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New Star Books Winter 2020 / Spring 2020

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  • 1
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    9781554201556 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs Publication Date:May 28, 2020 Print Run:1000
    $22.00 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.33 in | 0.36 kg | 272 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      From the author of What Species of Creatures, Sharon Kirsch, comes The Smallest Objective, an intricate and melancholy personal memoir about a daughter's last days with her mother, the hidden recesses of family history, and the treasures that the past can bring in the face of a difficult present.

      Having moved her elderly mother into a care home, the author of The Smallest Objective must now empty the family home of half a century, discovering as she does so a series of small objects that unlock her family's past: a lantern slide, a faded recipe book, a postcard from Mexico, a nugget of fool's gold.

      With the object of saving off grief while attending to her mother's final days, Sharon embarks on a quest to retrieve the origin and circumstances surrounding each of these articles. Along the way, she discovers the stories of several early- to mid-century Montreal Jewish personalities — a Runyonesque hustler, a Lithuanian botanist, and a self-made young woman — as well as the extent to which they were punctured and shaped by the muffled anti-Semitism of the time.

      The Smallest Objective examines the minutiae of lives lived, our concern for senior members of our family, the time we need to sift, take stock, and filter out the important things, and the consolation offered by staying close to loved ones even when we can't reach them.
      Bio
      Sharon Kirsch is the author of What Species of Creatures (2008), a book of creative non-fiction about first encounters between early settlers to North America and unfamiliar "beasts."

      A writer and an editor, she has published fiction, narrative non-fiction, and journalism, most recently in subTerrain and Room magazines.

      Sharon Kirsch is originally from Montreal and has lived in the US and the UK, the latter as a Commonwealth Scholar for postgraduate study in Middle English literature. She is a graduate of the Humber School for Writers Correspondence Program. She currently is based in Toronto. More about her is available from sharonkirsch.com.
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      Awards
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      "Akin to an intricately detailed slide under a microscope, this suite of stories, in fact, a collection of newly discovered memories, is a familial jigsaw puzzle — a series of mysteries, reassembled by way of meticulous research and the astute observation of a writer in her prime." — Bill Arnott, The Miramichi Reader
  • 2
    catalogue cover
    9781554201563 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:May 28, 2020
    $18.00 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.31 in | 0.24 kg | 128 pages Carton Quantity:64 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      Since his first book, The Mood Embosser, was published in 2001, Louis Cabri has established himself as a one of the most distinctive, and entertaining, poets in Canada. Steeped in the transformative poetics of the post-New American Poetry world of L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, Cabri has followed that impulse into a fresh terrain that is simultaneously familiar and disorientingly strange. Hungry Slingshots, Cabri's fourth book-length work, extends his explorations into language / sensibility / intelligibility, and into the sheer sound (and silence) of the line to produce a suite of poems that return a picquant critique of the excess that stands in for contemporary normality.

      Original, in the original sense of the word (i.e., returning to the earliest examples of something), Cabri’s recent work opens up the the resonating chambers of constraints imposed by poetry conventions --- most noticeably in the title sequence, “Hungry Sling Shots”, which hearkens to the French 17th century civil war and the widespread use of the triolet form --- to make our oldest literary genre vibrate in new ways and in unexpectedly contemporary directions.

      Predominant in Cabri’s approach to the page is his consciousness of poetry as being, at its most satisfyingly salient, sound. For Cabri, more than most poets working today, meaning is all about how it sounds. In a live reading, his intonations work like the squeaks and farts of a perfectly tuned saxophone in the mouth and hands of a jazz musician. Could Louis Cabri be the Albert Ayler of contemporary poetry?

      Louis Cabri has said about his work, “Fiction and non-fiction, more often than not, represent perceptions. Poetry involves more than representing perceptions. .. . Poetry speaks to the mechanics of perception."
      Bio
      Louis Cabri is a teacher (of poetry, theory, and creative writing, at the University of Windsor) and critic (his writing considers work by Bruce Andrews, Ted Greenwald, Harryette Mullen, Frank O’Hara, Catriona Strang, Fred Wah, Lissa Wolsak, Ezra Pound, and Louis Zukofsky. As well, he examines poetry’s “social command” propounded by Osip Brik and Vladimir Mayakovsky, and the literary nonce-word). He is the author of Posh Lust (2014), Poetryworld (2011), and The Mood Embosser (2001), one of Small Press Traffic’s Poetry Books of the Year. In addition, he is editor of The False Laws of Narrative by Fred Wah (2009) and wrote the Foreword to Flow: Poems Collected and New by Roy Miki (2019). Born in Montreal, he lives and writes in Windsor, Ontario.

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  • 3
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    Writing and Reading Essays George Bowering Canada
    9781554201549 Paperback LITERARY CRITICISM / Books & Reading Publication Date:November 28, 2019
    $18.00 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.25 in | 220 gr | 176 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      In the course of a writing life that has spanned more than five decades and encompasses almost eighty books of fiction, poetry, history, and criticism he's written and another thirty that he's played an editorial role in, George Bowering has learned a thing or two about the craft.

      Writing and Reading features thirty recent essays, ranging from a single paragraph to 12,000 words, spanning the range of the author's curiosity, which includes collecting, difficulty, film, painting, photography, music, and Vancouver's poets from Apollinaire and Blaise Cendrars to the present day. Bowering writes perceptively about his encounters with texts, and writers, including David Bromige, Judith Fitzgerald, Gerard Manley Hoplins, Robert Kroetsch, Michael Ondaatje, Joe Rosenblatt, and every book he read in 1967, Canada's centennial year.

      Running through Writing and Reading is the theme of reading — and paying attention — and its centrality to any writing practice.
      Bio

      Born in 1935 and raised in the southern Okanagan town of Oliver, BC, George Bowering has won the Governor-General’s Award for both Poetry (in 1969, for Rocky Mountain Foot) and Fiction (in 1980, for Burning Water).

      George Bowering was Canada’s first Parliamentary Poet-Laureate, and is a member of the Order of Canada as well as the Order of British Columbia. His most recent books include No One (fiction, 2018), Ten Women (short stories, 2015), The World, I Guess (poetry, 2015), and, with George Stanley, Some End / West Broadway (poetry, 2018).

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        • Vancouver book launch
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        • Targeted review copy distribution

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      Awards
      Reviews
      "What's fun to read is the pleasure Bowering takes in writing as 'an old coot' — after long years in the writing game, he can laugh at himself. But the poet-professor still has veteran chops and can use an offbeat, apparently unrelated story to suddenly crystallize his point. ... It's artful writing about writing and reading from a guy who remains an indelible part-of-the-scene." — Trevor Carolan, subTerrain
      "The volume is an important addition to his body of late work. Whatever his idiosyncrasies, Bowering is never dull." — Nicholas Bradley, The Ormsby Review
      "And it's exactly this sort of wide-eyed freshness that makes it easy to keep coming back to this book, dipping into it for a little bit more, a little bit more. I suppose that's one of the beauties about a book like this. You don't need to read it front to back. You can poke around, sampling a bit of this, and then go back for a bit more of that when you're ready." — Heidi Greco, BC Bookworld
  • 4
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    Shot Rock Michael Tregebov Canada
    9781554201532 Paperback FICTION / Jewish Publication Date:September 26, 2019
    $22.00 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.25 in | 0.31 kg | 220 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      When the smell of October's raked leaves gives way to that of morning frost, a mature Winnipeg man's fancy turns to thoughts of curling.

      But this fall Blackie Timmerman has been hogging stones off the ice. His wife of twenty years Deirdre has left him; his precocious son Tino has moved out of the house and into political radicality, mentored by a relentlessly principled Michael MacGiligary, scion of the Winnipeg establishment. The two share a devotion to curling and revolutionary socialism, as well as a friendship whose closeness and secretiveness alarm Blackie on every level.

      And now, his north-end Jewish curling rink, the Queen Victoria, Winnipeg's friendliest club, and most dilapidated, is going to be sold and the club disbanded come spring — if the Executive, led by Max Foxman and his clique of nouveaux riches, gets their way.

      The 1970s will be cruel to Blackie, who had expected they would be the gravy on the veal cutlet of an honest modest life. Spurred on by Michael, the only non-Jewish curler at the Queen Victoria, and Tino, both of whom are impatient to make a big political histoire — combatting injustice and alienation — Blackie and his curling team, Suddy and Duddy, Oz, and their kibitzer Chickie, decide to take on Max Foxman and the South Enders to deliver the club from the fate of becoming a supermarket, and their having to curl on alien ice in the South End.

      It's class war on and off the rink, where all is fair, even Duddy's attempt to seduce Max Foxman's wife Sophie, the girl Max Foxman had stolen from Blackie while our hero was part of the Canadian army invading Sicily in WWII. When not distracted by the nostalgia of lost love and gallantry, Blackie believes that curling finesse and canvassing can swing enough club members to vote down Max Foxman, so that for once the North End guys will sit shot rock.
      Bio

      Michael Tregebov was born in 1954 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. He graduated from the University of Manitoba with a BA in English. His first book of poems, Changehouse, was published by Turnstone Press in Winnipeg in 1976. That same year he began an MFA in Creative Writing at the University of British Columbia.

      He received his MFA in Creative Writing in spring 1978, immediately after which he moved to Barcelona, where he learned Spanish and, accidentally, Catalan. He returned to Vancouver in 1979 and begin a Masters in English at Simon Fraser University. After dropping out of SFU he returned to Barcelona in the fall of 1981, where he has made his home ever since.

      In addition to teaching English and Spanish translation and 19th and 20th century American literature at the American Institute of Barcelona (Institut d'Estudis Nordamericans) from 1984-88; and at the neo-liberal Jesuit-run ESADE from 1989 until his retirement in 2005. During that time and until the present he has translated and dubbed Spanish travel programs and industrial American TV shows, including a hundred episodes of Star Trek (both generations) and The Equalizer into Catalan and Spanish, a million-plus words in corporate, tax and labour law and another million in chartered accountancy for PriceWaterhouseCoopers Spain, the capitalist police, as well as a book of essays (Escribir y ser) by Nadine Gordimer, and translations in areas stretching from art history to perfume.

      In 2009, his novel The Briss was short-listed for the Commonwealth Writers Prize (first novel category) and optioned for film. The Briss was followed by The Shiva in 2012. In 2015 Penguin Random House Lumen published his translation of, and prologue to, William Carlos Williams's Kora in Hell in their best-selling William Carlos Williams Poesía reunida, chosen by El País as one of the best books released in Spain and Latin America in 2015. Shot Rock is his third novel.

      Michael Tregebov lives with Virginia, his wife of 39 years, in El Masnou, a Catalan coastal town just north of Barcelona.

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      Awards
      Reviews
      "Tregebov has captured so many of the sights and sounds of a bygone era that it is bound to bring a smile to the face of even the most jaded of Winnipeggers." — Bernie Bellan, The Jewish Post & News
      "Imagine Richler, Lenny Bruce and Sarah Silverman collaborating to bring the best of their distinctive genius for comedy to bear on a Canadian content epic about the diaspora, curling and leftism." — Tom Sandborn, Vancouver Sun
  • 5
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    9781554201525 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 19, 2019
    $18.00 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.25 in | 0.2 kg | 112 pages Carton Quantity:75 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description

      "Hailed by the Call as I stepped across
      Venables at Clark following a transverse line
      like all the other commodities circulating aimlessly
      I drifted along corrugated steel walls
      sun burning every body every building every form
      cash exploding from crowns of distant towers
      occupied by the rentiers in this haemopolis of
      arteries and conduits branching out centrifugally."


      At some point in the last decade, the "unreal cities" of Modernity became post-Real. Roger Farr's I Am a City Still But Soon I Shan't Be metabolizes the modernist long poem in order to provide a psychogeographical I-witness account of this transformation.

      In nine Cantos, or spheres of hell, Farr moves impossibly between major and minor cities, crossing and re-crossing zones, edging boundaries, charting dreamscapes, always drifting, without ever becoming a flaneur.

      Vancouver stars in "pre-conceptual" found footage from 1973, which is actually a dream of the future. New York is an "elegant incubator" for the new avant-gardes, who are preparing for another civil war. Berlin is a nightclub, or a mall, that "kettles" its negations. Nanaimo is a necropolis seen through a lens held by the hand of a dead poet. Meanwhile a statue of Artemis explodes from the streets in Siracusa, setting off a riot during the 2010 Olympics. Urban streams, flows of capital, and other bodily fluids run the course of the tour. But there is no outside to Room 514 in the Patricia Hotel.

      In her review in Canadian Literature of Farr's last book, the Livesay-nominated IKMQ (New Star, 2012), Melissa Dalgleish observes that "Farr's I is particularly complex." Readers of I Am a City Still But Soon I Shan't Be might come to recognize such lyric complexity as a shared condition of life in the "post-human cities" from which we chart our lines of flight.

      Bio
      Described as "a poet of great heart and aesthetic/political commitment", Roger Farr is the author Surplus (LINEBooks, 2006), Means (LINEBooks, 2012), and IKMQ (New Star, 2012), a finalist for the BC Book Prize in Poetry in 2013. His most recent book is I Am a City Still But Soon I Shan't Be (2019).

      A former member of the artist-run Kootenay School of Writing collective, Roger Farr's critical writing on avant-garde poetics and radical social movements has appeared in Anarchist Studies, Armed Cell, Fifth Estate, Perspectives on Anarchist Theory, The Poetic Front, West Coast Line, and XCP: Cross Cultural Poetics. He edited the three-volume anthology Open Text: Canadian Poetry and Poetics in the 21st Century (2008–2013), and was Critical Editor for Alice Becker-Ho's The Essence of Jargon: Argot & the Language of the Dangerous Classes (2015). Currently he is editing The Amourous Comrade, a collection of writing on anarchist sexual politics by É. Armand. A book of variations based on the writing of 15th century poet François Villon is also forthcoming. He is Convener of Creative Writing at Capilano University in Vancouver.
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      Awards
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      "The wager — the excitement of this book — is how radically and openly we are thrown into the project of thinking and feeling our way through the contemporary — no assumed 'truths,' no established 'methods' or 'theories' or 'ideology' — just the ineradicable will to resist. Poetry has always been there when nothing else is left. This is poetry as the last stand — but the magic is that it reads as much like poetry as the first skirmish of what is to come." — Stephen Collis, The Capilano Review
  • 6
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    Collapsible Tim Conley Canada
    9781554201518 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:February 28, 2019
    $18.00 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.5 in | 0.22 kg | 192 pages Carton Quantity:60 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      The short story form is unambiguously un-dead in this new album of thirty fictions from writer Tim Conley, coming at the reader in a variety of shapes and guises running the gamut from elliptical micro-fictions to tales of the inexplicable.

      Steeped in Beckett, Borges and Nabokov, Conley's multiple universes allow for werewolves that excite ridicule not fear, and where birthdays are an occasion for forgetting not remembering. Here, the world greets a new colouring book with the same seriousness as it might some newly discovered gospel, and struggles to embrace fictional celebrities with the same ardour it reserves for real ones. And why not a variant of origami that is used on the human form?



      "In this witty and dynamic new collection, Tim Conley shows us how reality, the story, and the human are a single marvellously entangled surface. Like a Moebius Strip, with all our surprise endings, paradoxes, mysteries, ambiguities, comedies, ingenuity and invention, we are our stories and our stories are us. In the tradition of Calvino, Lydia Davis, Borges and Kafka, these short fictions explore the strangeness, curiosity, beauty, contradiction, humour and delightful discombobulation of being alive and of being alive to the telling tale."

      — Gary Barwin, author of Yiddish for Pirates, winner, Stephen Leacock Medal, Canadian Jewish Literary Award, and finalist for the Governor-General’s Literary Award and the Scotiabank Giller prize.


      "This new collection is exploratory, and I mean that in the most laudatory sense. The stories of Collapsible are like dexterous, astonishingly articulate fish, darting just beyond our grasp within waves of distortion and illumination while writhing in their scaly, original beauty. Tim Conley writes out of his own fierce, delightful curiosity. He will inspire you to read and write and think with more audacity."

      — Spencer Gordon, author of Cruise Missile Liberals and Cosmo.
      Bio
      Tim Conley is the author of several books of fiction, poetry, and criticism, including Dance Moves of the Near Future (New Star, 2015) and Unless Acted Upon (Mansfield Press, 2019). He teaches English at Brock University, and has published widely on Joyce, Nabokov, and other aspects of twentieth-century literature.
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      Awards
      Reviews
      "Outstanding ... Conley's combinations of surreal plot developments and silly comedy alongside often sincere, even sentimental character moments has drawn comparisons to Franz Kafka and Italo Calvino, but a better comparison might be the rarely read but stunningly brilliant Robert Walser, whose microfictions remains some of the greatest in history. At his best, Conley recalls Walser's strange, quiet, near-mystical and somewhat mystifying moments. ... electric and exciting, dense but breezy, and exceptionally well-crafted." — Jonathan Ball, Winnipeg Free Press
      "Conley's stories are never so determined as to suggest a rigid or incontestable meaning; the title of the collection can refer to the form and function of the short story itself, which the author delights in stretching, reducing, altering, or contorting in pursuit of idiosyncratic modes of expression." — Steven W. Beattie, Quill & Quire
  • 7
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    Mudflat Dreaming Waterfront Battles and the Squatters Who Fought Them in 1970s Vancouver Jean Walton
    9781554201495 Paperback HISTORY / Social History Publication Date:October 04, 2018
    $24.00 CAD 6.75 x 9.75 x 0.5 in | 0.39 kg | 204 pages Carton Quantity:26 Canadian Rights: Y Transmontanus
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      Description

      Mudflat Dreaming tells the story of two communities on Vancouver's waterfront fringes in the 1970s.

      On the North Shore, a counter-cultural village of float houses and shacks on stilts sprouted on the estuarial Maplewood Mudflats. A few miles to the south, on the southern banks of the Fraser River above New Westminster, the long-established Bridgeview neighbourhood was mired in an endless battle with local city council for basic amenities.

      As a teenager, Jean Walton lived just up the hill from Bridgeview, but it was only much later that the author learned about the struggle embroiling her near neighbours, as well as its connection to the Maplewood Mudflat squatter community — not to mention Malcolm Lowry and Habitat 76.

      Walton's way into these stories is through a few documentary films made at the time about Bridgeview and Maplewood, as well as Robert Altman's breakthrough feature film, McCabe and Mrs. Miller, shot just a few miles up the mountainside from the Maplewood Mudflats.

      Mudflat Dreaming traverses the intersecting domains of activist and documentary film, waterfront environmentalism, urban land use, utopian experiments, and working class struggle.



      "Mudflat Dreaming is a wonderfully evocative account of the varied ways in which an alternative Vancouver was imagined, constructed and lived by its residents in the 1970s. From waterfront squatting to protests over basic amenities, the book recovers a city that has long since disappeared but whose history remains as important as ever. A timely and urgent reminder of what it means to think about and inhabit cities differently."

      — Alexander Vasudevan, author of The Autonomous City: A History of Urban Squatting


      "Jean Walton's lively account of two quite different communities in the 1970s resisting a growing "culture of cement" appears at a time when Vancouver's neighbourhoods are being eaten up by that same cement. Part oral history, part film archive research, Mudflat Dreaming resuscitates the spirit of opposition to uniformity and profit-making at the expense of those who recycle, self-build, and live by water. This is necessary history, rooted in place and deeply West Coast."

      Daphne Marlatt


      "Squatters, shackers, beachfront bohemians, whatever you want to call them, they've been a neglected chapter of Vancouver's history for too long. Now Jean Walton has rescued two of these communities from obscurity in her vivid and thoughtful account. With the city fast becoming a gated community for the super-rich, Walton's story of alternative ways of imagining community couldn't be more timely."

      — Daniel Francis

      Bio
      Jean Walton has spent the last twenty-five years as a professor at the University of Rhode Island, teaching courses on literature of World War I, activist documentary, seventies pop cultural films, and all waves of feminist theory. She divides her time between Providence, RI; Maine; and the Fraser Valley outside Vancouver, where she grew up.
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  • 8
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    9x11 and other poems like Bird, Nine, x, and Eleven Michael Turner Canada
    9781554201501 Paperback POETRY / Canadian Publication Date:September 11, 2018
    $18.00 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 0.25 in | 0.14 kg | 92 pages Carton Quantity:83 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      ‘A small room behind a bay window. A single bed, a table and chair, and a sink. I could manage something larger, with more conveniences, but I could never match the view.’

      How you view 21st century life depends largely on the view from your place, which depends on where you can afford to live. In this suite of texts and poems written over twenty years that span the infamous towers, Michael Turner drops in to see what condition he's in, a subject whipped into insistence by the rhythms that shape his city, his neighbourhood, his universe.

      What arises out of the debris of these towers is a vision of contemporary history that sees them — their creation and destruction — existing within a web of capital relations that leave no landlord or office worker unturned.

      In her Globe and Mail review of Turner's “startlingly straightforward and minimalist” 8x10 (New Star, 2009), Zoe Whitall concludes: “8x10 is an unsettling and daring work, a tangible symbol of our anxious world and the stark emotional devastation of war. I hope Turner starts a trend in Canadian literature, because Canada needs more writers like him.”



      "Reading Michael Turner's extraordinary 9x11 I was reminded of Christa Wolf's Accident, how global crisis intensifies the daily — except that in Turner's/our current state disruption has become the new norm. Disruption both terrifies and excites the poet — the stacked monotony of skyscrapers is broken both by the horror of people leaping out of buildings and by Mallarme's thrilling abandonment of vertical structure in "Un coup de dés jamais n'abolira le hasard" (1897). All the reflections and contemplative rhymes add up to a holographic text that begs repeated reading. "9 x 11" is a date, a disaster, and the measurements of the poet's room. For Turner architecture is a form of poetic divination, and poetry is a form of architecture. Living in a city, community is inevitable — coffee house / apartment building / poetry peers — and despite his caution, Turner's tense heart proves very big."

      — Dodie Bellamy
      Bio
      Michael Turner was born in North Vancouver, B.C. in 1962 and spent his teenage summers working in the Skeena River salmon fishery. After high school, he travelled through Europe and North Africa, eventually to the University of Victoria, where he completed a BA (anthropology) in 1986. Between 1987-1993 he sang and played banjo in Hard Rock Miners; upon his retirement from touring, he opened the Malcolm Lowry Room (1993-1997). His first book, Company Town (Arsenal Pulp, 1991), was nominated for a Dorothy Livesay Poetry Prize. His second book, Hard Core Logo (Arsenal Pulp, 1993), was adapted to feature-film. Kingsway (1995), American Whiskey Bar (Arsenal Pulp, 1997), The Pornographer’s Poem (Doubleday, 1999) and 8x10 (New Star, 2009) followed. A frequent collaborator, he has written scripts with Stan Douglas, poems with Geoffrey Farmer and songs with cub, Dream Warriors, Fishbone and Kinnie Starr. He blogs at this address [email protected].
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  • 9
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    if wants to be the same as is Essential Poems of David Bromige Jack Krick Canada, Bob Perelman, David Bromige Canada, Ron Silliman, George Bowering Canada
    9781554201341 Paperback POETRY / American Publication Date:June 21, 2018
    $45.00 CAD 6.75 x 9.75 x 1.5 in | 1.2 kg | 624 pages Carton Quantity:8 Canadian Rights: Y New Star Books
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      Description
      Drawn from 22 books of poetry published by David Bromige in his lifetime, if wants to be the same as is chronicles the career of one of contemporary poetry's most distinctive writers. Born in London, England, in 1933, raised in Canada, and a resident for most of his adult life of California, David Bromige is just as difficult to pin down in terms of his aesthetics. As a student at the University of BC in the early 1960s, Bromige met writers like Fred Wah, George Bowering, and Jamie Reid, who pointed him towards the American postmodernists, and eventually, to a scholarship to UC–Berkeley. There, he became immersed in the Bay Area's explosively creative poetry scene, and came to be associated with many of the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets. Bromige's own work, however, holds wide appeal and from the start resisted any sort of classification, winning praise across the literary-critical spectrum. His publishers included Black Sparrow Press (Bukowski's publisher), Sun & Moon, Brick, and The Figures, and he won acclaim from the likes of Robert Hass, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He died in Sebastopol, California, in 2009. if wants to be the same as is presents a life's work that is, in the words of Bob Perelman, "beautiful, deeply amusing, continually surprising."


      "He is among the three or four most significant writers of his generation ... He is an outstanding story-teller, and ... at the same time, he is capable of great lyrical moments in which the full resonance of ear and eye are brought to a focus ... uncompromising in his commitment to the full complexity of poetry as a language art."

      — Michael Davidson


      "Outstanding in his generation out of Canada for me has been the work of David Bromige ... He has gained the art and language in which he brings his readers deeper than any consideration of a personality to the awareness of a living man."

      — Robert Duncan


      "There is no more brilliantly inventive poet writing in the United States at this time ... a poet of enormous intellect, humor and innovation who is always shifting out from under the solutions of the last book and posing new questions and linguistic possibilities for a song."

      — Kathleen Fraser
      Bio
      Drawn from 22 books of poetry published by David Bromige in his lifetime, if wants to be the same as is chronicles the career of one of contemporary poetry's most distinctive writers.

      Born in London, England, in 1933, raised in Canada, and a resident for most of his adult life of California, David Bromige is just as difficult to pin down in terms of his aesthetics. As a student at the University of BC in the early 1960s, Bromige met writers like Fred Wah, George Bowering, and Jamie Reid, who pointed him towards the American postmodernists, and eventually, to a scholarship to UC-Berkeley. There, he became immersed in the Bay Area's explosively creative poetry scene, and came to be associated with many of the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets.

      Bromige's own work, however, holds wide appeal and from the start resisted any sort of classification, winning praise across the literary-critical spectrum. His publishers included Black Sparrow Press (Bukowski's publisher), Sun & Moon, Brick, and The Figures, and he won acclaim from the likes of Robert Hass, the Poetry Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts. He died in Sebastopol, California, in 2009.

      if wants to be the same as is presents a life's work that is, in the words of Bob Perelman, "beautiful, deeply amusing, continually surprising."
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  • 10
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    The Big Note A Guide to the Recordings of Frank Zappa Charles Ulrich Canada
    9781554201464 Paperback MUSIC / Individual Composer & Musician Publication Date:May 13, 2018
    $45.00 CAD 6.75 x 9.75 x 1.88 in | 1.29 kg | 800 pages Carton Quantity:6 New Star Books
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      Description

      Based on careful listening to authorized and unauthorized recordings, and drawing on hundreds of interviews, letters, and e-mail interviews with scores of musicians, singers, engineers, artists, copyists, and others who worked with Zappa, The Big Note is the complete guide to the music of Frank Zappa.

      The product of more than fifteen years of research by Charles Ulrich, The Big Note provides detailed commentary on 1,663 tracks spanning 100 albums recorded over 35 years, backed up by 1,773 citations. Ulrich's book provides the liner notes that every album in the protean and prolific composer's oeuvre cries out for; it is the indispensible resource for any FZ fan or scholar.

      Who's playing what on each track? When was this recorded? How did FZ put this together? Just what is the Apostolic Blurch Injector? What the heck are we listening to, anyway, and why does it sound so familiar?



      "An astonishing 15-year work of research, Ulrich has created the ultimate encyclopedia of all Zappa & Mothers recordings. The details of the sessions and of the musicians who participated are as fascinating as one of Frank's best compositions."

      — Art Tripp, Mothers of Invention percussionist, '68-'69


      "Charles Ulrich's The Big Note is your Amazingly Breathtakingly Complete, Definitively Encyclopedic, Frankly Gargantuan, Highly Interesting And Informative, Jaw-Droppingly Knowledgeable, Lovingly Monumentally Notoriously Obsessive, Precisely Quote-filled, Quintessentially Researched, Stupendously Terrifically Useful, Voluminously Weighty, Xenochronically Yeomanly Zappa-centric Guide to Conceptual Continuity. Destined to be the essential Zappa listening companion for the 21st century."

      — David Ocker, Zappa copyist, Synclavier assistant, and clarinetist, '77-'84


      "Charles's book will be the next best thing to being in the room with Frank."

      — Scott Thunes, Zappa bassist, '81-'88

      Bio
      Charles Ulrich attended Pomona College, where — like Frank Zappa — he was a disc jockey on KSPC-FM. He taught linguistics at ten universities in the United States and Canada. Since 1994 he has been active in the on-line Zappa fan community — on alt.fan.frank-zappa, zappateers.com, and his own website, The Planet Of My Dreams. He lives in Vancouver, BC.
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