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Biblioasis Spring 2022

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  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Poguemahone Patrick McCabe
    9781771964739 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:May 03, 2022
    $27.95 CAD 5.6 x 8.5 x 1.3 in | 700 gr | 612 pages Carton Quantity:20 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A swirling, psychedelic, bleakly funny fugue by the Booker-shortlisted author of The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto.

      Una Fogarty, suffering from dementia in a seaside nursing home, would be all alone without her brother Dan, whose epic free-verse monologue tells their family story. Exile from Ireland and immigrant life in England. Their mother’s trials as a call girl. Young Una’s search for love in a seemingly haunted hippie squat, and the two-timing Scottish stoner poet she’ll never get over. Now she sits outside in the sun as her memories unspool from Dan’s mouth and his own role in the tale grows ever stranger— and more sinister.

      A swirling, psychedelic, bleakly funny fugue, Patrick McCabe’s epic reinvention of the verse novel combines Modernist fragmentation and Beat spontaneity with Irish folklore, then douses it in whiskey and sets it on fire. Drinking song and punk libretto, ancient as myth and wholly original, Poguemahone is the devastating telling of one family’s history—and the forces, seen and unseen, that make their fate.

      Bio

      Patrick McCabe was born in 1955 in Clones, Country Monaghan. He was a teacher and then he was not, having become a full-time writer. He is the author of The Butcher Boy, which won the Irish Times Irish Literature Prize for Fiction; The Dead School; Breakfast on Pluto and others. The Butcher Boy and Breakfast on Pluto were both shortlisted for the Booker Prize and adapted into feature films by Neil Jordan. Winterwood was named the 2007 Hughes & Hughes/Irish Independent Irish Novel of the Year. His next novel is a chillingly amusing chronicle of political and cultural life in 60s and 70s Dublin, called Watertown.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 10,000
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies at Winter Institute
        • IndieNext campaign
        • North American TV & radio campaign=/li>
        • National print campaign
        • Online and social media campaign. Giveaways through Edelweiss, Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram.
        • E-book marketing plans: available same date as print edition, e-book ISBN included on press materials and websites and promoted via social media
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Poguemahone

      "Poguemahone is like a high dive: The toughest part of reading it might be convincing your feet to leave the board. Once you’ve done that, gravity does the rest."—John Williams, New York Times

      "Poguemahone [is] an immense, audacious novel [...] a volcanic spray of vernacular, Gaelic-infused memory fragments and character sketches."—Sam Sacks, The Wall Street Journal

      "McCabe draws the reader into a rambling web replete with Gaelic folklore, IRA agitation, and a soundtrack of glam and progressive rock. Lively and ambitious in form, this admirably extends the range of McCabe’s career-long examination of familial and childhood trauma."—Publishers Weekly

      “The vernacular, drunken verse format may be daunting at first, but after a few pages the narrative develops a hypnotic rhythm, as if one is sitting on a barstool listening to the narrator unspool his story over a pint (or three). At this point, the reader has merely to hang on and enjoy the ride. A moving saga of youth, age, and memory—by turns achingly poetic, knowingly philosophical, and bitterly funny.”—Kirkus Reviews

      "McCabe is attempting something different from the finely tuned gothic chamber music of his earlier work: he’s aiming for a kind of polyphony [...] the effect is one of alienation—not that the book isn’t a tremendous pleasure to read, albeit at times slightly uncomfortable. ‘Our national epic has yet to be written,’ all the young literary dudes opine in Ulysses. Poguemahone isn’t ‘about’ Ireland (though it is profoundly ‘about’ the Irish diaspora). But it is a particularly modern kind of epic"—Keith Miller, Literary Review

      "Poguemahone is a stunning novel, one of those exceedingly rare books that deserve to be described as a masterpiece."—Ian Mond, Locus

      "Poguemahone is, in content and execution, frequently astonishing, and galloping through a very long novel at the rate of three pages per minute is an exhilarating sensory experience. [...] In its haunting strangeness and blazing originality, [Poguemahone] deserves far more than a cult following."—David Collard, Times Literary Supplement

      "Poguemahone is a shape-shifting epic of the Irish in England, steeped in music and folklore, crammed with characters, both real and imagined, on a scale McCabe has never attempted before. Indeed, among his 14 novels and two Booker Prize nominations, this stands out as risky, experimental work by an artist reluctant to rest on his laurels. Modernist and eager to push the boundaries of his own art and the art form of the novel, here is a novelist and novel to celebrate in all their ribald, audacious, outrageous, and compelling brilliance."—Paul Perry, The Independent (Ireland)

      "If you’re looking for this century’s Ulysses, look no further than Patrick McCabe’s Poguemahone."—The Guardian

      "You might think, on first sight, that Poguemahone was following in the wake of Finnegan in its attempt to be enormously long, very dense and quite inaccessible. But it is not, at all. You can slip into it like a blunt knife through butter."—Irish Examiner

      "The reader hears the book as something spoken aloud, or whispered, or snarled, or insinuated or spat into his ear. The voice is an insistent companion who, having got hold of an elbow, has no plans to stop until his hour is exhausted or the auditor collapses under the weight of memory, bile, repetition and implication."—The Telegraph

      "No one who read McCabe’s 1992 novel The Butcher Boy could forget its chilling depiction of a troubled schoolboy in 1960s Ireland. His latest, a dizzying verse novel 600 pages long, is equally likely to haunt the mind. It has so many layers that we’re never sure where we are ... with a skinpricking ambience that’s both gritty and ethereal."—The Daily Mail

      "McCabe may be right when he claims that Poguemahone is his best book: it is startlingly original, moving, funny, frightening and beautiful."Ian Duhig, The Guardian

      "The book—a hefty 600 pages—is written in verse form. And, for those of you put off by the very idea, don’t be. It is by turns energetic, hilarious, tragic and terrifying, and easy to follow once you fall into the beat of it—'the beat of a bodhran, which is the beat of Irish history,' says McCabe."—Emily Hourican, The Independent (Ireland)

      "In the pantheon of storied Irish writers—Joyce in Dublin, Yeats on the west coast—McCabe has a special place as the conjuror of the small-town middle. [...] Once you get tuned to McCabe’s brilliant playful wavelength, after a couple or three pages, you find yourself at home in Aunty Nano’s famous late-night club [...] and spending too much time at the 'premier crash pad in all of north London', paradiso or inferno, depending on your politics."—Tim Adams, The Guardian

      "Poguemahone is a blistering, brilliant ballad of mad tales from rural Ireland to London Town, and all you might meet along your way. The characters are electric, the narrative fuelled with a brilliant frenetic energy—I loved this great song. McCabe is truly original."—Elaine Feeney, author of As You Were

      "A tremendous pitch-black multi-layered epic. This exhilarating ride of madness, hauntings, lost weekends, and fractured memory is a lyrical poem, novel, ballad, and drama all in one ... one of the most original literary works of recent times. I bloody loved it."—Adelle Stripe, author of Black Teeth and a Brilliant Smile

      "Pitched—deliriously—between high modernism and folk magic, between gorgeous free-verse and hilarious Irish vernacular, Poguemahone is a stunning achievement ... profoundly affecting"—David Keenan

      Praise for Patrick McCabe

      “McCabe [is] as skilled and significant a novelist as Ireland has produced in decades.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

      “Lyrical and disturbing, horrific and hilarious.”—New York Times

      “[McCabe is] one of the most brilliant writers ever to come out of Ireland.”—San Francisco Chronicle

      Breakfast on Pluto may be the most successful book yet to be born out of the violence [in Northern Ireland] … Stunning originality.”—New York Times Book Review

      “McCabe certainly has a talent for creating memorable characters who are worth spending some time with, warts and all.”—Library Journal

      “McCabe slowly transforms his unreliable narrator from a campy Austin Powers-like figure to a sick creep with a violent streak. [A] mesmerizing but unsettling read.”?Booklist

      “A spellbinding story of betrayal and broken dreams narrated to a wonderfully menacing effect … the sheer force of his language … positively thrums with life.”—Los Angeles Times

      The Dead School makes compelling literature … The writing is seamless, the effect shocking: Imagine Apocalypse Now cheerfully narrated by Jimmy Stewart.”—The Seattle Times

      “Reading fiction will never be the same again.”—Roddy Doyle, author of Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha

      “A dark genius of incongruity and the grotesque.”—Hermione Lee, author of Tom Stoppard: A Life

      “A savage and unfettered imagination.”—Erica Wagner, author of Seizure

      “A sustained achievement of often dazzling brilliance.”—Irvine Welsh, author of Trainspotting

      “Stark, fierce, and wonderful.”—Claire Kilroy, author of The Devil I Know

      “Gloriously deranged, wired to the moon, truly inspired.”—Kevin Barry, author of City of Bohane

      “Like reading sections of Ulysses.”—Neil Jordan

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    Try Not to Be Strange The Curious History of the Kingdom of Redonda Michael Hingston Canada
    9781771964159 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Literary Figures Publication Date:September 13, 2022
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 in | 440 gr | 302 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      On his fifteenth birthday, in the summer of 1880, future science-fiction writer M.P. Shiel sailed with his father and the local bishop from their home in the Caribbean out to the nearby island of Redonda—where, with pomp and circumstance, he was declared the island’s king. A few years later, when Shiel set sail for a new life in London, his father gave him some advice: Try not to be strange. It was almost as if the elder Shiel knew what was coming.

      Try Not to Be Strange: The Curious History of the Kingdom of Redonda tells, for the first time, the complete history of Redonda’s transformation from an uninhabited, guano-encrusted island into a fantastical and international kingdom of writers. With a cast of characters including forgotten sci-fi novelists, alcoholic poets, vegetarian publishers, Nobel Prize frontrunners, and the bartenders who kept them all lubricated while angling for the throne themselves, Michael Hingston details the friendships, feuds, and fantasies that fueled the creation of one of the oddest and most enduring micronations ever dreamt into being. Part literary history, part travelogue, part quest narrative, this cautionary tale about what happens when bibliomania escapes the shelves and stacks is as charming as it is peculiar—and blurs the line between reality and fantasy so thoroughly that it may never be entirely restored.

      Bio
      Michael Hingston is a writer and publisher in Edmonton, Alberta. He is the author of the books Let’s Go Exploring and The Dilettantes, as well as the co-author of Harnarayan Singh’s memoir One Game at a Time. Hingston’s writing has appeared in Wired, National Geographic, The Atlantic, and the Washington Post. He is also one of the co-founders of Hingston & Olsen Publishing, makers of the Short Story Advent Calendar and other literary experiments.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Edelweiss digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • E-book available at same time as print edition
        • Virtual launch and festival appearances
        • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Try Not to Be Strange

      "That spirit, the tongue-in-cheek mock seriousness of the whole endeavour, and the playfulness of its participants, is a keen factor in Try Not to Be Strange. The book is a delightful reading experience, utterly unexpected and unlike anything you are likely to read this year."—Toronto Star

      "Try Not to Be Strange is a passionate and skillfully written exploration of an extraordinary world and those who search for such places to get to the heart of what stories really mean. Hingston’s thirst for deeper knowledge is palpable, and it illuminates what the kingdom might really stand for."—Quill & Quire

      "Full of colorful personalities, exotic locales, and unexpected twists, this is a jaunty historical footnote."Publishers Weekly

      Praise for Michael Hingston

      "[Hingston] does it all with a delicious sense of humour."Quill & Quire (starred review)

      "Wise and love-driven ... full of observations, analysis, and well-researched history."Edmonton Journal

      “A fresh take on the campus novel, Michael Hingston’s debut is a droll, incisive dissection of the terrible, terribly exciting years known as post-adolescence.”—Patrick deWitt, author of The Sisters Brothers

      "This book captures the joy and excitement at first discovering Calvin and Hobbes, and the wistful sadness that it is no more."—Patton Oswalt

      "The Dilettantes is a whip-smart and very funny literary portrait of the post-ironic generation. Don't miss this."—Zoe Whittall, author of The Best Kind of People

      "His insights are rich and concise, but he never commandeers the work, as is the habit with writing about pop culture. As a critic, Hingston uses light touches of salt to bring out the flavours already in the work... A fine companion to a comic about a kid without much interest in companionship."—Bookshelf News

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    9781771963541 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:August 02, 2022
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 1 in | 280 gr | 200 pages Carton Quantity:48 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the Atwood Gibson Writers' Trust Fiction Prize

      Homage to Jean Genet’s antihero and a brilliant reimagining of the ancient form of tragedy, Querelle of Roberval, winner of the Marquis de Sade Prize, is a wildly imaginative story of justice, passion, and murderous revenge.

      As a millworkers’ strike in the northern lumber town of Roberval drags on, tensions start to escalate between the workers—but when a lockout renews their solidarity, they rally around the mysterious and magnetic influence of Querelle, a dashing newcomer from Montreal. Strapping and unabashed, likeable but callow, by day he walks the picket lines and at night moves like a mythic Adonis through the ranks of young men who flock to his apartment for sex. As the dispute hardens and both sides refuse to yield, sand stalls the gears of the economic machine and the tinderbox of class struggle and entitlement ignites in a firestorm of passions carnal and violent. Trenchant social drama, a tribute to Jean Genet’s antihero, and a brilliant reimagining of the ancient form of tragedy, Querelle of Roberval, winner of France’s Marquis de Sade Prize, is a wildly imaginative story of justice, passion, and murderous revenge.

      Bio
      Born in 1992, Kevin Lambert grew up in Chicoutimi, Quebec. He earned a master’s degree in creative writing at the Université de Montréal. His widely acclaimed first novel, You Will Love What You Have Killed, was a finalist for Quebec’s Booksellers’ Prize. His second novel, Querelle of Roberval, won France’s Marquis de Sade Prize, and was a finalist for the prestigious Prix Médicis and the literary prize of the Paris newspaper Le Monde. In Canada, Querelle of Roberval won the Prix Ringuet of the Quebec Academy of Arts and Letters, was a finalist for the Grand Prix du Livre de Montréal and won or was a finalist for six other literary prizes. Kevin Lambert lives in Montreal.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

      • Print run: 5,000
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • North American TV & radio campaign
      • National print campaign
      • Online and social media campaign. Giveaways through Edelweiss, Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram.
      • Outreach to translation media and booksellers.
      • Outreach to queer-interest media and booksellers.
      • E-book available same date as print edition, e-book ISBN included on press materials and websites and promoted via social media
      • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Marquis de Sade Prize 2019, Winner
      Prix Médicis 2021, Nominated
      Prix Ringuet 2019, Winner
      Reviews

      Praise for Querelle of Roberval

      "It has finally arrived: the erotic Québécois novel about labor conflict that we’ve all been waiting for ... The book is written in an icy style. Try to find a surplus adjective—I dare you. It is not for the squeamish but (or rather, and) is easily one of the best novels I’ve read this year."—Molly Young, New York Times

      “Kevin Lambert’s fearless novel is a profane, funny, bleak, touching, playful, and outrageous satire of sexual politics, labour, and capitalism. In ecstatic and cutting prose, it gleefully illuminates both the broad socio-political tensions of life in a Quebec company town and the intimate details of sex, lust, loneliness, and gay relationships in such a place. Like its central character, the book is brash, beautiful, quasi-mythic, and tragic. Most improbably, for all its daring and provocation, Querelle of Roberval is lyrically, even tenderly written.”—Judge's citation for the 2022 Atwood Gibson Writers' Trust Fiction Prize

      "Lambert’s excavation into the depths of desire and provocation is as thrilling as it is disturbing, as beautiful as it is revolting. This is a difficult balance to manage, yet it may well be the key to his success."—Literary Review of Canada

      "Febrile, postmodern to the bone and unexpectedly affecting, the novel is a startling, mile-a-minute performance."—Toronto Star

      "As this off-putting yet attractively written novel explores both meanings of the word 'union,' sex and domination are presented as conjoined compulsions that can lead to brutal forms of ecstasy."—Sam Sacks, The Wall Street Journal

      "A vibrant storm of gossip and myth ... The language of the novel is rich and evocative, a compliment to both Lambert’s and Winkler’s instincts for poetry. Lambert displays his linguistic skill equally in images of the erotic and the abject, in a prose that entices and disturbs at the same time."—Montreal Review of Books

      "An inherently fascinating and memorable read from first page to last."—Midwest Book Review

      "This English translation will certainly garner the author an expanded fanbase, particularly those who may have missed out on his smashing debut You Will Love What You Have Killed ... Definitely not for the easily offended, only fans of the kind of bizarre, perverse, and controversially provocative fiction that put writers like Dennis Cooper on the literary map will enjoy discovering Lambert's graphic yet lyrical language style, unfettered storytelling bravado, and, of course, his intense, daring vision."—The Bay Area Reporter

      "Kevin Lambert’s novel Querelle of Roberval is nothing short of sensational."—The Link

      "Structured as a reimagining of Greek tragedy, Querelle of Roberval is a book that reads like a swift, vivid dream. The language is direct and cuts straight to the bone, while dealing with passions both personal and professional. The central conflict of the novel takes place around a labor strike at the local lumber mill, and the magnetic presence of newcomer and sexual renegade, Querelle, who alternately intrigues and infuriates the community. Brutal and beautiful by turns, this novel will grip readers from the first sentence all the way to its shocking conclusion."—David Vogel, Buzzfeed

      “The translation by Donald Winkler, who was also responsible for the previous novel, is of the highest quality and once again stands out for its richness and respect of local color ... Provocative and deliciously irreverent, the novel can be savored with an almost satisfying pleasure, commensurate with the disproportion of the conflicts and questionings that agitate it."—Benoit Migneault, Fugues

      “The most savage literary protest of this season … This 27-year-old author has already established his voice through an unusual gesture: driving the sexual question into the hide of the social movement … His outrageous prose is justified by the novel's project: exploiting the liberating potential of the body laid bare, the subversive power of raw pleasure. Here sex becomes a tool of sabotage, it dynamites the orderly linguistic formulas of ideology, love or militant slogans.”Le Monde (Paris)

      “At the age of 27, this young Canadian author has published a raw, militant ‘syndical fiction.’ A powerful novel in which sociopolitical criticism interrogates desire and questions of gender identity. A multitude of characters gravitate towards the fascinating Querelle, the archetype of the beautiful gay male; all the young men of the region parade through his bed, utterly bewitched.”Télérama (France)

      “Lambert explodes stereotypes and taboos. I'm always partial to a writer who takes risks, who dares to find beauty in the blemishes of our souls and our desires.”—Heather O'Neill, Chatelaine

      “Querelle of Roberval represents the mature confirmation of Lambert's style, a highly poetic oral language … Lambert's writing is so alive that one reads the novel in a single sitting with the impression of having been run over by a logging truck and a horde of libidinous young men at the same time. You come out over it feeling bruised and thrilled.”La Presse (Montreal)

      “It's a pleasure to read this novel for its language and the energy it unleashes.”Le Devoir (Montreal)

      “A simple review can hardly do justice to the richness and depth of this bountiful, powerful and wildly excessive novel, with its feverish, compulsive, but always controlled, writing. “Lettres Québécoises

      “A bitter, yet empathetic, social novel.”University of Toronto Quarterly

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    The Hollow Beast Christophe Bernard Canada, Lazer Lederhendler Canada
    9781771964586 Paperback FICTION / Sagas Publication Date:April 04, 2023
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 2 in | 1 gr | 456 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Don Quixote meets Who Framed Roger Rabbit in this slapstick epic about a slapshot.

      In 1911, in a hockey game in Quebec's Gaspé Peninsula, local tough guy Billy Joe Pictou fires the puck into Monti Bouge's mouth. When Monti collapses with his head across the goal line, Victor Bradley, erstwhile referee and local mailman, rules that the goal counts. Monti's ensuing revenge for this injustice sprawls over three generations, one hundred years and dozens of alcohol-soaked tall tales, from treachery in northern gold-mining camps to the appearance of a legendary beast that can be elusive and playful or ferocious and terrifying. It is up to Monti's grandson, François, to make sense of the vendetta between Monti and Bradley that changes the destiny of their town and everyone who lives there. In a sumptuous, unpredicatable language that creates dozens of comic scenes, Christophe Bernard reveals himself as a master of perpetual storytelling.

      Bio

      Originally from Carleton-sur-Mer in the Gaspé region of Quebec, Christophe Bernard studied literature in Quebec City, Aix-en-Provence and Berlin. A prolific literary translator, Bernard was a finalist for the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award for English-to-French Translation. The Hollow Beast, a finalist for the 2018 Governor General's Literary Award for Fiction in French, won the Quebec-Ontario Prize, the Quebec Booksellers' Prize and the Jovette-Bernier Prize. Christophe Bernard lives in Burlington, Vermont.

      Lazer Lederhendler is a four-time finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award, and won the award in 2008 for his translation of Nikolski. His translation of The Immaculate Conception by Gaétan Soucy was shortlisted for the 2006 Scotiabank Giller Prize and won the French-to-English Translation Prize from the Quebec Writers’ Federation. Lederhendler lives in Montreal, where he teaches English and film at the Collège international des Marcellines.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Edelweiss digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • E-book available at same time as print edition
        • Virtual launch and festival appearances
        • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for The Hollow Beast

      "Christophe Bernard has hollowed out the past like a beast and, like an alchemist, has excavated a language of pure gold. He has added a great, savage nugget to Quebec literature."La Presse (Montreal)

      "Christophe Bernard scores a huge hit with The Hollow Beast … He gives birth to a sort of crazed novel in the form of a fireworks show … Bernard slips into the patchwork skin of a kind of Thomas Pynchon crossbred with Rabelais and Victory-Lévy Beaulieu (with a pint of James Joyce) … His writing is flamboyant with vernacular flights. An example of utter mastery."Le Devoir (Montreal)

      "The reader swims in sheer delirium reading The Hollow Beast, a novel from the Gaspé that takes place over several generations. Passionate and unsettling ... A universe plugged in at 10,000 volts!”—Radio Canada

      "A tale with plenty of momentum that covers a whole century and is at once fantastic, funny, cruel, brilliant."—Le Journal de Montréal

      "A family saga unlike any other … And it's funny! I envy this writer's talent."—L'Actualité (Montreal)

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Class Deborah Dundas Canada
    9781771964814 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Classes & Economic Disparity Publication Date:May 02, 2023
    $14.95 CAD 4.5 x 7.75 x 0.3 in | 1 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Deborah Dundas is a journalist who grew up poor and almost didn’t make it to university. In On Class, she talks to writers, activists, those who work with the poor and those who are poor about what happens when we don’t talk about poverty or class—and what will happen when we do.

      Stories about poor people are rarely written by the poor—and when they are written they tend to fit into a hero narrative. Through hard work, smarts, and temerity, the hero pulls themselves up by their bootstraps in a narrative that simply provides an easy exception: look, we don’t have to give you more, you just have to work harder. On Class is an exploration of the ways we talk about class: of who tells the stories and who doesn’t, and why that has to change. It asks the question: What don’t we talk about when we don’t talk about class? We don’t talk about luck, or privilege, or entitlement. We don’t talk about the trauma that goes along with being poor.

      Bio
      Deborah Dundas is the Books Editor at the Toronto Star and has been contributing reviews there and to other publications for more than 18 years.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

      • Print run: 5,000 copies
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • Edelweiss digital review copies
      • National TV & radio campaign
      • National print media campaign
      • Online and social media campaign
      • E-book available at same time as print edition
      • Virtual launch and festival appearances
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for the Field Notes series

      “A clear-eyed assessment of the links between property, policing, and the subjugation of Black people ... Walcott’s analysis of the ways in which white supremacy is baked into the legal systems of Canada and the U.S. is stimulating. Progressives will embrace this well-conceived call for change.”—Publishers Weekly

      “Running a brief but far-reaching and punchy 96 pages, On Property has an absolute certainty of purpose: calling for the abolition of private property ownership ... [If] statements such as ‘the problem of property is resolved through its removal’ or calls to ‘abolish everything’ can make some people quake, when Walcott’s pamphlet argues for the human ability to reconsider and rebuild societal structures, the stances come across as sensible and, better yet, doable.”—Toronto Star

      "Rinaldo Walcott locates his contribution to the Field Notes series on current issues, On Property, in the present political moment, while using historical references and events to argue for the abolition of police and property ... Walcott concludes his case by asking for a new ethics of care and economy that does not keep feeding into the incarceration system, a system rigged to continue Black suffering ... It is a question we must ask ourselves after reflecting on the ways in which we, too, are complicit."—Quill & Quire

      "Kingwell offers a slender, thoughtful, sometimes meandering disquisition on risk that “is inflected (or infected) by the virus, but not precisely about the virus—except as it grants new urgency to old questions of risk and politics. A host of cultural allusions—from Shakespeare to the Simpsons, Isaiah Berlin to Irving Berlin, Voltaire, Pascal, and Derrida—along with salient academic studies inspire Kingwell to examine the many contradictory ways that humans handle risk ... An entertaining gloss on an enduring conundrum."—Kirkus Reviews

      “Urgent, far-reaching and with a profound generosity of care, the wisdom in On Property is absolute. We cannot afford to ignore or defer its teachings. Now is the time for us-collectively-to take up the challenge in this undeniable gift of a book.”—Canisia Lubrin, author of The Dyzgraphxst and Voodoo Hypothesis

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Series: ReSet
    This Time, That Place Selected Stories Clark Blaise Canada, Margaret Atwood Canada
    9781771964890 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:October 18, 2022
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 in | 458 gr | 416 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      “Blaise is probably the greatest living Canadian writer most Canadians have never heard of.” —Quill & Quire

      “If you want to understand something about what life was like in the restless, peripatetic, striving, anxiety-ridden, shimmer cultural soup of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries," writes Margaret Atwood, "read the stories of Clark Blaise." This Time, That Place draws together twenty-four stories that span the entirety of Blaise's career, including one never previously published. Moving swiftly across place and time, through and between languages—from Florida's Confederate swamps, to working-class Pittsburgh, to Montreal and abroad—they demonstrate Blaise's profound mastery of the short story and reveal the range of his lifelong preoccupation with identity as fallacy, fable, and dream.

      This Time, That Place: Selected Stories confirms Clark Blaise as one of the best and most enduring masters of the form—on either side of our shared borders.

      Bio
      Clark Blaise (1940-), Canadian and American, is the author of 20 books of fiction and nonfiction. A longtime advocate for the literary arts in North America, Blaise has taught writing and literature at Emory, Skidmore, Columbia, NYU, Sir George Williams, UC-Berkeley, SUNY-Stony Brook, and the David Thompson University Centre. In 1968, he founded the postgraduate Creative Writing Program at Concordia University; he after went on to serve as the Director of the International Writing Program at Iowa (1990-1998), and as President of the Society for the Study of the Short Story (2002-present). Internationally recognized for his contributions to the field, Blaise has received an Arts and Letters Award for Literature from the American Academy (2003), and in 2010 was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. He lives in New York City.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

      • Print run
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • North American TV & radio campaign
      • National print campaign
      • Online and social media campaign. Giveaways through Edelweiss, Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram.
      • E-book available same date as print edition, e-book ISBN included on press materials and websites and promoted via social media
      • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for This Time, That Place

      “[Blaise] paints a restless, uneasy portrait of society at the turn of the 21st century.”—New York Times

      "The adolescent yo-yo takes many forms in This Time, That Place (Biblioasis), which recalls an old cigar box filled with undated and often cryptic postcards. [...] Individually or as a group, these loosely linked stories will reward multiple readings."—Literary Review of Canada

      "This selection contains a life’s work from one of the most important short story writers to ever live in North America. No artist before Blaise, and nobody since, has moved through the continent with so much sensitivity, compassion, and intelligence. Most at home when they are lost, Blaise’s characters search hardest for belonging when the conditions are least hospitable. For fifty peripatetic years, his beautifully crafted stories have shown us a way though. In our desperation, whenever we ask: 'Where am I now?' Clark Blaise provides the honest answer we need: 'Right here.'"—Alexander MacLeod, author of Animal Person

      "A dazzling gallery of portraits of North American lives rendered in Blaise's emotionally evocative style."—Joyce Carol Oates

      Praise for Clark Blaise

      “Blaise is probably the greatest living Canadian writer most Canadians have never heard of.” Quill & Quire

      “On the leading edge of world literature.” —John Barber, Globe and Mail

      “What holds the collection together is Blaise’s mastery of the short story, his ability to give us a whole personality and the sensuous particularity of lived experiences in a handful of pages.” —Steven Hayward, Globe and Mail

      “Blaise meticulously conveys a sense of connection and isolation in the lives of Indian immigrants who are detached from their former lives and country, ‘untethered to any earth,’ and yet are shape and guided by that absence … Such connection is beautifully contrasted by the way the opening stories fracture a single family’s narrative into multiple perspectives, illustrating the divide that separates people from one another and rendering it more tangible than any geographical border. In the end, The Meagre Tarmac is like a slow exclamation caught halfway between a sigh and laughter, between hope and despair, connection and dissonance.”—Canadian Literature

      “You know it’s going to be a stellar year for fiction when Clark Blaise publishes something. The Meagre Tarmac … demonstrates yet again that Blaise is one of the continent’s master authors.” —Uptown

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    Shimmer Alex Pugsley Canada
    9781771964692 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:May 17, 2022
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.5 in | 260 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:44 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      In ten vividly told stories, Shimmer follows characters through relationships, within social norms, and across boundaries of all kinds as they shimmer into and out of each other’s lives.

      Outside a 7-Eleven, teen boys Veeper and Wendell try to decide what to do with their night, though the thought of the rest of their lives doesn’t seem to have occurred to them. In Laurel Canyon, two movie stars try to decide if the affair they’re having might mean they like each other. When Byron, trying to figure out the chords of a song he likes, posts a question on a guitar website, he ends up meeting Jessica as well, a woman with her own difficult music. And when the snide and sharp-tongued Twyla agrees to try therapy, not even she would have imagined the results.
      Bio
      Alex Pugsley is a writer and filmmaker originally from Nova Scotia. His fiction has appeared in Brick, The Walrus, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency, and Best Canadian Stories, among other publications. His debut novel, Aubrey McKee, was published by Biblioasis in 2020. He lives in Toronto.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion


      • Print run
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • North American TV & radio campaign
      • National print campaign
      • Online and social media campaign. Giveaways through Edelweiss, Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram.
      • E-book available same date as print edition, e-book ISBN included on press materials and websites and promoted via social media
      • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Shimmer

      "Looking at Shimmer as a whole, one is struck by Pugsley’s mastery of the short-story form, his ability to distil entire lives’ worth of meaning into a few short pages. He’s not just a writer to watch: he’s a writer to savour."—Robert Wiersema, Toronto Star

      "His greatest gift as a writer is, I believe, his ability to carry dialogue ... a brave departure from the highly-praised Aubrey McKee."—Miramichi Reader

      "Pugsley brings out the confusion of life well. No one is in control. Everyone has doubts about themselves and others. His ability to show the twists and turns of our constant, anxious questioning of ourselves makes each story revelatory in a different way. A truly impressive collection!"Ottawa Review of Books

      "[Pugsley's] story proves that the digital mode of communication, while frequently castigated as impersonal and dehumanizing, can, in the right hands, carry with it strong emotional resonance."—Steven Beattie, That Shakespearean Rag

      Praise for Aubrey McKee

      Aubrey McKee is no austere, white-walled art gallery of a novel. It’s abundant, highly decorated, and unafraid of extravagance, of stylistic excess ... From ordinary incidents — a childhood acquaintance, marital strife, a wedding — as well as a few extraordinary ones, Aubrey McKee builds a dazzling and complicated world, a childhood in Halifax as a vibrant universe in itself. While Pugsley’s literary performance is an immediate delight, the portrait of the early days of a 'wayward oddity' lingers long after.”—Toronto Star

      “Evoking comparisons in both style and substance to the work of John Irving and Robertson Davies in its assemblage of perceptive, richly detailed character studies ... The life of a Canadian city is revealed with verve and insight.”—Kirkus

      “Although many peoples’ stories comprise the whole of Aubrey McKee, the city of Halifax is also a feature character ... the reverence Pugsley provides about Halifax will resonate with anyone thinking about their own hometown, no matter its size or location ... The richly defined personalities in Aubrey McKee are void of pretense or judgment and are, at once, knowable. Like a favourite song, it’s the hook that makes the adventures of Aubrey McKee and those he cares about so memorable.”—Winnipeg Free Press

      "Pugsley, equal parts poet and meticulous historian of his own private Halifax, has accomplished, with “Aubrey McKee,” a work of high literary art, remaking and claiming the city as his own once again in a sustained performance that pulses with that deep, radical love."—John Delacourt, The Ottawa Review of Books

      “The mesmerizing, kaleidoscopic Halifax depicted in Aubrey McKee is as enchanted as it is benighted, an adolescent fever-dream. This is a rollicking, strange and unforgettable coming of age novel unlike anything you've ever read.”—Lynn Coady, Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning author of Hellgoing

      “His prose style is among the finest anywhere: humorous, economical, deft without sacrificing accessibility, capable of laying bare the complicated depths, the tenderness, and the strangeness of personal relationships.”—Roo Borson, Griffin Poetry Prize-winning author of Short Journey Upriver Toward Oishida

      “Alex Pugsley’s novel, Aubrey McKee, is a whip-smart portrait of the artist at the end of the twentieth century. Funny and wildly intelligent, it captures a somewhat tragic cohort of young, ambitious Haligonians trying to become themselves, all seen through the eyes of the narrator, a young man of incomplete wisdom. In quicksilver prose, Pugsley shows us a whole generation, some of whom are lost, some found, but all viewed with a profound, comic humanity.”—Michael Redhill, Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning author of Bellevue Square

      “A wonderful book, it absolutely floored me. It's been a very long time since I've read anything like it ... I found Aubrey McKee to be more reminiscent of Dubliners by James Joyce, not only because the sense of place is so strong, but because the narrative in this book is told through interconnected stories.”—Bookin’

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