has_publisher_logo

Advanced Search
 

Biblioasis Fall 2020

more
Titles per page
  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Risk Mark Kingwell Canada
    9781771963923 Paperback PHILOSOPHY / Ethics & Moral Philosophy Publication Date:October 13, 2020
    $14.95 CAD 4.5 x 7.75 x 0.56 in | 140 gr Carton Quantity:100 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      With COVID-19 comes a heightened sense of everyday risk. How should a society manage, distribute, and conceive of it?

      As we cope with the lengthening effects of the global COVID-19 pandemic, considerations of everyday risk have been more pressing, and inescapable. In the past, everyone engaged in some degree of risky behaviour, from mundane realities like taking a shower or getting into a car to purposely thrill-seeking activities like rock-climbing or BASE jumping. Many activities that seemed high-risk, such as flying, were claimed basically safe. But risk was, and always has been, a fact of life. With new focus on the risks of even leaving the safety of our homes, it’s time for a deeper consideration of risk itself. How do we manage and distribute risks? How do we predict uncertain outcomes? If risk can never be completely eliminated, can it perhaps be controlled? At the heart of these questions—which govern everything from waking up each day to the abstract mathematics of actuarial science—lie philosophical issues of life, death, and danger. Mortality is the event-horizon of daily risk. How should we conceive of it?

      Bio
      Mark Kingwell is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto and a contributing editor of Harper’s Magazine, and has written for publications ranging from Adbusters and the New York Times to the Journal of Philosophy and Auto Racing Digest. Among his twelve books of political and cultural theory are the national best-sellers Better Living and The World We Want. In order to secure financing for their continued indulgence he has also written about his various hobbies, including fishing, baseball, cocktails, and contemporary art.
      Marketing & Promotion

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for On Risk

      "Kingwell offers a slender, thoughtful, sometimes meandering disquisition on risk that “is inflected (or infected) by the virus, but not precisely about the virus—except as it grants new urgency to old questions of risk and politics. A host of cultural allusions—from Shakespeare to the Simpsons, Isaiah Berlin to Irving Berlin, Voltaire, Pascal, and Derrida—along with salient academic studies inspire Kingwell to examine the many contradictory ways that humans handle risk ... An entertaining gloss on an enduring conundrum."—Kirkus Reviews

      Praise for Mark Kingwell

      “Kingwell is dauntingly well-read … a gifted noticer … a lively writer [who] cites The Simpsons as often as Immanuel Kant. [Readers] are rewarded with neat, unexpected insights.” —Globe & Mail

      “[Kingwell] has grown into a pretty clever jack-of-almost-everything.”—National Post

      “Mark Kingwell is a beautiful writer, a lucid thinker and a patient teacher … His insights are intellectual anchors in a fast-changing world.”—Naomi Klein

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Decline Stagnation, Nostalgia, and Why Every Year is the Worst One Ever Andrew Potter Canada
    9781771963947 Paperback PHILOSOPHY / Ethics & Moral Philosophy Publication Date:August 17, 2021
    $14.95 CAD 4.5 x 7.75 x 0.56 in | 110 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A Winnipeg Free Press Top Read of 2021

      What if David Bowie really was holding the fabric of the universe together?

      The death of David Bowie in January 2016 was a bad start to a year that got a lot worse: war in Syria, the Zika virus, terrorist attacks in Brussels and Nice, the Brexit vote—and the election of Donald Trump. The end-of-year wraps declared 2016 “the worst … ever.” Four even more troubling years later, the question of our apocalypse had devolved into a tired social media cliché. But when COVID-19 hit, journalist and professor of public policy Andrew Potter started to wonder: what if The End isn’t one big event, but a long series of smaller ones?

      In On Decline, Potter surveys the current problems and likely future of Western civilization (spoiler: it’s not great). Economic stagnation and the slowing of scientific innovation. Falling birth rates and environmental degradation. The devastating effects of cultural nostalgia and the havoc wreaked by social media on public discourse. Most acutely, the various failures of Western governments in their responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. If the legacy of the Enlightenment and its virtues—reason, logic, science, evidence—has run its course, how and why has it happened? And where do we go from here?

      Bio
      Andrew Potter is an associate professor (professional) at the Max Bell School of Public Policy. A former journalist, between 2011 and 2016 Andrew Potter was managing editor and then editor in chief of the Ottawa Citizen, and from 2006 to 2011 he was a public affairs columnist for Maclean’s Magazine. He is also a former Director of the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada. Potter is the author of The Authenticity Hoax: How We Get Lost Finding Ourselves, and the co-author, with Joseph Heath, of the best-selling book The Rebel Sell: Why the Culture Can’t be Jammed.
      Marketing & Promotion

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for On Decline

      "Terse, direct, provocative"—Mark Abley, The Walrus

      "Like its historic ancestors, On Decline deserves a wide general audience and should be required reading for the incoming federal government." Winnipeg Free Press

      Praise for Andrew Potter’s The Authenticity Hoax

      “Potter’s broad-ranging survey makes a good case that the authenticist fantasy is deeply embedded in the culture.”—Wall Street Journal

      “[Andrew Potter] offers a shrewd and lively discussion peppered with pop culture references and a stimulating reappraisal of the romantic strain in modern life.”—Publishers Weekly

      “Potter weaves elements of history, philosophy and pop culture together in a book that will leave an impression even if it doesn’t necessarily show us the path. Is Andrew Potter one of the great thinkers of our age? He may well be: this is great stuff.”—January Magazine

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Reaching Mithymna Among the Volunteers and Refugees on Lesvos Steven Heighton Canada
    9781771963763 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Personal Memoirs Publication Date:September 15, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.68 in | 280 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A poet’s firsthand account of a month volunteering on the frontlines of the Syrian refugee crisis.

      In the fall of 2015, Steven Heighton made an overnight decision to travel to the frontlines of the Syrian refugee crisis in Greece and enlist as a volunteer. He arrived on the isle of Lesvos with a duffel bag and a dubious grasp of Greek, his mother's native tongue, and worked on the landing beaches and in OXY-—a jerrybuilt, ad hoc transit camp providing simple meals, dry clothes, and a brief rest to refugees after their crossing from Turkey. In a town deserted by the tourists that had been its lifeblood, Heighton-—alongside the exhausted locals and under-equipped international aid workers—-found himself thrown into emergency roles for which he was woefully unqualified.

      From the brief reprieves of volunteer-refugee soccer matches to the riots of Camp Moria, Reaching Mithymna is a firsthand account of the crisis and an engaged exploration of the borders that divide us and the ties that bind.

      Bio

      Steven Heighton’s most recent books are The Nightingale Won’t Let You Sleep, a novel that has just been optioned for film, and The Waking Comes Late, which received the 2016 Governor General’s Award for Poetry. His work has received four gold National Magazine Awards and has appeared in Granta, Tin House, Zoetrope, London Review of Books, Best American Mystery Stories, Best American Poetry, TLR, and five editions of Best Canadian Stories. His novel Afterlands was cited on year-end lists in the USA, the UK, and Canada, and is in pre-production for film. In 2020 he will publish two books, a nonfiction account of the Middle Eastern refugee influx on Lesvos, Greece, and a children's book drawing on the same events. Heighton is also a translator, an occasional teacher, and a reviewer for the New York Times Book Review.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonfiction 2020, Short-listed
      Reviews

      Praise for Reaching Mithymna

      “The key to the book’s force is Heighton’s imperative to humanize and individualize everyone he encounters, from the volunteers—a ragtag gallery, constantly shifting as people move from one facility or camp to another—to the refugees themselves. There are few, if any, background figures; wherever possible, Heighton provides backstories and close observations of behaviour. These are not statistics but people, each sensitively depicted, captured in moments of extreme stress ... Reaching Mithymna is a stunning book, by turns heartbreaking and affirming, fundamentally human in its depth and scope. That it ends on a note balancing hope with loss, optimism with pain, is characteristic of its grace and power.”—Quill & Quire (starred review)

      “We know Steven Heighton as an award-winning poet and novelist. With Reaching Mithymna, he emerges as an indelible nonfiction writer. Combining his poetic sensibilities and storytelling skills with a documentarian’s eye, he has created a wrenching narrative from the front lines of the Syrian refugee crisis. In 2015, Heighton travelled to Greece, his mother’s homeland, equipped with a duffel bag, a notebook, and a conscience. Reaching Mithymna is a heart-rending story of humanity and sacrifice by a writer who put his own life on hold in a desperate and often futile attempt to help shipwrecked strangers find a safe and secure future for themselves and their children.”—2020 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Nonfiction jury (Helen Knott, Sandra Martin, and Ronald Wright)

      “Through his example in Reaching Mithymna, Steven Heighton offers us an alternative to armchair activism and outrage. Yes, with guts and compassion, we can step out of our safe, comfortable rooms and make a contribution to the alleviation of suffering. There is a way—regardless of our age, language, status, or abilities—to enter global conflicts responsibly. Heighton relays the horrors of the Syrian refugee crisis with the insight of first-hand experience and the ethics of a conscientious witness. His unforgettable portraits of volunteers and refugees remind us that politics are inextricable from human lives.”—Ian Williams, Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning author of Reproduction

      “Deeply personal and tender, Steven Heighton’s Reaching Mithymna never shies away from the self-critique that comes with being a witness to unfathomable human tragedy. There’s a uniquely fragile quality to Heighton’s beautiful narrative prose, one that only comes from an understanding of loss, uprootedness and exile, of what it means to reach out to that which remains elusive. Heighton gives voice to a multitude of colourful yet tragic characters faced with impossible dilemmas and their own shortcomings.”—Yara El-Ghadban, author of I Am Ariel Sharon

      “Steven Heighton’s extraordinary book is driven by two inseparable desires: to learn, and to help. First is the writerly needing to know exactly how people manage in a particular time and place. Best go there and find out. Being there you may help. Learning, you will help better. And writing about it later, about the whole mix of those suffering and those seeking to alleviate that suffering, continues the learning because making sentences is a continued thinking, a trying to make sense. What this book teaches in its writing and in its publication is that mutual aid is the condition of our survival.”—David Constantine, author of In Another Country

      “Heighton’s searing memoir of embedding among the volunteers … is far more than a traveler’s tale … This is the kind of book you won’t forget.”Kirkus

      Reaching Mithymna, is an eloquent depiction of refugees, volunteers and a seemingly endless crisis.” Maclean's

      "A meticulous assemblage of vignettes and character sketches in the hands of a masterful storyteller who wears his values on his page."—Broken Pencil

      "Heighton’s harrowing and moving book about his time in Greece, with its rich array of characters and finely expressed understanding of the pain of exile, wrenches our gaze back to the refugees and refuses to let go."—Brian Bethune

      "As Heighton, by his impromptu arrival, experiences a world crisis unfolding far from his protected home life, so do we through his refreshing style and humble tone."—The Longest Chapter

      Praise for Steven Heighton

      “[A] brilliant storyteller … [His] exquisite, powerful meditations on who we are place Heighton among the great Canadian writers … His focus is contemporary, but he is a practitioner of the old school, a writer for those who love to read widely and deeply.”—Donna Bailey Nurse, Literary Review of Canada

      “In scintillating prose and with masterly control of his plot and characters, poet and novelist Heighton (Afterlands) weaves a spellbinding tale of love, loyalty, and betrayal. This timely (press reports indicate that reunification talks between Greek and Turkish Cypriot leaders are advancing) novel is highly recommended to all readers.”—Edward B. Cone, Library Journal (starred review)

      “As this fascinating ... well-plotted novel draws to a tense conclusion, Heighton skillfully knits together the difficult history and politics of the region, military machinations, and the nuanced inner lives and relationships of Elias and the villagers.”—Publishers Weekly

      “[An] elegantly crafted tale of a young poet and boxer who fights his way out of the backwoods of Canada, drunk on Kerouac and the unbounded promise of his future. Heighton chronicles [his characters'] growth with impressive restraint and sensitivity… [and] ably captures the emotional costs of a young man's dream.”—Washington Post

      “Vivid and powerfully drawn ... The Shadow Boxer is an energetic, fluent and interesting novel by a writer who has already shown himself to be gifted, capable of exploring and experimenting with language.” —Times Literary Supplement

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    Forgotten Work Jason Guriel Canada
    9781771963824 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:September 29, 2020
    $19.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.42 in | 165 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A love story about fandom, an ode to music snobs, and a time-tripping work of speculative fiction—in verse.

      In the year 2063, on the edge of the Crater formerly known as Montréal, a middle-aged man and his ex’s daughter search for a cult hero: the leader of a short-lived band named after a forgotten work of poetry and known to fans through a forgotten work of music criticism. In this exuberantly plotted verse novel, Guriel follows an obsessive cult-following through the twenty-first century. Some things change (there’s metamorphic smart print for music mags; the Web is called the “Zuck”). Some things don’t (poetry readings are still, mostly, terrible). But the characters, including a robot butler who stands with Ishiguro’s Stevens as one of the great literary domestics, are unforgettable.

      Splicing William Gibson with Roberto Bolaño, Pale Fire with Thomas Pynchon, Forgotten Work is a time-tripping work of speculative fiction. It’s a love story about fandom, an ode to music snobs, a satire on the human need to value the possible over the actual—and a verse novel of Nabokovian virtuosity.

      Bio

      Jason Guriel is the author of several collections of poems and a book of essays. His writing has appeared in Slate, The Atlantic, and other magazines. He lives in Toronto.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Forgotten Work

      "A futuristic dystopian rock novel in rhymed couplets, this rollicking book is as unlikely, audacious and ingenious as the premise suggests."—New York Times

      "A wondrous novel."—Ron Charles, Washington Post

      "This is no novel for fans of 20th-century CanLit’s plodding linear plots of settling the land and alcoholism. This one is for the boundary pushers and bohos, jazz snobs with their fanatical attention to minutiae that allows them to feel superior to those who do not know about what Bukowski calls 'the thing!'"—Quill & Quire

      "Forgotten Work’s biggest pyrotechnic is its form ... Guriel shifts comfortably between his formal constraint and the more prosaic needs of the narrative. Guriel’s formal choice reflects his characters’ obsessions with the past... Through this playful postmodern fictionalizing, Guriel signals the way that our approaches to past works and traditions form flags to rally around."—Canadian Literature

      "Here's a verse-novel that is a sustained, dazzlingly crafted, adventure into the 21st century."—Molly Peacock, author of The Analyst

      “What do you get when you throw John Shade, Nick Drake, Don Juan, Sarah Records, and Philip K. Dick into a rhymed couplet machine? Equal parts memory and forgetting, detritus and elegy, imagination and fancy, Forgotten Work could be the most singular novel-in-verse since Vikram Seth’s The Golden Gate. Thanks to Jason Guriel’s dexterity in metaphor-making, I found myself stopping and rereading every five lines or so, to affirm my surprise and delight.”—Stephen Metcalf

      “This book has no business being as good as it is. Heroic couplets in the twenty-first century? It’s not a promising idea, but Forgotten Work is intelligent, fluent, funny, and wholly original. I can’t believe it exists.”—Christian Wiman

      "This may be the first rock 'n’ roll novel written in iambic pentameter ... strange and affectionate, like Almost Famous penned by Shakespeare. A love letter to music in all its myriad iterations."—Kirkus Reviews

      "A feast of allusions—musical, literary, and cinematic—is the book’s most entertaining aspect, and it speaks to the powerful currents flowing between artists and artworks across disciplines, as well as to the effect of art on its consumers ... Guriel’s bountiful celebration of connections between art finds an inspiring, infectious groove."—Publishers Weekly

      Praise for Jason Guriel

      “What sets Guriel apart is the inescapable tone of his writing. It’s obvious from reading him: he is having fun … The best of his verse is infused with wit, irony, and the ghosts of his influences.”—Quill & Quire

      “Guriel is the consummate stylist, and every poem in Satisfying Clicking Sound has plenty of flourish.”—Maisonneuve

      "Like the bumblebee that flies even though it shouldn’t be able to, Forgotten Work’s amalgam of epic poem, sci-fi novel, and deep dive into rock-fandom gets improbably airborne, a feat attributable not only to its author’s large and multifaceted talent, but also to his winning infatuation with the diverse realms his story inhabits."—Literary Matters

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Stoop City Kristyn Dunnion Canada
    9781771963862 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:September 22, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.68 in | 280 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      A sea witch, a bossy Virgin Mary, and a lesbian widow’s wife—in ghost form—walk into a short story collection ...

      From a homeless teen abandoned by his scam-artist boyfriend and a woman who finds herself renegotiating the terms of her relationship with her lover’s ghost, to the lovelorn Mary Louise, who struggles with butch bachelorhood, and a tribute to Grimm’s “The Golden Goose” rendered as a jazz dance spectacle, Kristyn Dunnion’s freewheeling collection goes wherever there’s a story to tell—and then, out of whispers and shouts, echoes and snippets, gritty realism and speculative fiction, illuminates the delicate strands that hold us all together.

      Bio

      Kristyn Dunnion grew up in Essex County, the southernmost tip of Canada, and now lives in Toronto. She is the author of six books, including Tarry This Night and The Dirt Chronicles, a Lambda Literary Award finalist. Her short fiction is widely published, most recently in Best Canadian Stories 2020, Foglifter, Orca: A Literary Journal, and Toronto 2033. Dunnion works supporting homeless adults with serious mental illness, and has been a healthy food advocate for marginalized communities in Davenport-Perth, where she resides.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Stoop City

      "What an assured and attractively variegated collection of stories. Set in Toronto and small-town southern Ontario, Kristyn Dunnion's 13 short pieces are marvellous feats of pacing and styling bolstered by vibrant characterization and enviable turns of phrase."Quill & Quire (starred review)

      “No one writes like Kristyn Dunnion, not even those of us who really, really want to. These are stories that live under your skin and force new colours into the spectrum, that rip open and fold inward at the same time. You read them and wonder about the talent that allowed them to be told. Just how many lives has Dunnion lived exactly, to be able to write like this? Because you believe every word and walk beside every character. I am a long-time fan of Kristyn's work and now I think I may be head-over-heels in love.”—Cherie Dimaline, Kirkus Prize-winning author of The Marrow Thieves

      “Like her feral, tormented citizens, Dunnion swaps registers, altitudes, myths, and meanings with heartbroken elan. These stories are merciful and naked; these sentences never miss.”—Paige Cooper, Scotiabank Giller Prize-nominated author of Zolitude

      Stoop City is a tender snarl of an album, a glorious collection of wreckage and beauty and insight. Dunnion's care shines through each carefully crafted page.”—Casey Plett, Amazon.ca First Novel Award-winning author of Little Fish

      “Subtle satire and fantastical elements bring levity and subtext to Canadian author Dunnion’s short fiction … Dunnion’s wistful vignettes argue persuasively that the one affliction from which all human beings suffer—regardless of age, gender, sexual orientation, or socio-economic status—is loneliness. Dunnion’s second collection comprises a diverse slate of loosely linked stories with a cohesive message: Everybody hurts.”Kirkus Reviews

      "The heroines in Dunnion’s defiant collection offer refreshingly blunt observations about the world around them, in settings alternating between the gritty and the fantastical."Publishers Weekly

      “Kristyn Dunnion is a sharply observant chronicler of the marginal urban experience. In these tightly written stories, nobody gets a break. Even her well-adjusted characters are stretched to the limit by challenging circumstances. What comes through loud and clear though is the author’s empathy for people whose lives are spinning out of control through no fault of their own.”—The Miramichi Reader

      “To read this collection is to witness stories of human connection told in a myriad of ways, from the absence-of to a yearning-for … Dunnion builds a community of diverse, vivid lives sewn into a patchwork quilt … The author’s strength lies in her dynamic characters: in creating a multitude of existences, and allowing us to share in those moments. And what we see is not the end. The residents of Stoop City live beyond the page.”—Prism International

      “Kristyn Dunnion masters the speculative, illuminating elements of the strange to create something that's somehow all the more gritty and real. Stoop City is a total reimagining of community, showing us that despite how very different we are, it is the delicate human threads within each of our own unique stories that binds us together.”—All Lit Up

      Praise for Kristyn Dunnion

      The Dirt Chronicles is tough and tenderhearted, a beautifully-written literary ode to outlaw culture. Kristyn Dunnion's writing is fierce and funny, a truly original book of stories I hope everyone will read.”—Zoe Whittall

      “Kristyn Dunnion is an utterly glorious writer. The gothic lyricism of Tarry This Night not only secures her a place among the rising stars of genre-bridging literary fiction, it is a declarative staking-out of narrative territory that is uniquely hers. A superb, elegant read.”—Michael Rowe

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Watching the Devil Dance How a Spree Killer Slipped Through the Cracks of the Criminal Justice System William Toffan Canada
    9781771963251 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Criminals & Outlaws Publication Date:November 10, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.68 in | 200 gr | 200 pages Carton Quantity:50 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The unbelievable true story of North America’s first known spree killer, written by a veteran of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

      In June 1966, Matthew Charles Lamb took his uncle’s shotgun and wandered down Ford Blvd in Windsor, Ontario. At the end of the bloody night, two teenagers lay dead, with multiple others injured after an unprovoked shooting spree. In his investigation into Lamb’s story, William Toffan pieces together the troubled childhood and the history of violence that culminated in the young man’s dubious distinction as Canada’s first known spree killer—at which point the story becomes, the author writes “too strange for fiction.” Traveling from the border city streets, to the courtroom, to the Oak Ridge rehabilitation center, and finally the Rhodesian army, Watching the Devil Dance is both a thrilling narrative about an unbelievable true crime and an insightful analysis of the 1960s criminal justice system.


      Bio

      A retired history teacher and veteran of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, William Toffan lives in Windsor, Ontario, with his wife, Laura, and children Lauren, Heidi, Oksana, and Heather. Watching the Devil Dance is his first book.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Watching the Devil Dance

      "A vital addition to the Canadian true crime canon. Packed with agonizing moment after agonizing moment, Watching the Devil Dance takes you from the bloodied sidewalks to the moan-filled hallways of Oak Ridge and places the Matthew Lamb case at the centre of a turning point in legal history, offering a peek into Canadian history rarely examined and highlighting the historic failings of the criminal justice system in our country. This is not just a regional crime story. It is a tragedy with national implications."—Vanessa Brown, author of The Forest City Killer: A Serial Murderer, A Cold-Case Sleuth, and a Search for Justice

      “An unusual tale marked by fascinating elements that are unique to the era in which his crimes occurred. [Toffan’s] book offers detailed insight into a type of criminal that would later become more prevalent: the mass murderer.” —Toronto Star

      “An impressive debut ... By any yardstick, this is an excellent true-crime book. Toffan develops context and provides understanding, especially of the law. He also renders a gripping account of the murders, without ever sensationalizing the violence he recounts.”Winnipeg Free Press

      “Fascinating, measured, and compulsively readable, Watching the Devil Dance is essential true crime reading and a chilling indictment of the failings of the justice system.” —Open Book

      “With spectacular insight Toffan details the horrible tragedy of Lamb’s shooting spree, submerging the reader in that era and putting them right in the middle of the story. Toffan also gives us a very generous amount of background on Lamb which is essential in understanding the mind of a killer ... This is a must read for crime story lovers.”—The Horror Report

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    9781771963343 Hardcover HISTORY / Canada Publication Date:November 10, 2020
    $44.95 CAD 9 x 10.88 x 1.09 in | 2267 gr Carton Quantity:7 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The much-anticipated follow-up to From the Vault, Volume 1 draws on local archives to bring historic London, Ontario, to life.

      Welcome to 1950 in London, Ontario. The post-war boom is in full swing, fueled by jobs, babies, and the modern consumer. New buildings dot the landscape, marking the advent of suburbia and rise of the shopping mall. When the 401 cuts through town, London finds itself on the cultural map, bringing famous acts to town. Taken by the spirit of protest, Londoners hit the streets to make their voices heard. Is this the heyday of the Forest City?

      From the Vault, Volume II: 1950 to 1975 explores what were among the most important and exciting years of London’s history. From the opening of Wellington Square Mall to a Royal Visit, the demolition of Hotel London to anti-Vietnam protests, the book illustrates the era by featuring over 1,250 iconic images from the archives of the London Free Press, held at Western Archives.

      As London’s paper of record for 170 years, the London Free Press remains the region’s greatest source of historical photography and eyewitness testimony. Like its predecessor, the best-selling From the Vault, this book sets a new standard for Canadian excellence in regional history. Documenting landmark events, timeless memories, and unforgettable characters, it's a must-have for lovers of history.


      Bio

      Jennifer Grainger has a Master of Arts in Archaeology from the University of London, UK, and a Master of Library and Information Science from Western University, London, Ontario. She is the Past President of the London & Middlesex Historical Society and Vice President of the London branch of the Architectural Conservancy of Ontario. Author of Vanished Villages of Middlesex and Vanished Villages of Elgin (Dundurn Press), she also edited Honouring Our Roots: Delaware and Westminster Townships. Jennifer's most recent work is Early London 1826 - 1914, A Photographic History from the Orr Collection (Biblioasis), published in 2016.

      Marketing & Promotion
        • The follow-up to London Free Press: From the Vault Vol 1, which has sold over 5000 copies since its release in November 2017.

  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Best Canadian Essays 2020 Sarmishta Subramanian Canada
    9781771963664 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Canadian Publication Date:October 20, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.68 in | 306 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      2020 editor Sarmishta Subramanian draws on her extensive editorial career to select the best of Canadian nonfiction.

      The twelfth installment of Canada's annual volume of essays showcases diverse nonfiction writing from across the country. Culled from leading Canadian magazines and journals by acclaimed guest editor Sarmishta Subramanian, Best Canadian Essays 2020 contains award-winning and award-nominated nonfiction articles that are topical and engaging and have their finger on the pulse of our contemporary psyches.

      Bio

      Sarmishta Subramanian has been an editor at Saturday Night, The Walrus, National Post, Chatelaine, the Toronto Star, and Maclean’s, where she remains an editor-at-large. She has also produced radio documentaries for CBC’s The Sunday Edition. She was the editor in chief of the Literary Review of Canada from 2016 to 2018.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Best Canadian Essays 2020

      "The kind of selection one can slide into like a pool of water, immersive, encompassing, edging deeper into places where your feet leave the ground and you’re buoyed along on eddying currents of words."—Tyee

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Best Canadian Poetry 2020 Marilyn Dumont Canada, Anita Lahey Canada, Amanda Jernigan Canada
    9781771963640 Paperback POETRY / Anthologies Publication Date:October 20, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.56 in | 220 gr | 184 pages Carton Quantity:72 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      The annual installment of the poetry anthology Quill & Quire calls "must-have."

      Guest editor Marilyn Dumont, author of the widely acclaimed collection A Really Good Brown Girl, brings a passionate ear for rhythm, an eye for narrative compression, an appetite for vital subject matter, and an affinity for warmth and wit to Best Canadian Poetry 2020. The fifty poignantly independent poems gathered here explore themes of emergence, defiance, ferocious anger, gratitude, and survival. They are alive with acoustic energy, precise in their language, and moving in their use of the personal to explore an increasingly tumultuous world.

      Featuring work by: Kazim Ali • Di Brandt • Billy-Ray Belcourt • Ivan Coyote • Louise Bernice Halfe • Tanis MacDonald • Timiro Mohamed • Alycia Pirmohamed • Rebecca Salazar • Robyn Sarah • John Elizabeth Stintzi • Sanna Wani • Adele Wiseman—and many more. 

      Bio

      Marilyn Dumont is a Canadian poet of Cree/Métis descent whose poetry has won provincial and national awards. She has been the writer-in-residence at five Canadian universities and the Edmonton Public Library as well as an advisor in the Aboriginal Emerging Writers Program at the Banff Centre. She teaches sessional creative writing for Athabasca University and Native studies and English for the University of Alberta, and currently lives in Edmonton.

      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Best Canadian Poetry 2020

      “A radical and wholly revelatory re-imagining of the country’s poetry canon ... The anthology compiled by Dumont is undeniably political and deeply philosophical, but never at the expense of prosody ... Best Canadian Poetry 2020 is an outstanding record of diverse voices and lived experiences reflected in Canadian poetry, and it is one that I will undoubtedly return to in the years to come.”—Prairie Fire

      Praise for the Best Canadian Poetry Series

      “[These] books are must-haves for libraries, schools, and intellectually well-intentioned bedside nightstands across the country.”—Quill & Quire

      “The wide range of writers, forms and themes represented here make it a great jumping-off point for readers who might be interested in Canadian poetry but are unsure about where to start.”—Globe and Mail

      “Buy it, or borrow it, but do read it.”—Arc Poetry Magazine

      “A magnet, I think, for the many people who would like to know contemporary poetry.”—A.F. Moritz, Griffin Poetry Prize winner

      “An eclectic and diverse collection of Canadian poetry . . . a wonderful addition to anyone’s bookshelf.”—Toronto Quarterly

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    9781771963626 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Canadian Publication Date:October 20, 2020
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.68 in | 306 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:52 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description
      Giller-nominated editor Paige Cooper's 2020 selection includes work by Lynn Coady, Casey Plett, Naben Ruthnum, Thea Lim, and other standouts of Canadian short fiction.

      Now in its fiftieth year, Best Canadian Stories has long championed the short story form and highlighted the work of many writers who have gone on to shape the Canadian literary canon. Margaret Atwood, Clark Blaise, Tamas Dobozy, Mavis Gallant, Douglas Glover, Norman Levine, Rohinton Mistry, Alice Munro, Leon Rooke, Diane Schoemperlen, Kathleen Winter, and many others have appeared in its pages over the decades, making Best Canadian Stories the go-to source for what’s new in Canadian fiction writing for close to five decades. Selected by guest editor Paige Cooper, the 2020 edition draws together both newer and established writers to shape an engaging and luminous mosaic of writing in this country today—a continuation of not only a series, but a legacy in Canadian letters.

      Featuring work by: Maxime Raymond Bock • Lynn Coady • Kristyn Dunnion • Omar El Akkad • Camilla Grudova • Conor Kerr • Alex Leslie • Thea Lim • Madeleine Maillet • Cassidy McFadzean • Michael Melgaard • Jeff Noh • Casey Plett • Eden Robinson • Naben Ruthnum • Pablo Strauss • Souvankham Thammavongsa


       


       



      Bio

      Paige Cooper is an author and short story writer from Montreal. Her stories have appeared in The Fiddlehead, Gulf Coast Online, Michigan Quarterly Review, CAROUSEL, Minola Review, and The New Quarterly, and have been anthologized in The Journey Prize Stories and Best Canadian Stories. She received the QWF Concordia University First Book Prize in 2018 for her debut collection Zolitude.


      Marketing & Promotion
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Best Canadian Stories 2020

      “The legacy for Canadian literature in the Best Canadian Stories series can’t be overstated. For years the collection has been the place to discover Canadian writers, and the most recent edition is no different ... [Paige Cooper’s] choices are impressive. Even if a particular story isn’t to one’s taste, you can still admire the skill. Realism abuts surrealism, comic insight sits gladly with tragedy. The comfort of one world is shattered by the disquiet of another ... This is a great collection waiting to be experienced.”Winnipeg Free Press

      Praise for Best Canadian Stories

      “A splendid collection.”
      Quill & Quire

      Best Canadian Stories ... combines both emerging and established voices for a fascinating glimpse at the most exciting short fiction coming out of this country.”—Open Book

      Praise for Paige Cooper

      “Cooper has a keen eye for the quirks of human behavior.” —Publishers Weekly

      “The consensus newcomer of the year.”—Montreal Gazette

      "Cooper appears almost frighteningly assured in her approach and execution. The author wields language like a finely tuned instrument.” —Quill & Quire Book of the Year citation

Select a Market


Forgotten Password

Please enter your email address and click submit. An email with instructions on resetting your password will be sent to you.

Forgotten Password

An email has been sent out with instructions for resetting your password.