in | 440 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Annick Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Native Women demand to be heard in this stunning anthology.

      Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #Not Your Princess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

      Bio

      Lisa Charleyboy (Tsilhqot'in) is Editor-In-Chief of Urban Native Magazine, which focuses on pop culture with an Indigenous twist. She is also the host of CBC Radio's New Fire. She lives in Vancouver.



      Mary Beth Leatherdale writes, edits and consults on books, magazines, and digital resources for children and youth.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Amelia Bloomer Project List, ALA 2017, Nominated
      American Indians in Children’s Literature Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Best Books for Kids & Teens, *starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2018, Joint winner
      Books of the Year, Quill & Quire 2017, Joint winner
      Cooperative Children’s Book Center Choices List 2018, Joint winner
      Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults Award, YALSA 2017, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award 2018, Short-listed
      Foreword Indies Book of the Year Award, Bronze 2018, Joint winner
      Independent Publisher Book Award 2018, Joint winner
      Indigenous Literature Award, First Nation Communities READ 2018, Short-listed
      Kirkus Reviews Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Nautilus Award, Silver 2018, Joint winner
      Next Generation Indie Book Award 2019, Short-listed
      Norma Fleck Award 2018, Nominated
      Notable Books for a Global Society 2018, Joint winner
      Read Indigenous List, Toronto Public Library 2018, Joint winner
      Red Maple Award 2018, Nominated
      School Library Journal Best Books List 2017, Joint winner
      Skipping Stones Honor Award 2018, Joint winner
      Texas TAYSHAS Reading List 2018, Joint winner
      Top Ten Best Bet, Ontario Library Association 2018, Joint winner
      Reviews

      “A stunning anthology of creative writing and art . . . All YA collections will want this.”


      “A moving and powerful collection that draws strength from the variety of voices and lived experiences it represents.”


      “Fills an under-represented niche.”


      “Both testament to the complexity of Indigenous women’s identities and ferocious statement that these women fully inhabit the modern world.”


      “Highly Recommended . . . What you see and read in this book will linger in your head and heart.”


      “One of the collection’s biggest strengths is the sheer range of work . . . Every turn of the page is exciting, which is exactly what you need in a book like this.”


      “Beautiful, angry and insistent, this collection of the voices of Native women belongs on the shelves of every library serving teens.”


      “Bursts with inspiration, beauty and self-awareness.”


      “So right for the times.”


      “This book truly has the potential to change minds . . . Do what you need to do to get this book and put it into the hands of teen (and adult) readers.”


      “Provocative, thoughtful and sometimes humorous, this book showcases tenacious and talented indigenous women ready to take on the world.”


      “Librarians, teachers, parents: please put this book into girls’ and teens’ hands.”


      “The design is dramatic, authentic, and full of observation and wisdom. It provokes thought and causes readers to reflect and consider alternate ways of looking at diversity, history and identity. You should read it, and then share it!”


      “Will educate teens and give them perspective on a subject that is often ignored.”


      “Often edgy, and always provocative.”


      “A touching collection.”


      “Visceral and eye-opening . . . [a] small but mighty read.”

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    9781771663588 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies Publication Date:September 01, 2017
    $20.00 CAD 5.4 x 8 x 0.5 in | 220 gr | 260 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Book*hug Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      On her first book tour at the age of 26, Lee Maracle was asked a question from the audience, one she couldn’t possibly answer at that moment. But she has been thinking about it ever since. As time has passed, she has been asked countless similar questions, all of them too big to answer, but not too large to contemplate. These questions, which touch upon subjects such as citizenship, segregation, labour, law, predjudice and reconcilliation (to name a few), are the heart of My Conversations with Canadians.

      In prose essays that are both conversational and direct, Maracle seeks not to provide any answers to these questions she has lived with for so long. Rather, she thinks through each one using a multitude of experiences she’s had as a Canadian, a First Nations leader, a woman and
      mother and grandmother over the course of her life. Lee Maracle’s My Conversations with Canadians presents a tour de force exploration into the writer’s own history and a re-imagining of the future of our nation.
      Bio

      North Vanvouver-born Lee Maracle is the author of numerous critically acclaimed literary works, including Bobbi Lee: Indian Rebel, Ravensong, Celia's Song, Memory Serves, I Am Woman, Talking to the Diaspora. Her collection of essays, My Conversations with Canadians, was a finalist for the First Nation Communities READ 2018-19 Award, and the 2018 Toronto Book Awards. She is also the co-editor of a number of anthologies, including the award-winning My Home As I Remember. A member of the Sto:Loh Nation, Maracle is a recipient of the Order of Canada, the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal, the JT Stewart Award, the Ontario Premier's Award for Excellence in the Arts for 2014, and the 2018 Harbourfront Festival Prize; she has also been nominated for the 2019 Neustadt Prize. Maracle is currently an instructor in the Aboriginal Studies Program at the University of Toronto, where she teaches Oral Tradition. She is also the Traditional Teacher for First Nation's House and an instructor with the Centre for Indigenous Theatre. Maracle has served as Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Toronto, the University of Waterloo, and the University of Western Washington, and received an Honorary Doctor of Letters from St. Thomas University in 2009. Lee Maracle lives in Toronto.

      Marketing & Promotion
        Electronic ARCs available July 15, 2017

        Events in Toronto, Ottawa, Calgary, Winnipeg, Banff and Vancouver
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Toronto Book Awards 2018, Short-listed
      Reviews
      Praise+for Lee Maracle:

      “The topics she covers, the approaches she employs, and the strength of her language highlight the reasons the author has been a driving force in Canadian aboriginal culture for decades.” —Quill and Quire

      “[A]t this fertile moment for change in the relationship between Canada’s indigenous and nonindigenous peoples, Lee Maracle’s new collection of oratories… takes on even greater significance.” —The Georgia Straight

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    Marrow Thieves Cherie Dimaline Canada
    9781770864863 Paperback FICTION / General Age (years) from 13 - 25 Publication Date:May 10, 2017
    $14.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.5 in | 200 gr | 180 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Dancing Cat Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for 2018 CBC Canada Reads

      Winner of 2017 Governor General's Literary Award (Young People's Literature - Text)

      Winner of 2017 Kirkus Prize

      Nominated for 2018 Forest of Reading - White Pine Awards

      A Globe and Mail Best Book


      Shortlisted for the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children's Book Award

      Shortlisted for the Indigenous Literature Award

      Longlisted for the Sunburst Award


      Just when you think you have nothing left to lose, they come for your dreams.

      Humanity has nearly destroyed its world through global warming, but now an even greater evil lurks. The indigenous people of North America are being hunted and harvested for their bone marrow, which carries the key to recovering something the rest of the population has lost: the ability to dream. In this dark world, Frenchie and his companions struggle to survive as they make their way up north to the old lands. For now, survival means staying hidden - but what they don't know is that one of them holds the secret to defeating the marrow thieves.

      Bio
      Cherie Dimaline is a Métis author and editor whose award-winning fiction has been published and anthologized internationally. Her first book, Red Rooms, was published in 2007 and her novel The Girl Who Grew a Galaxy was released in 2013. In 2014, she was named the Emerging Artist of the Year at the Ontario Premier's Award for Excellence in the Arts, and became the first Aboriginal Writer in Residence for the Toronto Public Library. Her book A Gentle Habit was published in August 2016. The Marrow Thieves has won the Governor General’s Literary Award and the Kirkus Prize; it is a finalist for the White Pine Award, was named to the Globe and Mail Top 100 and was selected for CBC’s Canada Reads.
      Marketing & Promotion
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Kirkus Prize (Young Readers' Literature) 2017, Winner
      Governor General's Literary Award (Young People's Literature - Text) 2017, Winner
      Forest of Reading - White Pine Awards 2018, Nominated
      CBC Canada Reads 2018, Short-listed
      Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children's Book Award 2018, Short-listed
      Sunburst Award for Excellence in Canadian Literature of the Fantastic 2018, Winner
      Indigenous Literature Award 2018, Short-listed
      Amy Mathers Teen Book Award 2018, Winner
      CODE Burt Award for First Nations, Inuit and Métis Young Adult Literature 2018, Winner
      One Book, One Brampton 2018, Winner
      One Book, One London 2018, Winner
      OLA Best Bets 2017, Commended
      Reviews
      “Miigwans is a true hero; in him Dimaline creates a character of tremendous emotional depth and tenderness, connecting readers with the complexity and compassion of Indigenous people. A dystopian world that is all too real and that has much to say about our own.” Starred review
      There's a quality in Dimaline's writing that reached from the page, into my being ... That's a specific reference to the residential schools of the past, where so much was taken from Native children. It is one of many points in The Marrow Thieves where - painfully or with exquisite beauty - Dimaline's story resonates with me. It will resonate with other Native readers, too, especially those who are Anishinabe. Several tribal nations are mentioned in here, too ... There's so much more to say ... about Miggs and Isaac, about Ri, about Minerva, about French. But I'll stop and let you be with these achingly dear characters. I highly recommend The Marrow Thieves.
      "A timely and necessary read ... powerful and endlessly smart, it’s a crucial work of fiction for people of all ages." Starred review
      In The Marrow Thieves, Cherie Dimaline creates a near-future world which distinctly echoes our own, current and past traumas that have come back to repeat themselves, fiction with a basis in reality that gives the narrative a sheen of hard truths, following the trials and tribulations of a relatable cast of characters and their struggles to survive, and live their lives with the love and safety denied to them. The high-stakes tension of each scene pulls the reader along through the story, with a core message about our dreams and culture, which despite losses, has the potential to heal, and the power to restore.
      "[The Marrow Thieves] brilliantly connects the legacy of residential schools to a dystopian post-climate-change future where only Indigenous people are able to dream. Dimaline’s novel reminds us of the power of storytelling and the importance of community, reinforced for the disenfranchised children by the wisdom of the heroic elder, Miigwans. The writing is painful yet beautiful, bleak but ultimately hopeful. In this era of reconciliation, Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves is a work of speculative fiction that resonates and stays with the reader long past the last page."
      "The way that [Dimaline] built these characters and this community was really incredible. You felt their connections, you felt how much they loved each other and had really built this family on the road."
      "This book is classified as Young Adult fiction, but do not let that label deter you. While being accessible to younger readers, the book should be read by folks of all ages, in Canada and abroad. It is a sensational novel both thrilling in its writing and profound in its social commentary on colonialism, racism and the systematic oppression of Indigenous communities."

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