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Arsenal Pulp Winter2020

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  • 1
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    Bronx Heroes in Trumpland Ray Felix, Tom Sciacca
    9781551528052 Paperback COMICS & GRAPHIC NOVELS / General Publication Date:February 24, 2020
    $14.95 CAD 7.5 x 10 x 0.45 in | 345 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The Bronx Heroes take on their biggest foe of all, President Donald Trump, in this hilarious and boldly subversive comic book.

      Astron Star Soldier is an astronaut/alien warrior who first appeared in Tom Sciacca's Astral Comics #1 in 1977. Black Power is an African American superhero, war veteran, and former boxer who first appeared in Ray Felix's comic A World Without Superheroes in 1993. As the Bronx Heroes dedicated to fighting criminals and eradicating injustice, they join forces to confront their greatest foe ever - an evil supervillain named Donald Trump.

      Trump is a toupee-wearing scoundrel plotting to use mind control to vanquish America after first conquering the five boroughs of New York. With his help of the evil prince Putin and his MAGA hat-wearing goon named Gorka, Trump is determined to build walls, create divisiveness, and destroy the media. Astron Star Soldier and Black Power resolve to defeat Trump and restore order but are hypnotized into helplessness by Trump's scheming FLOTUS. Can the Bronx Heroes succeed where Mueller, Hilary Clinton, and the US congress failed, and save the nation from itself?

      Outlandish and recklessly funny, Bronx Heroes in Trumpland is a comic book that will make you believe in America again.

      Bio
      Ray Felix is a Bronx native born in 1973. His comics include Bronx Heroes 1.0: Runaway Slave, Bronx Heroes 2.0: The Greatest Hero Black Power, Heavy Traffic, Enter: The Roach and A World Without Superheroes. Felix is also the founder of the community-based organization Bronx Heroes Comic Con and co-founder of Women in Comics Con, both of which promote literacy and education through the practice of reading and creating comics. He has been the recipient of numerous awards and grants including from New York State Council on the Arts in 2011 -2016, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Bloomberg Philanthropies; he was also awarded a Citation of Merit from the Borough of The Bronx for his community based work and teaching at-risk LGBTQ youth.

      Tom Sciacca is a Bronx-born artist/writer/journalist/filmmaker. In high school, he met future Marvel superstar George Perez, and the two bonded over their mutual love of comics. The duo started working on various fanzines in the 1970s, finally breaking into Marvel Comics in 1974, where Tom worked as assistant to Stan Lee. He was later assistant to Vince Colletta, art director at DC Comics, where he worked on projects such as the 1978 film Superman and the comic book Superman vs Muhammad Ali. Sciacca was also one of the first indie comic publishers, of Astral Comics in the 1970s and early 1980s; he recently revived Astral Comics with Ray Felix as art director.
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  • 2
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    The Home Stretch A Father, a Son, and All the Things They Never Talk About George K. Ilsley Canada
    9781551527956 Paperback FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS / Eldercare Publication Date:May 01, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.65 in | 300 gr | 230 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A moving, honest memoir about a man who returns to his rural hometown to take care of his cranky elderly father.

      George K. Ilsley explores his complex relationship with his aging father in this candid memoir full of sharp emotion and disarming humor. George's father is ninety-one years old, a widower, and fiercely independent; an avid gardener, he's sweet and more than a little eccentric. But he's also a hoarder who makes embarrassing comments and invitations to women, and he has made no plans whatsoever for what is inevitably coming over the horizon.

      Decades after George has moved four time zones away, he begins to make regular trips home to help care for his cranky and uncooperative father, and to sift through the hoarded fragments of his father's life. In doing so, George is forced to confront some uncomfortable family secrets and ugly personal truths, only to discover that the inexorable power of life's journey pulls everyone along in its wake.

      The Home Stretch is a beguiling, moving book about aging parents who do not "go gently," and their adult children who must reckon with their own past before helping to guide them on their way.


      Bio

      George K. Ilsley is the author of the memoir The Home Stretch: A Father, a Son, and All the Things They Never Talk About, the story collection Random Acts of Hatred, and the novel ManBug. His stories have also appeared in numerous anthologies and magazines. Selected as a writer in residence at Berton House Writers Retreat in Dawson City, George has won the Lush Triumphant Literary Award for creative non-fiction and for fiction. Originally from Nova Scotia, he now lives in Vancouver.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Absolutely gorgeous. Reading The Home Stretch I laughed and cried, and, like all the best journeys, as I neared home, I laughed and cried at the same time. In fact, the tears are still fresh on my skin, and something as wide open as laughter remains in my chest. I know the father of this story. And the son. It's my father. It's me. George K. Ilsley is a writer of profound grace and equanimity. -Matt Rader, author of Visual Inspection, Desecrations, and What I Want to Tell Goes Like This
      The Home Stretch is a wonderful book -- witty, tender, and lucidly written -- about the caregiving of sons and the complicated inheritances of fathers. It is about finding through the challenges of elder care the parent you've never really known. Lifegiving and bracingly honest, George K. Ilsley's writing is a welcomed punch to the heart. -David Chariandy, author of Brother
  • 3
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    The Rat People A Journey through Beijing's Forbidden Underground Patrick Saint-Paul, David Homel Canada
    9781551528038 Paperback HISTORY / Social History Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.6 in | 425 gr | 195 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A shocking exploration of Beijing's notorious underground where over 1 million residents live: a sobering reminder of the human cost of capitalism.

      In a relatively short amount of time, China has become the second largest economy in the world and is soon poised to overtake the US. In 1978, when China introduced its economic reforms, its GDP was $214 billion USD; in 2019, it is estimated to increase to $14 trillion USD. But the country's rapid growth was achieved on the backs and shoulders of its workforce, many of whom were peasant farmers turned into the mingong, urban migrant workers, celebrated by Mao and credited with helping China achieve its economic miracle. Now, a million of them and their descendants live underground in Beijing under inhuman conditions, where there is no light or water and little sanitation.

      Author Patrick Saint-Paul spent two years living among the "rat people" (shizu) of Beijing, in a network of deep tunnels and 20,000 former bomb shelters built during the Cold War. The mingong come to Beijing from all parts of the country, in search of jobs and a better life, but they are unable to afford their own homes on their meager salaries. For them, China's dream of prosperity for all is a bitter fallacy.

      In The Rat People, Saint-Paul brings the individual stories of the shizu to life, creating a shocking cautionary tale about the lengths to which people will go in search of a better life, and the human cost paid in service to the modern economy.


      Bio

      Patrick Saint-Paul has been a correspondent in China for the French newspaper Le Figaro since 2013. Over his career he has also covered assignments in Sierra Leone (which won him the Jean Marin Prize for War Correspondents in 2000), Liberia, Sudan, Cote d'Ivoire, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Germany, as well as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Rat People is his first book.

      David Homel is a writer, journalist, filmmaker, and translator, and the author of seven novels. He has translated many French-language books into English and is a two-time recipient of the Governor General's Literary Award for Translation. He lives in Montreal.


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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      Dogged, passionate investigative journalism, fueled by outrage and empathy for the millions who dwell beneath the streets of Beijing, The Rat People literally casts light onto a vast dark space in twenty-first century urban Chinese experience. Patrick Saint-Paul gives voice to those otherwise silenced, and dignity to distressed lives. -Charles Foran, author of Sketches in Winter: A Beijing Postscript
      An astonishing expose of China's literal underbelly. Who knew Beijing's glittering towers lie above an Orwellian Airbnb, tomb-like catacombs home to millions of migrant workers and despairing university graduates? Even as China becomes the world's largest economy, popular unrest looms. Investigative journalism in the tradition of Upton Sinclair's The Jungle. -Jan Wong, author of Red China Blues
  • 4
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    You Suck, Sir Chronicles of a High School English Teacher and the Smartass Students Who Schooled Him Paul Bae Canada
    9781551528076 Paperback HUMOR / Form Publication Date:April 01, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.7 in | 320 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The latest Robin's Egg book: hilarious and touching conversations between a teacher and his students.

      What happens when a stand-up comedian teaches English in Vancouver's largest public school?

      During his student-teaching practicum, Paul Bae assigned weekend homework to an English class.

      A student muttered, "You suck."

      Mr. Bae turned on his heel, approached the student, and sternly asked, "What did you say?"

      The student replied, "Sorry. You suck, sir."

      Mr. Bae promptly returned to his desk, took out his teaching journal, and wrote down the exchange. That would become the first entry of hundreds of encounters with students.

      Over twelve years of teaching English, Paul Bae - known simply as "Sir" or "Mr. Bae" - kept several journals in which he recorded conversations he had with his students. You Suck, Sir presents the best of those conversations. Ranging from outrageously funny to touchingly poignant, these vignettes are full of heart. Paul's stories are an irreverent, honest glimpse of teaching and learning and an inspiring peek into the connection one teacher has with his students. Both educators and anyone who has ever been a student will see themselves and their daily triumphs and struggles reflected here.

      You Suck, Sir is the latest title to be published under the Robin's Egg Books imprint. Robin's Egg Books features some of the freshest, smartest, and above all, funniest writing on a variety of culturally relevant subjects. Titles in the imprint are curated and edited by comedian, playwright, and author Charles Demers.
      Bio
      Paul Bae is a comedian, writer, actor, and podcaster. He is the award-winning co-creator and co-writer of the podcast The Black Tapes and the author and producer of the critically acclaimed podcast The Big Loop. He lives in Lions Bay, BC.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      If you're a teacher, or a student, or had a teacher, you will enjoy this book very much. So that's pretty much everyone. Paul has a great handle on the ins and outs of being a teacher, and his humorous take on the profession is a fun read for everyone. -Gerry Dee, creator and star of Mr. D


      I feel a bit ahead of the curve here, because I was a fan of the You Suck, Sir stories long before they became a book, and a fan of Paul Bae as a comedian long before learning he was the one writing them. I probably should have put it together sooner, because it makes perfect sense -- they're both tremendously entertaining, always insightful, and funny as hell. Maybe I'm a little slow. -Brent Butt, creator and star of Corner Gas


      Charm is abundantly on offer in this book, as are closely observed moments of student life. -Vancouver Sun


      Jokes aside, what raises You Suck, Sir above the mass-market humour genre are its countless insights into teaching and mentoring: Bae's teachable moments include how both teachers and students can deal with bullying, misogyny, peer pressure, problems at home, and that traumatic first nasty YouTube comment. Rather than feeling cheesy or sentimental, these moments paint Bae as an honest and open teacher who's built a trusted rapport with his students and can serve as models for teachers everywhere. -Shrapnel Magazine

  • 5
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    Vanishing Monuments John Elizabeth Stintzi Canada
    9781551528014 Paperback FICTION / LGBT Publication Date:March 15, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.95 in | 425 gr | 304 pages Carton Quantity:24 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A brilliant novel whose lead character returns home to their long-estranged mother who is now suffering from dementia.

      Alani Baum, a non-binary photographer and teacher, hasn't seen their mother since they ran away with their girlfriend when they were seventeen - almost thirty years ago. But when Alani gets a call from a doctor at the assisted living facility where their mother has been for the last five years, they learn that their mother's dementia has worsened and appears to have taken away her ability to speak. As a result, Alani suddenly find themselves running away again - only this time, they're running back to their mother.

      Staying at their mother's empty home, Alani attempts to tie up the loose ends of their mother's life while grappling with the painful memories that - in the face of their mother's disease - they're terrified to lose. Meanwhile, the memories inhabiting the house slowly grow animate, and the longer Alani is there, the longer they're forced to confront the fact that any closure they hope to get from this homecoming will have to be manufactured.

      This beautiful, tenderly written debut novel by Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers winner John Elizabeth Stintzi explores what haunts us most, bearing witness to grief over not only what is lost, but also what remains.


      Bio
      John Elizabeth Stintzi is a non-binary writer who grew up on a cattle farm in northwestern Ontario. They are the 2019 recipient of the RBC Bronwen Wallace Award, and their work has appeared in The Malahat Review, Kenyon Review Online, Ploughshares, and in their poetry collection Junebat (House of Anansi). Their debut novel Vanishing Monuments (Arsenal Pulp Press) was published in 2020. They have an MFA in Creative Writing from Stony Brook University in Southampton, NY and currently teach critical and creative writing at the Kansas City Art Institute.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      The real pleasure of reading John Elizabeth Stintzi's book is to see a sensitive mind work through an internal landscape, and to watch them do it with such patience and generosity. -Sara Majka, author of Cities I've Never Lived In
      Vanishing Monuments is a remarkable novel, a beautiful puzzle of place and belonging, identity and vocation, duty and love. John Elizabeth Stintzi's writing is full of welcome and true surprise - I found myself underlining passages on every page, and then going back to underline more. -John K. Samson, musician and poet
      A camera "takes time and holds it still," says the narrator's mother, and reading Vanishing Monuments is like sifting through a darkroom and watching scenes emerge and accrue into an assemblage of life. Memory haunts this novel, at once elusive and inescapable. Like the narrative itself, it loops, layers, seizes, erodes. And John Elizabeth Stintzi conjures it all with a gorgeously queer, off-kilter grace. -Chelsey Johnson, author of Stray City
      Vanishing Monuments is a beautiful portrait of disassociation at once between countries, family, gender, identities, and, most importantly, "the distance between ... you and yourself." Stintzi braids the Metamorphoses together with the expansiveness of Winnipeg, those rolling prairies, all wondrously and ravenously superimposed together to form a work that is wet with memory. With a keen eye for image and an attuned ear for the whistling screams of Manitoba, we move slowly but steadily through the memory palace that is a childhood home abandoned - here, memory serves to animate said house with a beckoning siren call that asks us to conceptualize the art of staying affectively with a mother whittling away from dementia and a narrator storytelling from a double exposed aperture. An absolute monumental achievement of a first novel. -Joshua Whitehead, author of Jonny Appleseed
      Vanishing Monuments is a luminously written novel from an exciting writer, a welcome story of a midlife queer that many of us crave. -Literary Hub
      A surreal, poetic meditation on the struggle to feel at home with the past, family, and one's own body. -Kirkus Reviews
      An enchanting story with a truly compelling protagonist, Stintzi has marked themself as a writer to watch. -Seattle Times

      Stintzi deploys an impressive erudition in developing their debut novel ... elegantly constructed ... Highly recommended. -Vancouver Sun


      Vanishing Monuments presents a compelling and suspended kind of portrait, a space in which multiplicity of truth can coexist, can even contradict, and still be, at its core, the truth. -The New Territory


      A melancholic and complicated story about grief, memory and identity, the novel is a beautiful and compulsive read. -Xtra
  • 6
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    We Had No Rules Corinne Manning
    9781551527994 Paperback FICTION / LGBT Publication Date:March 15, 2020
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.45 in | 225 gr | 192 pages Carton Quantity:42 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A defiant, beautifully realized story collection about the messy complications of contemporary queer life.

      A young teenager stays a step ahead of her parents' sexuality-based restrictions by running away and learns a very different set of rules. A woman grieves the loss of a sister, a "gay divorce," and the pain of unacknowledged abuse with the help of a lone wallaby on a farm in Washington State. A professor of women's and gender studies revels in academic and sexual power but risks losing custody of the family dog.

      In Corinne Manning's stunning debut story collection, a cast of queer characters explore the choice of assimilation over rebellion. In this historical moment that's hyperaware of and desperate to define even the slowest of continental shifts, when commitment succumbs to the logic of capitalism and nobody knows what to call each other or themselves - Gay? Lesbian? Queer? Partners? Dad? - who are we? And if we don't know who we are, what exactly can we offer each other?

      Spanning the years 1992 to 2019, and moving from New York to North Carolina to Seattle, the eleven first-person stories in We Had No Rules feature characters who feel the promise of a radically reimagined world but choose complicity instead.


      Bio
      Corinne Manning is a prose writer and literary organizer. Their stories and essays have been published widely, including in Toward an Ethics of Activism and Shadow Map: An Anthology of Survivors of Sexual Assault. Corinne founded The James Franco Review, a project that sought to address implicit bias in the publishing industry. We Had No Rules is their first book.
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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      With elegant precision and understated glee, We Had No Rules opens up the ache between heartbreak and self-actualization -- between theory and practice, intimacy and belonging, community and loss. By confronting the regimentation in queer lives and loves, Manning explores the push and pull of intergenerational yearning in surprising ways. Tidy in structure yet emotionally unresolved, We Had No Rules rejects false closure, daring us to come up with our own answers. -Mattilda Bernstein Sycamore, author of Sketchtasy


      These stories are exquisite portals into the weird, scary, hilarious, hot, and revelatory moments that make up a queer life. I recognized Manning's characters immediately: they are me, my friends, my guides, my mistakes. What an act of humanity to have written them. -Melissa Febos, author of Whip Smart and Abandon Me


      From its first sentence Corinne Manning's We Had No Rules feels essential, every word charged with meaning and feeling. This book is nothing less than a record of survival, a nervous system on the page, a sequence of stories in which characters attempt to make better, truer relationships that want to defy the structures of language that constrict us. Expansive, soulful, vulnerable, sexy, funny, and broken, We Had No Rules is queer all the way down to its bones. -Paul Lisicky, author of Later and The Narrow Door


      Corinne Manning's smart, funny debut collection is a necessary reminder that individuals are more than any one single identity. These characters are the best mix of surprising and recognizable that any reader of good short stories could ever hope to find. Brava! -Rebecca Brown, author of The Gifts of the Body


      This debut short story collection from Seattle-based writer, artist, and teacher Corinne Manning is exactly the kind of book the queer canon needs ... As necessary as it is delightful, We Had No Rules is not to be missed. -Literary Hub

      A powerful testament to the complexity of identity and desire. -Kirkus Reviews


      Manning's debut collection exquisitely examines queer relationships with equal parts humor, heartache, and titillation ... This enriching view of queer worlds unpacks narratives that have always been there, even if they're not often seen. -Publishers Weekly (STARRED REVIEW)


      Wistful, funny, angry, bitter, raw - Manning both shocks and enthralls. -Booklist (STARRED REVIEW)


      Corinne Manning's nuanced and interconnected short stories explore queerness through the lens of rules, and rules through the lens of queerness. -Shelf Awareness


      An intimate, rebellious and often hilarious exploration of queer life in the U.S. in the 21st Century. -Lambda Literary

      Manning [weaves] a neon cat's cradle of complex characters whose questions and desires push on the constraints and freedoms of both. -Seattle Times


      The unvarnished, unapologetic stories in Manning's unflinching first fiction collection offer a warts-and-all look at contemporary queer people and the damage we knowingly or unknowingly inflict upon one another. -Oprahmag.com


      The unvarnished, unapologetic stories in Manning's unflinching first fiction collection offer a warts-and-all look at contemporary queer people and the damage we knowingly or unknowingly inflict upon one another. -O, the Oprah Magazine


      Manning harnesses language to create space around characters; this makes for an intriguing and impressive collection. -Herizons


      Where language fails, Manning's stories triumph. Their exquisite prose in this collection is further elevated by a focus on relationships and what it means to be a flawed person in a broken world. But therein lies the raw beauty of the book: the characters' humanity is on full display as they navigate complicated, impossible situations. -Chicago Review of Books

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    9781551527932 Paperback POETRY / LGBT Publication Date:February 21, 2020
    $17.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.4 in | 210 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      In her novels, poetry, and prose, Amber Dawn has written eloquently on queer femme sexuality, individual and systemic trauma, and sex work justice, themes drawn from her own lived experience and revealed most notably in her award-winning memoir How Poetry Saved My Life.

      In this, her second poetry collection, Amber Dawn takes stock of the costs of coming out on the page in a heartrendingly honest and intimate investigation of the toll that artmaking takes on artists. These long poems offer difficult truths within their intricate narratives that are alternately incendiary, tender, and rapturous.

      In a cultural era when intersectional and marginalized writers are topping bestseller lists, Amber Dawn invites her readers to take an unflinching look at what we expect from writers, and from each other.

      Includes a foreword by writer Doretta Lau.

      Bio

      Amber Dawn is the author of the novels Sodom Road Exit (2018) and Sub Rosa (winner of a Lambda Literary Award, 2010), the Vancouver Book Award-winning memoir How Poetry Saved My Life (2013), and the Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize-nominated poetry collection Where the words end and my body begins (2015). She is also editor of Fist of the Spider Woman: Tales of Fear and Queer Desire and co-editor of Hustling Verse: An Anthology of Sex Workers' Poetry and With a Rough Tongue. Her most recent book is My Art Is Killing Me and Other Poems. She teaches creative writing at Douglas College in Vancouver, and also leads several low-barrier community writing classes.

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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      In gorgeous, incisive poems, Amber Dawn challenges us to rethink our closely held imaginations about sex, sex work, women, violence, and the making of art. This book is both an interrogation of the self as artist and an expose of the ways in which we are all complicit in the very systems we want to dismantle. Under the compassionate surgery of Amber Dawn's words, I felt like I was being remade. My Art is Killing Me should be required reading for everyone. -SJ Sindu, author of Marriage of a Thousand Lies
      In her brilliant new collection, Amber Dawn documents, probes, and analyzes her own 'happily ever after' success story of a sex worker turned award-winning writer. As you (literally you) read this book, you are continually confronted with the question of who consumes sex worker experiences, to what end, and at what cost comes that consumption. 'We fail to see / nearby violence while we naively imagine distant violence,' Amber Dawn laments, and you don't need to look further for nearby violence than the polite world of institutional CanLit. When new traumas arise, Amber Dawn concocts new spells for healing in this book woven of magic, testament and prayer. These poems deftly slip among registers, languages, experiences, and traditions to tell a whole-hearted, full-bodied, and totally essential truth. -Sachiko Murakami, author of Get Me Out of Here
      Urgent, necessary and powerful, these poems lay bare the hypocrisy of a society that demands truth then systematically destroys those who dare speak it. With lyric dexterity and stunning insight, Amber Dawn details the difficult trajectory of creating art from life while navigating institutions steeped in structural oppression. There's no overstating the value and importance of this book, a lifeline to survivors, a turning point, a reckoning. -Nancy Lee, author of The Age
      Amber Dawn's virtuosic, five-octave-range powerhouse My Art is Killing Me and Other Poems rang through me like a bell. I swear certain lines tolled inside me like they've always been there, waiting to be struck. This book lays bare the risk and reward of making art about trauma and the audacious possibility of healing in a world that feels like a burning house, moving from lyricism to cultural criticism to formal experimentation and back. I could smell this collection on me for weeks. -Domenica Martinello, author of All Day I Dream about Sirens
      Amber Dawn's poems are rituals of beauty, courage and fierce rage. -Vancouver Sun
      Amber Dawn's sense of place and style is bewitching ... This is a deeply personal collection that also offers a worthwhile opportunity for readers to evaluate themselves. -Quill and Quire

      Poetry is visceral and expansive. And for readers of Amber Dawn, poetry is an act to speak your truth. Through the various expressions of her poetry, whether hiss or hymn, she names abuses of power in certain spaces and communities. By doing so, she shows us how poetry can witness us speaking out in myriad ways. -rabble.ca

  • 8
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    The Gospel of Breaking Jillian Christmas Canada
    9781551527970 Paperback POETRY / LGBT Publication Date:February 21, 2020
    $14.95 CAD 6 x 8 x 0.4 in | 145 gr | 80 pages Carton Quantity:68 Canadian Rights: Y Arsenal Pulp Press
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      In The Gospel of Breaking, Jillian Christmas confirms what followers of her performance and artistic curation have long known: there is magic in her words. Befitting someone who "speaks things into being," Christmas extracts from family history, queer lineage, and the political landscape of a racialized life to create a rich, softly defiant collection of poems.

      Christmas draws a circle around the things she calls "holy": the family line that cannot find its root but survived to fill the skies with radiant flesh; the body, broken and unbroken and broken and new again; the lover lost, the friend lost, and the loss itself; and the hands that hold them all with brilliant, tender care. Expansive and beautiful, these poems allow readers to swim in Jillian Christmas's mother-tongue and to dream at her shores.

      Bio

      Jillian Christmas is the former Artistic Director of Vancouver's Verses Festival of Words. An educator, organizer, and advocate in the arts community, utilizing an anti-oppressive lens, Jillian has performed and facilitated workshops across North America. She lives in Vancouver.


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    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews
      I am taken by the adventurous forms that leap off the page in The Gospel of Breaking and how those forms are complemented by the ability of Jillian Christmas. The winding forms are held together by pristine imagery, a crisp attention to narrative, and illuminating metaphor. This book, among many other things, is a showcase of how many different ways a poet can show themselves to be dazzling. -Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib, author of They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us
      The Gospel of Breaking is both a tender and swift-kicking collection. From gentle folk poems of love, longing, and community to Tobagonian family narratives and confident spoken word pieces in Canadian West Coast vernacular, this work shows a poet shifting between the flexible power of performance and the immovable page. These are the witch hymns of becoming. They are the proud songs of a queer, black, unapologetic womxn on the rise with the breeze of the Pacific Northwest and Caribbean at her back. In her own words, 'reminder to the audience: / there is a bright body alive on the stage / invite them into the space / can you feel their generous bending / swell of a praise-song quick and rocking at the back of our throats.' -Tanya Evanson, author of Nouveau Griot
      Jillian Christmas is incantatory and disarming, sensitive and cerebral, fiercely defiant and courageously tender. 'I love hard as I know how,' she writes, distilling the project of our time. -David Chariandy, author of Brother and Soucouyant
      Jillian Christmas richly expresses the revered and the intimate, handling readers with care. -Quill and Quire

      An amazing and beautiful collection of poems. -Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian


      In her incandescent debut volume The Gospel of Breaking, Christmas has given readers a chance to hear her heart beating. -Vancouver Sun

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