has_publisher_logo

Advanced Search
 

Biblioasis Fall 2022

more
Titles per page
  • 1
    catalogue cover
    Big Men Fear Me Mark Bourrie Canada
    9781771964937 Paperback HISTORY / Canada Publication Date:October 18, 2022
    $24.95 CAD 6 x 9 x 0.95 in | 520 gr | 320 pages Carton Quantity:14 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      The remarkable true story of the rise and fall of one of Canada's most influential yet unknown publishers and aspirational politicians.

      When George McCullagh bought The Globe and The Mail and Empire and merged them into the Globe and Mail, today still one of Canada’s preeminent daily newspapers, the 31-year-old high school dropout had already made millions on the stock market after the Crash of 1929 and the construction of his glamorous suburban Toronto estate was just the beginning of the meteoric rise of a man widely expected to one day serve as the country’s prime minister. But the self-made McCullagh had a dark side. Dogged by the bipolar disorder that destroyed his political ambitions and eventually killed him, the man who would be minister was all but written out of history, erased from the archives of his own newspaper, a loss so significant that journalist Robert Fulford has called McCullagh’s biography “one of the great unwritten books in Canadian history”—until now. In Big Men Fear Me, award-winning journalist and historian Mark Bourrie tells the remarkable story of McCullagh’s inspirational rise and devastating fall.

      Bio

      Mark Bourrie is an Ottawa-based author, lawyer, and former journalist. He holds a master’s in Journalism from Carleton University and a PhD in History from the University of Ottawa. In 2017, he was awarded a Juris Doctor degree and was called to the Bar in 2018. He has won numerous awards for his journalism, including a National Magazine Award, and received the RBC Charles Taylor Prize in 2020 for his book Bush Runner: The Adventures of Pierre Radisson.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 20,000
        • Co-op available 
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • Anticipated touring and virtual events with select festivals and indies.
        • North American TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media promotion and giveaways
        • Outreach to journalism/media associations, mental health media and organizations
        •    
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Big Men Fear Me

      "Bourrie’s book positively sings ... [it] is thoroughly researched and the prose is clean and engaging ... McCullagh deserves to be known ... He made The Globe the dominant voice in English Canadian journalism. Bourrie’s biography does him full justice."—Globe and Mail

      "There are many threads to untangle here and Bourrie—journalist, academic, and lawyer—unpicks them all. Spanning the first half of 20th-century Ontario, [George] McCullagh’s life and times become an engrossing tale of ambition, politics and bipolar illness—it’s like little else we’re likely to read this year ... It was a tumultuous life, and Bourrie tells it with wit and humour."Toronto Star

      "This is a joy of a biography ... Bourrie, a historian whose last book brought explorer Pierre Radisson to life, has done right by McCullagh, and not just with the marvellous title. Canada doesn’t like tall poppies. It didn’t end well. But what a ride it was."—Heather Mallick, Toronto Star

      "Mark Bourrie’s remarkable—and long overdue—biography of one of the most consequential and least remembered Canadians of the past century ... Bourrie toiled for years to resurrect [George McCullagh], but, I’m glad to say, he did not wipe away the carbuncles, boils, and blisters. His portrait of a man who once was among Canada’s most powerful figures is, to choose two apt terms, both melancholy and masterly."—Literary Review of Canada

      Big Men Fear Me is a masterwork of scholarship, years of careful research, and documentation and seems to have a natural feel for the times."—The Miramichi Reader

      "Not only does he give us a portrait of a man who was central to a critical period in Canadian history, he illuminates the complexities of those years as well, in the process pulling back the rosy curtain of forgetfulness and nostalgia that has slowly descended over us in the years since to remind us of how fraught our politics and society were then. A truly great accomplishment!"—Ottawa Review of Books

      "Bourrie’s research is meticulous, and his writing has great pace and bounce."—Winnipeg Free Press

      "If you love Mad Men and Netflix biopics about ruthless tie-wearing maniacs, if you're wanting the fourth wall to come crashing down on a discussion about class and poverty ... you'll probably need to pick up [Big Men Fear Me]."—Miramichi Reader

      "Mark Bourrie revives the life of George McCullagh—a charismatic high-school dropout, a self-made millionaire, the creator and owner of the Globe and Mail, and a man with great political potential—whose fall in the mid-20th century would be as steep as his rise to prominence."—Quill & Quire

      "Nineteen years in the making, Big Men Fear Me shows us what we come from: a Canada run by drunks, mystics, dreamers, gold miners and gold diggers, the horse crazy and the power mad. It’s a great story, well told."—Elaine Dewar, author of The Handover: How Bigwigs and Bureaucrats Transferred Canada's Best Publisher and the Best Part of Our Literary Heritage to a Foreign Multinational

      "What a character! Bourrie’s deeply-researched biography of George McCullagh is both a gripping encounter with a powerful yet unstable press baron and also a fascinating account of early twentieth century Ontario. Written with wit and passion, Big Men Fear Me brings back to life a man who tried to upend Canadian democracy, yet has been almost erased from our history."—Charlotte Gray, author of Murdered Midas: A Millionaire, His Gold Mine, and a Strange Death on an Island Paradise

      Praise for Bush Runner

      “Mark Bourrie beautifully describes Radisson as the ‘Forrest Gump of his time’ … well-written … compelling.”
      —Washington Times

      “A dark adventure story that sweeps the reader through a world filled with surprises. The book is compelling, authoritative, not a little disturbing—and a significant contribution to the history of 17th-century North America.”
      —Ken McGoogan, Globe and Mail

      “A remarkable biography of an even more remarkable 17th-century individual … Beautifully written and endlessly thought-provoking.”
      —Maclean’s

      “Highly entertaining reading … fascinating … an engaging achievement.”
      —Winnipeg Free Press

      “Bourrie’s writing is grounded in a strong sense of place, partly because of his own extensive knowledge of the land and partly because of Radisson’s descriptive storytelling abilities … a valuable and rare glimpse into 17th-century North America.”
      —Canadian Geographic

  • 2
    catalogue cover
    The Power of Story On Truth, the Trickster, and New Fictions for a New Era Harold R. Johnson Canada
    9781771964876 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Indigenous Studies Publication Date:October 11, 2022
    $22.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.4 in | 230 gr | 192 pages Carton Quantity:56 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Award-winning Indigenous author Harold R. Johnson discusses the promise and potential of storytelling.

      Approached by an ecumenical society representing many faiths, from Judeo-Christians to fellow members of First Nations, Harold R. Johnson agreed to host a group who wanted to hear him speak about the power of storytelling. This book is the outcome of that gathering. In The Power of Story, Johnson explains the role of storytelling in every aspect of human life, from personal identity to history and the social contracts that structure our societies, and illustrates how we can direct its potential to re-create and reform not only our own lives, but the life we share. Companionable, clear-eyed, and, above all, optimistic, Johnson’s message is both a dire warning and a direct invitation to each of us to imagine and create, together, the world we want to live in.

      Bio

      Harold R. Johnson (1954–2022) was the author of six works of fiction and six works of nonfiction, including Firewater: How Alcohol is Killing My People (and Yours), which was a finalist for the Governor General’s Literary Award for Nonfiction. Born and raised in northern Saskatchewan to a Swedish father and a Cree mother, Johnson served in the Canadian Navy and worked as a miner, logger, mechanic, trapper, fisherman, tree planter, and heavy-equipment operator. He graduated from Harvard Law School and managed a private practice for several years before becoming a Crown prosecutor. He was a member of the Montreal Lake Cree Nation.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • North American TV & radio campaign
        • Online and social media campaign and giveaways.
        • Excerpts in LitHub, Electric Lit
        • Key audience outreach: Indigenous media, ecumenical societies, cultural studies departments
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for The Power of Story

      "Johnson’s idea is a powerful one: that a person is not only the 'author' but also the 'editor' of his or her life, that reframing a narrative is enough to change it."
      —Literary Review of Canada

      "By examining Indigenous stories, ways of living, dying, and—yes—laughing, Johnson ... offer[s] powerful alternatives to hierarchical structures of society that insist on consuming the Earth’s natural resources at an unsustainable pace."
      —Steven Beattie, That Shakespearean Rag

      "[The Power of Story] is quite the legacy to leave behind ... Clear and telling, this final work by Johnson is educational, cohesive and a very intriguing read."
      —The Link

      "The Power of Story is a profoundly hopeful book, rooted in the malleability of stories we have taken for granted (the justice system and the government, to name but two), and the power of humans building out from their lifestories to effect those changes."
      —Quill & Quire

      "Recently in conversation with a friend I remarked that the whole world is a story. Harold Johnson fills that phrase with profound meaning in The Power of Story as he takes ancient figures and modernizes their storied wit and role in creating the worlds we perceive and the boundaries we need. Harold blessed us one last time with a profound conversation on the role of story in every aspect of our lives."
      —Michelle Good, author of Five Little Indians

      The Power of Story begins where all great stories begin: around a fire. Harold Johnson gives us a seat at the fire to listen and take into ourselves some spellbinding, bracing, and provocative stories told with a view to healing and transforming. As Harold writes ‘It’s starting to get darker now, and a bright fire will help.’ The Power of Story is that bright fire. And it will help. His final book is a balm for our times.”
      —Shelagh Rogers

      Praise for Harold R. Johnson

      “An extraordinary memoir by a Cree writer who understands the damage alcohol does when used to kill the pain caused by white Canadians stealing and torturing Indigenous children throughout this nation’s history. I know many white alcoholics but it’s always ‘the drunk Indian.’ Why? Firewater is a great book; it burns in the hand.”
      —Toronto Star

      “A natural storyteller, Johnson seeks imagined pasts and futurity with equal parts longing and care. This work allows readers and writers the possibility of new and ancient modes of storytelling.”
      —Tracey Lindberg, author of Birdie

      “A luminous, genre-bending memoir. Heartache and hardship are no match for the disarming whimsy, the layered storytelling shot through with love. The power of land, the pull of family, the turbulence of poverty are threads woven together with explorations of reality, tackling truth with a trickster slant.”
      —Eden Robinson, author of Son of a Trickster

      “Written in the style of a kitchen-table conversation, Johnson’s personal anecdotes and perceptive analysis are a call to return to a traditional culture of sobriety … [a] well-argued case.”
      —Publishers Weekly

  • 3
    catalogue cover
    Try Not to Be Strange The Curious History of the Kingdom of Redonda Michael Hingston Canada
    9781771964159 Paperback BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Literary Figures Publication Date:September 13, 2022
    $24.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 in | 440 gr | 302 pages Carton Quantity:28 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      On his fifteenth birthday, in the summer of 1880, future science-fiction writer M.P. Shiel sailed with his father and the local bishop from their home in the Caribbean out to the nearby island of Redonda—where, with pomp and circumstance, he was declared the island’s king. A few years later, when Shiel set sail for a new life in London, his father gave him some advice: Try not to be strange. It was almost as if the elder Shiel knew what was coming.

      Try Not to Be Strange: The Curious History of the Kingdom of Redonda tells, for the first time, the complete history of Redonda’s transformation from an uninhabited, guano-encrusted island into a fantastical and international kingdom of writers. With a cast of characters including forgotten sci-fi novelists, alcoholic poets, vegetarian publishers, Nobel Prize frontrunners, and the bartenders who kept them all lubricated while angling for the throne themselves, Michael Hingston details the friendships, feuds, and fantasies that fueled the creation of one of the oddest and most enduring micronations ever dreamt into being. Part literary history, part travelogue, part quest narrative, this cautionary tale about what happens when bibliomania escapes the shelves and stacks is as charming as it is peculiar—and blurs the line between reality and fantasy so thoroughly that it may never be entirely restored.

      Bio
      Michael Hingston is a writer and publisher in Edmonton, Alberta. He is the author of the books Let’s Go Exploring and The Dilettantes, as well as the co-author of Harnarayan Singh’s memoir One Game at a Time. Hingston’s writing has appeared in Wired, National Geographic, The Atlantic, and the Washington Post. He is also one of the co-founders of Hingston & Olsen Publishing, makers of the Short Story Advent Calendar and other literary experiments.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Edelweiss digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • E-book available at same time as print edition
        • Virtual launch and festival appearances
        • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Try Not to Be Strange

      "This combination literary history, travelogue and cautionary tale tells the history of the formerly uninhabited Caribbean island of Redonda and its development into a 'micronation' ruled by writers, beginning with the science fiction author M.P. Shiel in 1880."—New York Times

      "That spirit, the tongue-in-cheek mock seriousness of the whole endeavour, and the playfulness of its participants, is a keen factor in Try Not to Be Strange. The book is a delightful reading experience, utterly unexpected and unlike anything you are likely to read this year."—Toronto Star

      "A wonderfully entertaining book, an account of how its Canadian author grew fascinated with a literary jape, a kind of role-playing game or shared-world fantasy involving some of the most eccentric and some of the most famous writers of modern times."—Washington Post

      “Highly recommend … The fact that it involved M.P. Shiel is just the beginning of the strangeness. Great read!”—Patton Oswalt

      "Hingston traces the story of one of the strangest kingdoms in the world ... a fascinating account."—Winnipeg Free Press

      "The island [of Redonda] is the subject of the Canadian writer Michael Hingston’s often excellent Try Not to Be Strange ... A Redondan gong for Hingston seems in order: perhaps he could be made Duke of Rather Interesting Non-fiction."—The Spectator

      "Try Not to be Strange is an enjoyable account of a bizarre not-quite-real place, with a rich cast of characters—not least Hingston himself, who amusingly tracks his own obsessiveness."—Complete Review

      "Combining travelogue, memoir, and literary history, Hingston has crafted a fascinating tale full of eccentric characters. Editions of all sizes play a role in the drama, and bibliophiles will also relish the author’s auction experience."—Fine Books and Collections Magazine

      "Try Not to Be Strange is a passionate and skillfully written exploration of an extraordinary world and those who search for such places to get to the heart of what stories really mean. Hingston’s thirst for deeper knowledge is palpable, and it illuminates what the kingdom might really stand for."—Quill & Quire

      "Full of colorful personalities, exotic locales, and unexpected twists, this is a jaunty historical footnote."Publishers Weekly

      Praise for Michael Hingston

      "[Hingston] does it all with a delicious sense of humour."Quill & Quire (starred review)

      "Wise and love-driven ... full of observations, analysis, and well-researched history."Edmonton Journal

      “A fresh take on the campus novel, Michael Hingston’s debut is a droll, incisive dissection of the terrible, terribly exciting years known as post-adolescence.”—Patrick deWitt, author of The Sisters Brothers

      "This book captures the joy and excitement at first discovering Calvin and Hobbes, and the wistful sadness that it is no more."—Patton Oswalt

      "The Dilettantes is a whip-smart and very funny literary portrait of the post-ironic generation. Don't miss this."—Zoe Whittall, author of The Best Kind of People

      "His insights are rich and concise, but he never commandeers the work, as is the habit with writing about pop culture. As a critic, Hingston uses light touches of salt to bring out the flavours already in the work... A fine companion to a comic about a kid without much interest in companionship."—Bookshelf News

  • 4
    catalogue cover
    9781771965354 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:April 18, 2023
    $22.95 CAD 5 x 8 x 0.68 in | 1 gr | 224 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      “To say Heighton is an immensely talented writer is true enough but insufficient ... As good a writer as Canada has ever produced.”—National Post

      A man recalls his father's advice on how to save a drowning person, but struggles to come to terms with its application. Locked down with his new partner and her aging cat, a recovering alcoholic must continue learning how to balance control and vulnerability. When his husband dies, a son's request of his conservative father teaches both men to see one another, and their relationship, anew. In stories about love and fear, Romantic idealism and practical limitations, self-reckoning and how we learn to care for one another, Steven Heighton's Instructions for the Drowning is the unforgettable last collection by a writer working at the height of his powers.

      Bio
      Steven Heighton (1961–2022) was the author of nineteen previous books, including the Writers' Trust Hilary Weston Prize finalist Reaching Mithymna: Among the Volunteers and Refugees on Lesvos and The Waking Comes Late, winner of the Governor General's Award for poetry.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Key selling points

        • Steven Heighton, who passed away in April 2022, was the author of nineteen books, including the novel Afterlands, a New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice, the Writers' Trust Hilary Weston Prize shortlisted memoir Reaching Mithymna, and the Governor General's Award-winning poetry collection The Waking Comes Late.
        • A widely celebrated and deeply loved figure in the Canadian literary landscape, reader enthusiasm for and media and critical interest in this posthumous collection will be substantial.
        • Heighton’s previous story collections received rave reviews from the National Post (“The best stories in [The Dead Are More Visible] … are as good as the fiction of Alice Munro and Mavis Gallant.”), Globe and Mail (“Heighton is a master”), Literary Review of Canada (“Heighton has come close to producing what might be considered the perfect book of short stories”), The Observer (“Brilliant… Steven Heighton's stories aspire to an Ovidian kind of grandeur, singing of bodies, cultures and landscapes both physical and spiritual in states of transformation”), TLS (“Vivacious, purposeful and entertaining. [Heighton's] prose is both stylish and unfussy. He is one of Canada's most talented.”), and elsewhere.
        • Editorial comps include David Bergen’s Here the Dark, Alexander MacLeod’s Animal Person, and KD Miller’s Late Breaking.

        Promotion

        • Print run: 10,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Edelweiss digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • Excerpts in Granta, Lithub
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Steven Heighton

      “[A] brilliant storyteller … [His] exquisite, powerful meditations on who we are place Heighton among the great Canadian writers … His focus is contemporary, but he is a practitioner of the old school, a writer for those who love to read widely and deeply.”—Donna Bailey Nurse,
      Literary Review of Canada

      “The key to the book’s force is Heighton’s imperative to humanize and individualize everyone he encounters ... These are not statistics but people, each sensitively depicted ... A stunning book, by turns heartbreaking and affirming, fundamentally human in its depth and scope.”Quill & Quire (starred review)

      “Vivid and powerfully drawn ... The Shadow Boxer is an energetic, fluent and interesting novel by a writer who has already shown himself to be gifted, capable of exploring and experimenting with language.”—Times Literary Supplement

      “Heighton works (and plays) with words in wondrous ways few contemporary poets even dream of attempting, let alone conquering.”—Judith Fitzgerald, Globe and Mail

  • 5
    catalogue cover
    Series: ReSet
    This Time, That Place Selected Stories Clark Blaise Canada, Margaret Atwood Canada
    9781771964890 Paperback FICTION / Short Stories Publication Date:October 18, 2022
    $26.95 CAD 5.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 in | 458 gr | 416 pages Carton Quantity:32 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      “Blaise is probably the greatest living Canadian writer most Canadians have never heard of.” —Quill & Quire

      “If you want to understand something about what life was like in the restless, peripatetic, striving, anxiety-ridden, shimmer cultural soup of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries," writes Margaret Atwood, "read the stories of Clark Blaise." This Time, That Place draws together twenty-four stories that span the entirety of Blaise's career, including one never previously published. Moving swiftly across place and time, through and between languages—from Florida's Confederate swamps, to working-class Pittsburgh, to Montreal and abroad—they demonstrate Blaise's profound mastery of the short story and reveal the range of his lifelong preoccupation with identity as fallacy, fable, and dream.

      This Time, That Place: Selected Stories confirms Clark Blaise as one of the best and most enduring masters of the form—on either side of our shared borders.

      Bio
      Clark Blaise (1940-), Canadian and American, is the author of 20 books of fiction and nonfiction. A longtime advocate for the literary arts in North America, Blaise has taught writing and literature at Emory, Skidmore, Columbia, NYU, Sir George Williams, UC-Berkeley, SUNY-Stony Brook, and the David Thompson University Centre. In 1968, he founded the postgraduate Creative Writing Program at Concordia University; he after went on to serve as the Director of the International Writing Program at Iowa (1990-1998), and as President of the Society for the Study of the Short Story (2002-present). Internationally recognized for his contributions to the field, Blaise has received an Arts and Letters Award for Literature from the American Academy (2003), and in 2010 was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. He lives in New York City.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

      • Print run
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • North American TV & radio campaign
      • National print campaign
      • Online and social media campaign. Giveaways through Edelweiss, Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, Instagram.
      • E-book available same date as print edition, e-book ISBN included on press materials and websites and promoted via social media
      • Excerpts in Lit Hub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for This Time, That Place

      “[Blaise] paints a restless, uneasy portrait of society at the turn of the 21st century.”—New York Times

      "More people should read Blaise ... Contemporary life is full of irreconcilable tensions. This Time, That Place captures a handful of them, simultaneously telling stories of three countries and a multitude of identities that cut across various social, culture, political and economic dimensions."—Globe and Mail

      This Time, That Place is not only a stunning collection of fiction, it is one of considerable importance; most readers will not recognize how much they have been lacking in their reading lives until they experience the work of Clark Blaise first-hand."—Toronto Star

      "The adolescent yo-yo takes many forms in This Time, That Place (Biblioasis), which recalls an old cigar box filled with undated and often cryptic postcards. [...] Individually or as a group, these loosely linked stories will reward multiple readings."—Literary Review of Canada

      "Blaise is ... almost preternaturally adept at noticing things ... sublime technique and linguistic finesse [are] showcased in these inestimable short works."Quill & Quire, starred review

      "These stories cover ground not only geographically. They are also crowded with character and incident, always fiercely and smartly observed ... Blaise has gathered here a smart, sprawling collection of stories about family, rootlessness, and identity."—Kirkus Reviews

      "Blaise's stories are shapely and full of keenly observed details that bring their often unglamorous settings to life. For those unfamiliar with his work, This Time, That Place will come as an especially pleasant discovery."—Shelf Awareness

      "This selection contains a life’s work from one of the most important short story writers to ever live in North America. No artist before Blaise, and nobody since, has moved through the continent with so much sensitivity, compassion, and intelligence. Most at home when they are lost, Blaise’s characters search hardest for belonging when the conditions are least hospitable. For fifty peripatetic years, his beautifully crafted stories have shown us a way though. In our desperation, whenever we ask: 'Where am I now?' Clark Blaise provides the honest answer we need: 'Right here.'"—Alexander MacLeod, author of Animal Person

      "A dazzling gallery of portraits of North American lives rendered in Blaise's emotionally evocative style."—Joyce Carol Oates

      Praise for Clark Blaise

      “Blaise is probably the greatest living Canadian writer most Canadians have never heard of.” Quill & Quire

      “On the leading edge of world literature.” —John Barber, Globe and Mail

      “What holds the collection together is Blaise’s mastery of the short story, his ability to give us a whole personality and the sensuous particularity of lived experiences in a handful of pages.” —Steven Hayward, Globe and Mail

      “Blaise meticulously conveys a sense of connection and isolation in the lives of Indian immigrants who are detached from their former lives and country, ‘untethered to any earth,’ and yet are shape and guided by that absence … Such connection is beautifully contrasted by the way the opening stories fracture a single family’s narrative into multiple perspectives, illustrating the divide that separates people from one another and rendering it more tangible than any geographical border. In the end, The Meagre Tarmac is like a slow exclamation caught halfway between a sigh and laughter, between hope and despair, connection and dissonance.”—Canadian Literature

      “You know it’s going to be a stellar year for fiction when Clark Blaise publishes something. The Meagre Tarmac … demonstrates yet again that Blaise is one of the continent’s master authors.” —Uptown

  • 6
    catalogue cover
    Case Study Graeme Macrae Burnet
    9781771965200 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:November 01, 2022
    $24.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.78 in | 300 gr | 288 pages Carton Quantity:34 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Shortlisted for the 2022 Gordon Burn Prize • Shortlisted for the 2022 Ned Kelly Awards • Longlisted for the 2022 Booker Prize • Longlisted for the 2022 HWA Gold Crown Award

      SELECTED BY NEW YORK TIMES AS ONE OF 100 NOTABLE BOOKS OF 2022

      The Booker-shortlisted author of His Bloody Project blurs the lines between patient and therapist, fiction and documentation, and reality and dark imagination.

      London, 1965. 'I have decided to write down everything that happens, because I feel, I suppose, I may be putting myself in danger,' writes an anonymous patient, a young woman investigating her sister's suicide. In the guise of a dynamic and troubled alter-ego named Rebecca Smyth, she makes an appointment with the notorious and roughly charismatic psychotherapist Collins Braithwaite, whom she believes is responsible for her sister's death. But in this world of beguilement and bamboozlement, neither she nor we can be certain of anything.

      Case Study is a novel as slippery as it is riveting, as playful as it is sinister, a meditation on truth, sanity, and the instability of identity by one of the most inventive novelists of our time.

      Bio
      Graeme Macrae Burnet is one of the UK’s leading contemporary novelists. His novels, which include the Booker Prize-shortlisted His Bloody Project, have been translated into more than twenty languages. He lives and works in Glasgow.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 20,000
        • IndieNext campaign
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • National print media publicity campagin
        • National broadcast media publicity campaign
        • North American author tour
        • Online and social media campaign and giveaways
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Booker Prize 2022, Long-listed
      Reviews

      Praise for Case Study

      "Case Study has a lot in common with the novels of Vladimir Nabokov and Roberto Bolaño, in which invented characters pass through tumultuous episodes of literary history that never quite happened, though it seems as if they should have ... Case Study is a diverting novel, overflowing with clever plays on and inversions of tropes of English intellectual and social life during the postwar decades."
      —New York Times

      "A mystery story—or is it?—that takes us into the heart of the psychoanalytical consulting room. Or does it? Interleaving a biography of radical '60s 'untherapist' Collins Braithwaite with the notebooks of his patient 'Rebecca', a young woman seeking answers about the death of her sister, 'GMB' presents a forensic, elusive and mordantly funny text(s) layered with questions about authenticity and the self."
      —2022 Booker Prize Jury Statement

      "A twisting and often wickedly humorous work of crime fiction that meditates on the nature of sanity, identity and truth itself."
      —Gordon Burn Prize Jury Citation

      "Macrae's novel works on various levels. It is an elaborate, mind-bending guessing game; it is a blackly comic and quietly moving study of a nervous breakdown; and it is a captivating portrait of an egomaniac ... Macrae has reliably delivered another work of fiendish fun."
      —Star Tribune

      "Burnet is the ultimate unreliable narrator, and Case Study serves as a worthy addition to his oeuvre."
      —Chicago Review of Books

      "It is a truly riveting novel, entertaining as it makes you question everything about it, and beautifully written. There are no wasted words in this book."
      —Miramichi Reader

      "The fictional author and Burnet share the same initials, which should be a clue as to how close the book will come to breaking the fourth wall ... The matryoshka-style layering of narratives, each dependent on the other, is engaging and disorienting. Case Study is an immersive novel that stretches its fiction to fact-like proportions."
      —Foreword Reviews (starred review)

      "Case Study is a dizzying dive into British counterculture of the 1960s and the radical anti-psychiatry movement ... wildly inventive and slickly written. The notebooks feel so casually and authentically from the period, with 'Rebecca’s' word choices and the details she includes saying as much about 1960s British society as they do about her place in it. 'Rebecca' is deliciously unreliable as a narrator."
      —Jessica Brockmole, Historical Novels Review (Editors' Choice)

      "Ironical, intelligent and intriguing from first page to last, the fourth novel from Glasgow-based Graeme Macrae Burnet ... questions the tricky nature of identity."
      —Winnipeg Free Press

      "Burnet evokes a place and an era very nicely, in pitch-perfect prose ... Case Study is an artfully twisted and presented fiction about identity and the stories we tell, and a wonderful evocation of 1960s London."
      —Complete Review

      "Burnet weaves together 'found' documents and the biography of a controversial psychologist to create an indelible portrait of a power struggle in 1960s London."
      —Vol 1. Brooklyn

      "Case Study reflects on relationships of power: the physical power of abusive men over women, the lingering power of memory over oneself."
      —The Michigan Daily

      "A provocative send-up of midcentury British mores and the roots of modern psychotherapy … brisk and engaging."
      —Kirkus

      "Burnet's deployment of multiple narrative structures, his finely tuned depiction of Braithwaite, and the fascinating revelations of the diarist result in an unforgettable story, one that will rattle readers long after its startling, disorientating ending."
      —Shelf Awareness

      “Encourages us to look more closely at the inherent instability of fiction itself … genuinely affecting … a very funny book.”
      —Nina Allan, The Guardian

      "Burnet propels readers through the novel with his fierce, hilarious intelligence."
      —Crime Reads

      “Brilliant, bamboozling … Burnet captures his characters’ voices so brilliantly that what might have been just an intellectual game feels burstingly alive and engaging.”
      —Telegraph

      “A riveting psychological plot ... tortuous, cunning ... clever. ”
      —Times Literary Supplement

      “Burnet’s triumph is that it’s a page-turning blast, funny, sinister and perfectly plotted so as to reveal—or withhold—its secrets in a consistently satisfying way … Rarely has being constantly wrong-footed been so much fun.”
      —The Times

      “Such is Burnet’s skill that he immediately convinces the reader that everything he is about to say is based on historical fact … brilliantly depicted … intriguing … compulsive reading.”
      —Irish Times

      “You’ll be completely beguiled by this sly, darkly comic offering, with its unreliable narrator and its equally unreliable author.”
      —Mail on Sunday

      “What’s real and what’s not is beside the point in this skillful portrait of a disturbed woman and her encounters with an experimental 1960s psychotherapist … Both strands quickly become compelling … I was hooked like a fish.”
      —Spectator

      Praise for Graeme Macrae Burnet's His Bloody Project

      "It’s only a story—or is it? Graeme Macrae Burnet makes such masterly use of the narrative form that the horrifying tale he tells in His Bloody Project ... seems plucked straight out of Scotland’s sanguinary historical archives.”
      —New York Times Book Review

      “Both a horrific tale of violence and a rumination on the societal problems for poor sharecroppers of the era.”
      —TIME

      “[A] powerful, absorbing novel … Authors from Henry James to Vladimir Nabokov to Gillian Flynn have used [an unreliable narrator] to induce ambiguity, heighten suspense and fold an alternative story between the lines of a printed text. Mr. Burnet, a Glasgow author, does all of that and more in this page-turning period account of pathos and violence in 19th-century Scotland … [A] cleverly constructed tale … Has the lineaments of the crime thriller but some of the sociology of a Thomas Hardy novel.”
      —Wall Street Journal

      “Recalls William Styron’s The Confessions of Nat Turner in the way it portrays an abused people and makes the ensuing violence understandable … His Bloody Project shows that the power held by landowners and overseers allowed cruelties just like those suffered by the Virginia slaves in Confessions. Halfway between a thriller and a sociological study of an exploitive economic system with eerie echoes to our own time, His Bloody Project is a gripping and relevant read.”
      —Newsweek

      “A thriller with a fine literary pedigree ... His Bloody Project offers an intricate, interactive puzzle, a crime novel written, excuse my British, bloody well.”
      —Los Angeles Times

  • 7
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Browsing Jason Guriel Canada
    9781771965101 Paperback LITERARY CRITICISM / Books & Reading Publication Date:October 04, 2022
    $15.95 CAD 4.25 x 7.75 x 0.3 in | 100 gr | 112 pages Carton Quantity:96 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A defense of the dying art of losing an afternoon—and gaining new appreciation—amidst the bins and shelves of bricks-and-mortar shops.

      Written during the pandemic, when the world was marooned at home and consigned to scrolling screens, On Browsing’s essays chronicle what we’ve lost through online shopping, streaming, and the relentless digitization of culture. The latest in the Field Notes series, On Browsing is an elegy for physical media, a polemic in defense of perusing the world in person, and a love letter to the dying practice of scanning bookshelves, combing CD bins, and losing yourself in the stacks.

      Bio

      Jason Guriel is the author of several books, including the verse novel Forgotten Work (Biblioasis 2020). His writing has appeared in Air Mail, The Atlantic, The Walrus, Slate, The Yale Review, and many other magazines. He lives in Toronto.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • Excerpts in The Walrus, LitHub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for On Browsing

      "Browsing is many things: a lifestyle, a relaxation, a revelation if your search finds a long-sought book or a rare recording, and perhaps more importantly a soul-refreshing excursion in a world of instant online search-and-buy options."
      —Winnipeg Free Press

      "'Our choices are chisels,' says Jason Guriel. This moving book will fill you with a good kind of sadness and help you understand your own nostalgias.”
      —Nicholson Baker, author of The Mezzanine

      "A mall parking lot, a defunct record store, the lingering crease on a book cover—across the all-flattening boundary of the digital age, Guriel recalls what it meant to access the universal one particular, physical piece at a time."
      —Tom Scocca, author of Beijing Welcomes You: Unveiling the Capital City of the Future

      Praise for Forgotten Work

      “A futuristic dystopian rock novel in rhymed couplets, this rollicking book is as unlikely, audacious and ingenious as the premise suggests.”
      —New York Times

      “A wondrous novel.”
      —Ron Charles, Washington Post

      “What do you get when you throw John Shade, Nick Drake, Don Juan, Sarah Records, and Philip K. Dick into a rhymed couplet machine? Equal parts memory and forgetting, detritus and elegy, imagination and fancy, Forgotten Work could be the most singular novel-in-verse since Vikram Seth’s The Golden Gate. Thanks to Jason Guriel’s dexterity in metaphor-making, I found myself stopping and rereading every five lines or so, to affirm my surprise and delight.”
      —Stephen Metcalf

      “This book has no business being as good as it is. Heroic couplets in the twenty-first century? It’s not a promising idea, but Forgotten Work is intelligent, fluent, funny, and wholly original. I can’t believe it exists.”
      —Christian Wiman

  • 8
    catalogue cover
    Series: Field Notes
    On Class Deborah Dundas Canada
    9781771964814 Paperback SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Classes & Economic Disparity Publication Date:May 02, 2023
    $15.95 CAD 4.5 x 7.75 x 0.3 in | 1 gr | 128 pages Carton Quantity:1 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      Deborah Dundas is a journalist who grew up poor and almost didn’t make it to university. In On Class, she talks to writers, activists, those who work with the poor and those who are poor about what happens when we don’t talk about poverty or class—and what will happen when we do.

      Stories about poor people are rarely written by the poor—and when they are written they tend to fit into a hero narrative. Through hard work, smarts, and temerity, the hero pulls themselves up by their bootstraps in a narrative that simply provides an easy exception: look, we don’t have to give you more, you just have to work harder. On Class is an exploration of the ways we talk about class: of who tells the stories and who doesn’t, and why that has to change. It asks the question: What don’t we talk about when we don’t talk about class? We don’t talk about luck, or privilege, or entitlement. We don’t talk about the trauma that goes along with being poor.

      Bio
      Deborah Dundas is the Books Editor at the Toronto Star and has been contributing reviews there and to other publications for more than 18 years.
      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

      • Print run: 5,000 copies
      • Co-op available
      • Advance reader copies
      • Edelweiss digital review copies
      • National TV & radio campaign
      • National print media campaign
      • Online and social media campaign
      • E-book available at same time as print edition
      • Virtual launch and festival appearances
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for the Field Notes series

      “A clear-eyed assessment of the links between property, policing, and the subjugation of Black people ... Walcott’s analysis of the ways in which white supremacy is baked into the legal systems of Canada and the U.S. is stimulating. Progressives will embrace this well-conceived call for change.”—Publishers Weekly

      “Running a brief but far-reaching and punchy 96 pages, On Property has an absolute certainty of purpose: calling for the abolition of private property ownership ... [If] statements such as ‘the problem of property is resolved through its removal’ or calls to ‘abolish everything’ can make some people quake, when Walcott’s pamphlet argues for the human ability to reconsider and rebuild societal structures, the stances come across as sensible and, better yet, doable.”—Toronto Star

      "Rinaldo Walcott locates his contribution to the Field Notes series on current issues, On Property, in the present political moment, while using historical references and events to argue for the abolition of police and property ... Walcott concludes his case by asking for a new ethics of care and economy that does not keep feeding into the incarceration system, a system rigged to continue Black suffering ... It is a question we must ask ourselves after reflecting on the ways in which we, too, are complicit."—Quill & Quire

      "Kingwell offers a slender, thoughtful, sometimes meandering disquisition on risk that “is inflected (or infected) by the virus, but not precisely about the virus—except as it grants new urgency to old questions of risk and politics. A host of cultural allusions—from Shakespeare to the Simpsons, Isaiah Berlin to Irving Berlin, Voltaire, Pascal, and Derrida—along with salient academic studies inspire Kingwell to examine the many contradictory ways that humans handle risk ... An entertaining gloss on an enduring conundrum."—Kirkus Reviews

      “Urgent, far-reaching and with a profound generosity of care, the wisdom in On Property is absolute. We cannot afford to ignore or defer its teachings. Now is the time for us-collectively-to take up the challenge in this undeniable gift of a book.”—Canisia Lubrin, author of The Dyzgraphxst and Voodoo Hypothesis

  • 9
    catalogue cover
    Confessions with Keith Pauline Holdstock Canada
    9781771964975 Paperback FICTION / Literary Publication Date:September 20, 2022
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.8 in | 300 gr | 304 pages Carton Quantity:36 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      An outrageously comic novel documents a middle-aged writer and mother's grappling with mid-life crisis—her husband's and her own.

      Preoccupied with her fledgling literary career, intent on the all-consuming consolations of philosophy, and scrambling to meet the demands of her four children, the acutely myopic and chronically inattentive Vita Glass doesn’t notice that her house and her marriage are competing to see which can fall apart fastest. She can barely find time for her writing career, and just when her newfound success in vegetable erotica is beginning to take off. Our heroine’s only tried and trusted escape is the blissful detachment of Keith's hairdressing salon, but when her husband leaves the country, unannounced, she decides to do likewise—in the opposite direction, and with their children. Drawn from the pages of Vita’s journal, this outrageously comic novel documents Vita's passage through a mid-life crisis and explores all the ways we deceive each other and ourselves.

      Bio

      Pauline Holdstock is an award winning novelist, short fiction writer and essayist. Her books have been published in the US, the UK, Australia, Germany, Brazil and Portugal. In Canada, her work has been short-listed for the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Commonwealth Writer's Prize, and others, and has won the BC Book Prizes Award for Fiction and the City of Victoria Butler Book Prize. She lives on Vancouver Island.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotions

        • Print run: 5,000 copies
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • National TV & radio campaign
        • National print media campaign
        • Online and social media campaign
        • Excerpts in LitHub, Electric Lit
    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Confessions with Keith

      "Magnetic ... artfully expressed—funny, honest, wry, intimate—private thoughts ... On page after assured page, Vita’s confounded, thrilled, irked, hurt, and envious—about minutia as well as the big picture—and all of which are facets of what she terms 'the senselessness of human existence.'"
      The Vancouver Sun

      "Succinct, cheeky prose ... Holdstock’s fast-paced comic novel with its entertaining narrative will captivate readers, especially those who relish domestic tales."
      —Winnipeg Free Press

      "Things going wrong on many levels is the focus of the novel, but Vita’s ability to plough through the problems and often see the humour even when exhausted is refreshing ... Confessions with Keith deals with real life issues in a frenetic and funny manner."
      —Candace Fertile, The BC Review

      "A deftly crafted and wickedly fun read from cover to cover, Confessions with Keith by novelist Pauline Holdstock is the kind of story that will linger in the mind and memory long after the book itself has been finished and set back upon the shelf."
      —Midwest Book Review

      "Confessions with Keith reminds us that life is a raw, radiant, and ridiculous story unfolding moment by moment for everyone in their separate subjectivities. It deserves laughter. It deserves tears. It is made more bearable by books like this, the literary equivalent of uncensored midnight conversation over cups of tea or glasses—plural—of wine."
      —Amy Reiswig, Focus on Victoria

      "With ample wit, Pauline Holdstock perfectly articulates the quiet sacrifice and crushing weight of keeping domestic order in the face of chaos. Confessions with Keith is not only a laugh-out-loud joy to read, but is bursting with incredible insight, and lends much-needed visibility to the inner life of a woman overlooked. A sheer delight of a book."
      —Stacey May Fowles, co-editor of Good Mom on Paper

      Praise for Pauline Holdstock

      “Holdstock writes powerfully in Frankie’s voice, drawing readers into his internal life … absorbing.”
      —Quill & Quire

      “Pauline Holdstock enchants with a spell of delectable storytelling … the novel’s wonderment and delight in the possibilities of life is an effervescent tonic.”
      —Vancouver Sun

      “Captivating … An intriguing mystery … The novel finds its way with charming intrigue and humour.”
      —Winnipeg Free Press

      “Holdstock’s writing moves seamlessly between her research and her polished storytelling of people, landscape and grief. These are familiar preoccupations, but she continues to make them compelling and rich.”
      —National Post

      “Pauline Holdstock’s language is so powerful, her writing so wrought with emotion and beauty, that you become fully lost in her world.”
      —Winnipeg Review

  • 10
    catalogue cover
    9781771965057 Paperback LITERARY COLLECTIONS / Essays Publication Date:November 01, 2022
    $22.95 CAD 5.25 x 8.25 x 0.75 in | 320 gr | 240 pages Carton Quantity:40 Canadian Rights: Y Biblioasis
    • Marketing Copy

      Description

      A journalist and folklorist explores the truths that underlie the stories we imagine—and reveals the magic in the everyday.

      “I’ve always felt that the term fairy tale doesn’t quite capture the essence of these stories,” writes Emily Urquhart. “I prefer the term wonder tale, which is Irish in origin, for its suggestion of awe coupled with narrative. In a way, this is most of our stories.” In this startlingly original essay collection, Urquhart reveals the truths that underlie our imaginings: what we see in our heads when we read, how the sight of a ghost can heal, how the entrance to the underworld can be glimpsed in an oil painting or a winter storm—or the onset of a loved one’s dementia. In essays on death and dying, pregnancy and prenatal genetics, radioactivity, chimeras, cottagers, and plague, Ordinary Wonder Tales reveals the essential truth: if you let yourself look closely, there is magic in the everyday.

      Bio

      Emily Urquhart is a journalist with a doctorate in folklore. Her award-winning work has appeared in Longreads, Guernica, and The Walrus, and elsewhere, and her first book was shortlisted for the Kobo First Book Prize and the BC National Award for Canadian Nonfiction. Her most recent book, The Age of Creativity: Art, Memory, my Father and Me, was listed as a top book of 2020 by CBC, NOW Magazine and Quill & Quire. She is a nonfiction editor for The New Quarterly and lives in Kitchener, Ontario.

      Marketing & Promotion

        Promotion

        • Print run: 5,000
        • Co-op available
        • Advance reader copies
        • Digital review copies
        • North American TV & radio campaign
        • Online and social media campaign and giveaways.
        • Excerpts in LitHub, Electric Lit
        • Key audience outreach: feminist interest and media, folklore associations
    • Content Preview

    • Awards & Reviews

      Awards
      Reviews

      Praise for Ordinary Wonder Tales

      "Non-fiction that hums with truth and life. Emily Urquhart writes about family, pain, fear and genetics all through the lens of folk tales and folk history. It proves a deeply moving meditation on the stories we tell ourselves, collectively and individually, to make sense of the insensible magical wonderful awful parts of our ordinary lives."—Carrie Snyder, for the Globe and Mail

      "A book of both deep thought and intense feeling, Ordinary Wonder Tales is, literally, a collection of wonders, and a truly beautiful account of a life lived in the nexus of the temporal and the eternal. It’s a treasure."—Toronto Star

      "In Ordinary Wonder Tales, Urquhart stylishly combines her personal experiences with her academic expertise, leading to a reading experience that feels entertaining and casual yet also edifying ... It’s a testament to Urquhart’s own formidable storytelling skill that each of her essays inspires a quiet awe."LIBER: A Feminist Review

      "Ordinary Wonder Tales will have readers conjuring up memories of their first encounters with fairy tales, fables, and storytelling ... if you're compelled to imagine the mysterious forgotten worlds of imagination, of fables and possibilities ... you'll probably need to pick up [this book]."—Miramichi Reader

      "A collective masterpiece of literary criticism, insights, observations, perceptions, and appreciation, Ordinary Wonder Tales by Emily Urquhart is an extraordinarily thoughtful and thought-provoking read."—Midwest Book Review

      "The mix of heady and magical will be spellbinding to memoir readers with a ready sense of wonder."Publishers Weekly

      "Urquhart’s corrobation of legends to day-to-day life offers the same getaway and warmth that indulging in a supernatural world can. So, to all the retired fantasy lovers out there, please do yourself a favor and read this book."—The Link

      Ordinary Wonder Tales is so well-written, so full of enriching, unexpected connections, so captivating; a reader will be tempted to consume it in gulps, and then go back for seconds.”—The Telegram

      "Urquhart draws connections between the experiences of everyday life—love, grief, pride, fear—and the imaginative universes of the stories we tell and retell."—Quill & Quire

      "I am devouring it ... It’s incredibly current, even urgent."—Joan Sullivan, Newfoundland Quarterly

      "These essays—beautiful, rich and absorbing—will change the way you see your place in the world, and they’ll leave you noticing all the magic at its fringes."Kerry Clare, Pickle Me This

      "A highly readable, fascinating collection ... The pieces are thoughtful and ... enriching. The book is captivating, and as one critic has said, spellbinding."—TheCommentary

      "In this collection of essays, Urquhart seamlessly melds her research with snippets of everyday life on topics including death and dying, the plague, and pregnancy."—Toronto Life

      "With insight, compassion, and skill, Emily Urquhart’s essays delve into the intricate wonders of our lives. This book is magical in every sense of the term—a beautiful ode to both the natural world and the supernatural one, and all of the ways in which our human hearts traverse the space between these shifting places."—Amanda Leduc, author of The Centaur's Wife and Disfigured: On Fairy Tales, Disability, and Making Space

      Praise for Beyond the Pale

      “[Urquhart] isn’t afraid to make the personal political, to delve into her particular experience while also acknowledging its limits and investigating what lies beyond them. Urquhart’s as interested in championing individuality as she is in embracing our shared humanity. But she never shies away from the fact that cherishing both can be a knotty, contradictory affair.”
      —Globe & Mail

      “A courageous and ambitious book. Beyond the Pale offers an intimate account about raising a daughter with albinism, a lucid portrait of related genetic, medical and social issues, and a disturbing reminder of the brutal violence that many people with albinism continue to face today.”—Lawrence Hill, author of The Book of Negroes and Blood: The Stuff of Life

      “A brave, thoughtful, clear, and always graceful journey through the terrifying randomness of genetics and the unexpected ways genetic anomalies can mark not just children, but all the lives around them.”
      —Ian Brown, author of The Boy in the Moon: A Father’s Search for his Disabled Son

      “A graceful, perceptive rendering of a misunderstood condition.”
      —Kirkus Reviews

      “Folklorist Urquhart writes poetically and movingly about her daughter … readers will weep and smile.”
      —Booklist

Select a Market


Forgotten Password

Please enter your email address and click submit. An email with instructions on resetting your password will be sent to you.

Forgotten Password

An email has been sent out with instructions for resetting your password.