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Dadibaajim
Returning Home through Narrative
By (author): Helen Olsen Agger

ISBN:

9780887559549

Product Form:

Paperback

Form detail:

Trade
Paperback , Trade
English

Audience:

General/trade
Oct 01, 2021
$27.95 CAD
Active

Dimensions:

9in x 6 x 0.68 in | 405 gr

Page Count:

272 pages

Illustrations:

34 B&W illustrations, 10 Tables, black and white, Bibliography, Index, Glossary
FSC certified – mixed sources C016245
University of Manitoba Press
HISTORY / Indigenous Peoples of the Americas
Relating to Native American people|Indigenous peoples|History of the Americas|Northwestern Ontario
Ontario
  • Short Description
Dadibaajim examines that history of encroaching settlement and dispossession as it reasserts the voices and presence of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg too long ignored for the convenience of settler society.
Dadibaajim narratives are of and from the land, born from experience and observation. Invoking this critical Anishinaabe methodology for teaching and learning, Helen Olsen Agger documents and reclaims the history, identity, and inherent entitlement of the Namegosibii Anishinaabeg to the care, use, and occupation of their Trout Lake homelands. When Agger’s mother, Dedibaayaanimanook, was born in 1922, the community had limited contact with Euro-Canadian settlers and still lived throughout their territory according to seasonal migrations along agricultural, hunting, and fishing routes. By the 1940s, colonialism was in full swing: hydro development had resulted in major flooding of traditional territories, settlers had overrun Trout Lake for its resource, tourism, and recreational potential, and the Namegosibii Anishinaabe were forced out of their homelands in Treaty 3 territory, north-western Ontario. Agger mines an archive of treaty paylists, census records, and the work of influential anthropologists like A.I. Hallowell, but the dadibaajim narratives of eight community members spanning three generations form the heart of this book. Dadibaajim provide the framework that fills in the silences and omissions of the colonial record. Embedded in Anishinaabe language and epistemology, they record how the people of Namegosibiing experienced the invasion of interlocking forces of colonialism and globalized neo-liberalism into their lives and upon their homelands. Ultimately, Dadibaajim is a message about how all humans may live well on the earth.

·       It offers an emic perspective, often voiced as candid statements about how ancestors thought about the treaty system, disregard of Anishinaabe human rights and dignity, and concepts of honesty and respect.

·       An important and unique legacy piece for the people and descendants of Namegosibiing and the surrounding region that prioritizes Anishinaabe ways of being in the world through an Anishnaabe lens. 

·       We love the elements of oral storytelling in this book.

·       This book should appeal to those from the Namegosibii Anishinaabe of Trout Lake and other nearby communities, as well as all of Ontario.

Helen Olsen Agger is Anishinaabe and holds a PhD in Native Studies from the University of Manitoba. She is the author of Following Nimishoomis: The Trout Lake History of Dedibaayaanimanook Sarah Keesick Olsen.

“Dadibaajim is the product of a lifetime of reflection, and the distilled narrative we are presented shares an invaluable part of our Anishinaabe – and larger human – story that might have otherwise never been told. This work brings new value and appreciation for the role and positionality of our senior and traditional Elders, our Indigenous languages, and knowledge building customs and protocols that are inherent to the community. - Brian McInnes, author of Sounding Thunder: The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow

"Dadibaajim is a fascinating story of the people and the land told from a uniquely Anishinaabe perspective. It also gives us hope for the future of these stories and traditions, particularly in the narratives, experiences, and perspectives of the younger generations that are represented." - Brian McInnes, author of Sounding Thunder: The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow

“Dadibaajim is brilliant in its unapologetic incorporation of Anishinaabemowin and its prioritizing of Anishinaabe ways of being in the world. It contributes to important decolonial work and challenges settler histories and discourse.” - Brittany Luby and Margaret Lehman, The Manomin Project


"Dadibaajimis a fascinating story of the people and the land told from a uniquely Anishinaabe perspective. It also gives us hope for the future of these stories and traditions, particularly in the narratives, experiences, and perspectives of the younger generations that are represented."

- Brian McInnes, author of Sounding Thunder: The Stories of Francis Pegahmagabow

Dadibaajim is brilliant in its unapologetic incorporation of Anishinaabemowin and its prioritizing of Anishinaabe way of being in the world. It contributes to important decolonial work and challenges settler histories and discourse."

- Brittany Luby, author of Dammed: The Politics of Loss and Survival in Anishinaabe Territory

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