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  • 1
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    Tires and Wires The Story of Electric Trolley Coaches Serving 17 Canadian Cities Tom Schwartzkopf Canada
    9781927599488 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Public Transportation Publication Date:January 15, 2019
    $59.95 CAD 8 x 10.5 x 1 in | 920 gr | 272 pages Carton Quantity:12 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      During the 1880s, widespread availability of electricity was a modern wonder. It allowed fast electric transit vehicles to replace the traditional horse—drawn conveyances. Initially these streetcars (or trams) travelled on steel rails, but soon trolley coaches, with their rubber—tired buses began to dominate, because they proved more maneuverable streets increasingly crowded with automobile traffic.
      Every major city in Canada added fleets of the new electric coaches, which, thanks to their quiet powerful motors could climb hills and accelerate faster than their petrol—fuelled counterparts.
      St. Johns, Saint John, Halifax, Montreal, Ottawa, Cornwall, Toronto, Hamilton,, Kitchener, Windsor, Port Arthur—Fort William, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Calgary, Edmonton, Nelson, Vancouver, and Victoria are the focus for this history, which features more than 200 photographs and drawings, route maps, a history of the nine Canadian trolley coach manufacturers, and complete system rosters.

      Bio

      Tom Schwartzkopf is a teacher, writer (both of award—winning children's books and historical transport histories), professor, and playwright. He lives in Ottawa.

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  • 2
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    Canadian National Steam! <p>Canadian National Steam! is an updated and expanded text based on Clegg & Corley's Canadian Natio Donald R. McQueen Canada
    9781927599006 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:September 06, 2013
    $49.95 CAD 8 x 10.5 x 1.3 in | 880 gr | 248 pages Carton Quantity:15 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
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      Description

      A Locomotive History of the People's Railway
      An illustrated history of CN's more than 4300 steam locomotives. It is so detailed, so full of photographs and information, the premier volume will then be followed by seven rosters.
      Canadian National Steam! is an updated and expanded text based on Clegg & Corley's Canadian National Steam Power, outlining the history and technical development of steam power as influenced by the different CNR Motive Power Chiefs. Its 248 pages includes a summary of all locomotive classes with wheel types, road- and builder-numbers, a list of all predecessor and subsequent owners of CNR power, a builder's list of CNR steam power, a bibliography and an index. There are 147 photos of historic locomotives, most in operation, exhibiting their awesome power and evoking pleasant memories of nostalgic days gone by when trains took everybody everywhere. Spectacular cover illustrations are in full colour.
      The book contains 43 tables and an extensive series of appendices — 47 in all — covering across-the-classes items such as livery, sales, leases, appliance application, (including compounding, gearing, superheating, feedwater heating, smoke deflectors, stokers, oil burners, cab and tender designs). There's also a guide to the individual locomotive roster volumes.
      The subsequent roster volumes will be available later in 2013, and only on a "special order — no returns" basis. They will contain the individual locomotive rosters by CNR classes according to similar or related wheel arrangements (including Newfoundland Railway and the Central Vermont Railway). Every steam locomotive will be listed, and the roster will provide all the information historians, rail enthusiasts and transportation buffs would ever want to know (and then some), including build data, ownership history, appliance history, class notes.
      More than 1200 photographs, with informative captions, will appear in the roster volumes, which will feature sturdy wire binding, permitting the roster book pages to open completely flat. Many readers will welcome the opportunity to own this historic series. The original Canadian National Steam Power, published in 1969, has been out of print for almost forty years after selling thousands of copies. Since then, CN has become "North America's Railroad", and is widely recognized as the most efficient, best-run railway of all on the continent, and perhaps in the world. This new series will be a valuable entry in every CNR enthusiast's library, and is sure to become a rare collector's item.

      Bio

      Don McQueen, born in Toronto in 1938, was raised in Brockville, Ontario and received an Honours Arts degree in History from Queen's University in 1963. Moving to London, Ontario later that same year, he began a secondary school teaching career which spanned 33 years in six of the city's schools. Initially a school librarian, teaching Canadian history and geography, Don also taught and developed school curricula in the humanities, world civilizations, law, sociology, world issues, and photography. His articles, background research or contributions have appeared in a number of Canadian books and publications, including Branchline, CN LINES (Canadian National Railways Historical Association) and Canadian Rail.

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  • 3
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    Transit Progress Derailed Ontario Hydro's Radial Electric Railway Scheme David Spencer Canada
    9781897190777 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Public Transportation Publication Date:May 27, 2013
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.62 in | 449 gr | 268 pages Carton Quantity:25 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
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      Description
      In the early 1900s, privately-generated electricity was the booming technology, and with it, profitable electric railways. Prosperous London, Ontario manufacturer (also Mayor and Conservative MLA), Adam Beck nevertheless believed in the benefits of a publicly-owned electricity grid and argued government-ownership could spread electric technology well beyond the use of a privileged elite and could cost people less.Beck?s political acumen resulted in the 1906 creation of Ontario Hydro ? the world?s first publicly-owned utility. Two years after public power first flowed through the wires to Berlin, Ontario, he mused aloud that what was really needed was to link the province?s many municipalities through a series of electrically-powered railways to two core areas: Hamilton serving the western end of Lake Ontario and the burgeoning hub of Toronto. It never happened. An antagonistic Premier Ernest Drury deflected the issue to a Royal Commission, whose avowedly anti-radial chairman delivered a damning conclusion: the popularity of automobiles meant Beck?s project was not financially feasible. David Spencer?s study of power politics and skulduggery shows how dark provincial politics could be in the first two decades of the twentieth century. Perhaps current events demonstrate that hasn?t changed?
      Bio
      David Spencer is a professor of information and media studies at the University of Western Ontario. He holds a diploma in media from Ryerson, a B.A. from York, and a Ph.D. from U of T. His work has been published in Canada, the US, and Europe. He has worked in history circles acting at one time as President of the American Journalism Historians? Association and chair of the History Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. He is a corresponding editor for the American publication, Journalism History. He is also the founder and editor of the Canadian Journal of Media Studies.
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  • 4
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    9781897190098 Paperback HISTORY / General Publication Date:March 15, 2006
    $34.95 CAD 8 x 10.5 x 0.29 in | 1.21 lb | 128 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
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      Description

      In the 19th century, steam-hauled trains had a virtual monopoly on transportation of passengers. After the 1914-1918 Great War, competition from highway vehicles, which had previously not troubled North American railroads to any considerable extent, began to provoke renewed interest in a more economical form of railway motive power, and a number of 'rail buses' of varying designs were introduced. Self Propelled Cars of the CNR details how, in November 1925, CNR's new diesel-electric car No. 15820 completed its record-breaking run across the North American continent, from Montreal to Vancouver. The train established a new world record for endurance, economy, and sustained speed over such a distance. The book explains how this comparatively small self propelled vehicle led to their wide-spread usage across the system, and indeed across many of CN's rival systems, including the Canadian Pacific Railway. The book describes how, despite the growing popularity of automobiles, and increasing availability of better roads, these new rail cars were successful in stemming the decline in rail passenger patronage, particularly on low-traffic branch lines.

      Bio

      Anthony Clegg was born in Toronto and resided in St. Hilaire in the Montreal area. He began his career with Canadian National Railways in 1942, as a draftsman and cartographer. He was an associate of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association and was for several years Editor of Canadian Rail magazine. Anthony Clegg's writing include Mount Royal Tunnel, and (with Raymond Corley) Canadian National Steam Power. He collaborated with Omer Lavallee to write Catenary Through the Counties, as well as Cornwall Electric: the Insurance Company's Streetcars.

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  • 5
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    Mount Royal Tunnel Canada's First Subway Anthony Clegg Canada
    9781897190418 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:September 30, 2008
    $29.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.23 in | 354 gr | 100 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
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      Description

      An illustrated history of the electrified railway tunnel and station complex still serving Montreal.

      This story had its start in the pre-World War I railway building boom, when Canadian Northern Railway set out to provide Canadians with competition to the Canadian Pacific and Grand Trunk railways. Since those competitors had already established entries into Montreal from the east, west, and south, CNoR decided that entering downtown from the north, even though a four-mile tunnel through Mount Royal would be required.

      The Mount Royal Tunnel describes the building of CNoR’s huge complex that became today’s Central Station, and the site for downtown Montreal’s massive complex: Place Ville Marie, Queen Elizabeth Hotel, Place Bonaventure, CN headquarters, and other large office buildings. The clean-running electric locomotives hauled trainloads of commuters to the CNoR’s 'Model City' development and other suburbs to Montreal’s northwest, with change-overs made to steam locomotives (later diesels) to take inter-city trains to Ottawa, Toronto, and the western provinces.

      Anthony Clegg’s book describes, in detail, how the tunnel was constructed and equipped for electrical powering of trains … what the trains that ran were like, and where they went … how the post-World War I period caused government takeover of CNoR, becoming Canadian National Railways … insights on how the increasing traffic led to new multiple-unit self-propelled commuter trains … the decline in inter-city traffic, and how that led to the line being completely reconstituted as a commuter line … with CNR finally exiting the commuter operations entirely, turning them over to the municipal AMT, who completely reengineered and modernized the line’s electrification, infrastructure, and power substation facilities.

      Over 120 photos illustrate the construction of the tunnel, the line, and the Central Station complex. Locomotives and passenger cars, including various multiple-unit cars and trailers, as well as line cars, are featured. Maps and selected equipment diagrams are included.

      Bio

      Anthony Clegg was born in Toronto and currently resides in St. Hilaire in the Montreal area. He began his career with Canadian National Railways in 1942, as a draftsman and cartographer.

      He is an associate of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association and was for several years Editor of Canadian Rail magazine.

      Anthony Clegg's writing include Mount Royal Tunnel, and -- with Raymond Corley -- Canadian National Steam Power. He collaborated with Omer Lavallee to write Catenary Through the Counties, as well as Cornwall Electric -- the Insurance Company's Streetcars.

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  • 6
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    Ontario's Grand River Valley Electric Railways streetcars, trolley coaches, and interurban railways John Mills Canada, Ted Wickson Canada
    9781897190524 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:November 07, 2010
    $54.95 CAD 8.5 x 10.5 x 0.5 in | 739 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:12 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      This book concentrates on the electric lines of the part of Southern Ontario adjacent to the Grand River (plus a corporate outpost at Woodstock). Naturally fertile and prosperous, this area attracted early settlement which coalesced around two points: the head of river navigation at Brantford, and the waterpower sites at and north of Galt. The latter gave rise to a densely-settled triangle bounded by Galt (which later, with Preston and Hespeler, was incorporated into today?s City of Cambridge), Waterloo and Guelph, with outliers to the north at the Elmira and Fergus areas. Such conditions were ideal for the development of local railway transportation which appeared as expected: horsecar lines were built at an early date in Brantford and Berlin/Waterloo, and the Galt Preston & Hespeler was one of the first electric interurban lines in Canada. The vitality of the lines, particularly those in the northerly triangle, was thus established, and it continued for many years. The transformation of the GP&H into the Grand River Railway in the early 1920s was the most complete reconstruction in Canadian electric railway transit history. The book tells the story of the area's streetcars, trolley coaches and interurban railways that provided both local and inter-city passenger, freight and express delivery services to communities such as Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hespeler, Galt, Preston, Brantford, Woodstock, Ingersoll, Port Dover and many more. It explains how the individual railways began, the politics and economics that impacted their development, their rise and eventual decline. Profusely-illustrated with many rare photos, the book features over 200 images, about 50 of them in superb colour. About a dozen maps provide details on where the lines ran, and an equipment list delivers details on the various companies? rolling stock.
      Bio
      John Mills was born in Toronto in 1931, and has lived there all his life. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1952. Shortly thereafter, John entered the business world, but found that a commercial career was not for him, and soon returned to the University of Toronto as an administrative staff member. Being a compulsive researcher, he found this to be an ideal workplace environment, as it provided him with unrestricted access to the university's enormous collection of information, books and artifacts. The author is a founding member of the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Association, and is an honourary life member. The OERHA operates the Halton County Radial Railway, featuring historic electric transit vehicles in action at their museum in Milton, Ontario. John has written several books on electric railway subjects, including Niagara, St. Catharines & Toronto Railway, and Cataract Traction. Several others are in preparation. Besides being interested in railways, John is equally fascinated by steamboats, and is the author of The New Mills List. This is a listing, with statistics and other details, of over 6000 Canadian coastal and inland steamers from the beginning, covering the period from 1809 up to 1930. The definitive edition was published in 1999. In addition to his transportation hobby, John's great joy in life is travelling the world. He hopes you will enjoy your own travels back to a bygone era, through the fascinating transportation systems that comprised Ontario?s Grand River Valley Electric Railways.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Independent Book Publisher Awards 2011, Winner
      Reviews
  • 7
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    Niagara St. Catharines & Toronto Railway Electric Transit in Canada's Niagara Peninsula John Mills Canada
    9781897190272 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:March 01, 2008
    $44.95 CAD 8 x 10 x 0.59 in | 848 gr | 257 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      From its inception as a horsecar line in 1874, the Niagara, St. Catharines, & Toronto Railway is one of the foremost examples in Canada of an intensively developed and closely integrated transportation system. It operated local street railways, interurban lines, carload and less-than-carload freight, lake steamers, a large motor coach system, and even a circle trolley line around the Niagara Gorge. The NS&T and predecessors include the first electric railway in Canada to have operated without interruption, and the last interurban passenger service. Each aspect of the companyís operations was coordinated with others to form a transportation system which, while comparatively small in area, was very active in operation, and several distinct types of passenger service (local, commuter, inter-city and excursion) were developed. Author John Mills tells the story of all of them, with details on where the routes ran, maps of the line, stations, and connections with the many major railways that served the Niagara Peninsula. There are 256 pages of text, containing nine detailed system maps, a roster of the railwayís rolling stock, and over 300 fascinating photographs, fifty in full colour.

      Bio

      John Mills was born in Toronto in 1931, and has lived there all his life. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1952. Shortly thereafter, John entered the business world, but found that a commercial career was not for him, and soon returned to the University of Toronto as an administrative staff member. Being a compulsive researcher, he found this to be an ideal workplace environment, as it provided him with unrestricted access to the university's enormous collection of information, books, and artifacts.
      The author is a founding member of the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Association, and is an honourary life member. The OERHA operates the Halton County Radial Railway, featuring historic electric transit vehicles in action at their museum in Milton, Ontario.

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  • 8
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    Railways of Southern Quebec Vol. II Derek Booth Canada
    9781897190319 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:September 30, 2008
    $29.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.45 in | 408 gr | 196 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Railways of Southern Quebec, Volume II, continues the study, begun in Volume I, of various railway companies that operated in Quebec south of the St. Lawrence River. The featured railways illustrate the many diverse elements of 19th century railway construction. Also covered are aspects of the railway network rationalization resulting from railways having lost their transportation primacy to cars and trucks.

      Volume I dealt with the earliest railways in southern Quebec, including the St. Lawrence & Atlantic (later Canadian National’s Grand Trunk New England line to Portland), as well as railways lying west of the Richelieu River in southern Quebec.

      Volume II focuses on the central Eastern Townships with the histories of the Waterloo & Magog Railway, the Missisquoi & Black Rivers Valley Railway, and the Orford Mountain Railway. Also covered are other associated lines, including the Canadian Pacific Railway’s “Short Line” which continued from Megantic, Quebec to Saint John, New Brunswick through Maine. There are overviews of several other railway companies, all of which, together, formed the extensive network of railways that lay south of the St. Lawrence River in Quebec.

      Volume III examined the history of the Quebec Central Railway. Operating in the eastern and northern margins of the Eastern Townships, the QCR – primarily a resource railway – emerged as the largest regional carrier in Quebec by the beginning of the twentieth century.

      Bio

      A retired Professor of Geography at Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Derek Booth is a historical geographer with a special interest in the roles that railways played in the creation of human and economic landscapes in Canada. A graduate of McGill University, he is a Quebecer with deep family roots in the Eastern Townships and in the Ottawa Valley. In addition to Railways of Southern Quebec, Volumes I, II, & III he has written and lectured extensively on transport issues in the Eastern Townships. His current research interests focus on elements of the region’s cultural, military, and economic geography. Derek lives with his wife, Sandy, in Sherbrooke, Quebec.

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  • 9
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    Calgary's Electric Transit A Century of Transportation Service in Canada?s Stampede City <p>Calgary's Electric Transit is the story of electric street railway, trolleybus and light rail veh Colin Hatcher Canada, Tom Schwarzkopf Canada
    9781897190555 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Public Transportation Publication Date:May 27, 2013
    $39.95 CAD 9 x 12 x 0.85 in | 580 gr | 250 pages Carton Quantity:29 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
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      Description
      Calgary?s Electric Transit is the story of electric street railway, trolleybus and light rail vehicle transit in Canada?s western city of Calgary, Alberta.Calgary was founded in 1875, when the North West Mounted Police established a new fort ? Fort Calgary. A big boost for Calgary came eight years later, when the Canadian Pacific Railway ? building westward to the Pacific ? reached the Bow River in 1883. Calgary became an important centre for Canadian Pacific operations and has since become the railway?s headquarters location. By 1909, Calgary boasted a population of 30, 000 people. In July of that year the Calgary Electric Railway began operations with two cars, sixteen employees and three miles of track. The system quickly grew and the following year became known as the Calgary Municipal Railway. Through its forty years of street railway service, Calgary acquired passenger cars from such well-known Canadian builders as Ottawa Car Manufacturing Company, Preston Car & Coach Company and the Canadian Car & Foundry. In addition, the system?s roster included used cars from several sources in the United States. Totalling 113 cars in all ? plus a scenic car ? it has been a daunting task to secure photos for this book. Many superb images have been discovered, illustrating the operation of streetcars in different sections of the city. There are over 150 streetcar photos. Finding trolleybus photographs has been a challenge as well, but the authors have succeeded in gathering a fine selection representing all classes of 'trackless trolley' coaches purchased new and acquired used from other US systems. You?ll see streetcars and trolleybuses operating in the city centre, in the rural suburbs, and in residential neighbourhoods. Coverage of today?s modern rail transit cars is outstanding. Now called 'light rail vehicles', all classes of these LRVs are represented, operating in all seasons, and over most portions of the system, illustrating the many varied and unique Calgary urban environments. Rich, carefully composed black and white photos are rounded out with a fine showing of subjects in colour. There?s a variety of photos to interest everyone with an interest in the development of Calgary as a city: the construction of 'The Bay', early scenes in Bowness Park, and some views of the streetcars serving seemingly unpopulated fields that today are thriving subdivisions. Whether you?re a railway enthusiast or simply interested in Calgary?s history, you?ll find Colin Hatcher and Tom Schwarzkopf?s 200-page account of Calgary?s Electric Transit a fascinating, informative and enjoyable reading experience.
      Bio
      Colin Hatcher spent the early years of his life in Montreal. Streetcars and commuter trains were the principal means of local transportation. His family moved to Sudbury, Ontario while the streetcars were still operating and there were lots of trains nearby. Colin returned to Montreal to attend Sir George Williams University (now Concordia University) where, as well as attaining his Batchelor of Arts degree, he became interested in the activities of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association. When he moved to Regina to take up a position with the Regina YMCA, his CRHA friends encouraged and supported him in a quest to research the Regina streetcar system, resulting in the book Saskatchewan?s Pioneer Streetcars -- the Story of the Regina Municipal Railway (Railfare: 1971).Calgary Transit expressed an interest in a similar publication as their contribution to the City of Calgary?s 75th Anniversary celebration, resulting in the 1975 release of Stampede City Streetcars -- the Story of the Calgary Municipal Railway (Railfare). Following a move further north, Colin tackled the Edmonton streetcar story, meeting up with Tom Schwarzkopf who had an interest in trolley coaches. Railfare published their joint work Edmonton?s Electric Transit in 1983. Colin continues to be actively involved in railway preservation and operation efforts, first with Alberta Pioneer Railway Association, now with Edmonton Radial Railway Society, as a volunteer archivist and one of fifty volunteer motormen operating streetcars on both the High Level Bridge and Fort Edmonton Park Divisions. Colin helped Geoff Lester, a retired cartographer at the University of Alberta, prepare an on-line Atlas of Alberta Railways. He has written two volumes on the Northern Alberta Railways (BRMNA, Calgary), a booklet on the first 25 years of the LRT system in Edmonton for Edmonton Transit, and the story of the first 100 years of the YMCA in Edmonton. He writes regularly for the Trip Sheet, a historical journal of the Edmonton Radial Railway Society and occasionally for Canadian Rail of the Canadian Railroad Historical Society.
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  • 10
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    Built for War Canada's Intercolonial Railway <p>Anyone who has had occasion to travel on VIA Rail's oldest trans-continental train 'The Ocean' b Jay Underwood Canada
    9781897190005 Paperback TRANSPORTATION / Railroads Publication Date:October 15, 2005
    $39.95 CAD 9 x 6 x 0.75 in | 549 gr | 256 pages Carton Quantity:15 Canadian Rights: Y DC Books
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Anyone who has had occasion to travel on VIA Rail's oldest trans-continental train 'The Ocean' between Halifax and Montreal might wonder why the original route of the Intercolonial Railway took such a round-about course through northern New Brunswick.
      The answer lies in the fear nineteenth century Canadian and British politicians had that the Americans might attempt to seize control of British North America in a winter attack. With the St. Lawrence river frozen solid, reinforcements from Britain could not reach the fortress at Quebec. Hence, the building of the defensive rail line, following "Major Robinson's Path," a much overlooked facet of the railway's history.
      Built for War: Canada's Intercolonial Railway tells the story of Canada's first attempt to assert its sovereignty, and how the railway, built with military and economic objectives in mind, served its purpose so well.

      Bio
      Jay Underwood is a graduate of the journalism program of Holland College of Applied Arts and Technology in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Jay began his career in newspapers as a nightshift proof reader and obituary writer with the Charlottetown Guardian-Patriot. He then moved to the New Glasgow, Nova Scotia Evening News, as a reporter-photographer, and to the Truro, Nova Scotia Daily News as city editor. Briefly serving as city editor at the Timmins, Ontario Daily Press, he returned to Nova Scotia as editor and publisher of the Springhill-Parrsboro Record, and the Enfield Weekly Press, before joining the staff of the Halifax Daily News as senior copy editor and a member of the editorial board.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      “Built for War is Underwood’s third work of railway history and his largest to date.” — The Weekly Press, Oct. 2005 “Conventional history suggests that the railway was something ‘given’ to the Maritime provinces as a condition of Confederation to improve the region’s economy. Instead, Underwood argues that the railway was a military necessity for defending central Canada from any invasion by the United States during the winter months.” — The Charlottetown Guardian, Nov. 2005

      Built for War is Underwoods third work of railway history and his largest to date. The Weekly Press, Oct. 2005 Conventional history suggests that the railway was something given to the Maritime provinces as a condition of Confederation to improve the regions economy. Instead, Underwood argues that the railway was a military necessity for defending central Canada from any invasion by the United States during the winter months. The Charlottetown Guardian, Nov. 2005

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