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Ampersand Indigenous Books

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Châhkâpâs
A Naskapi Legend
By (author): John Peastitute Edited by: Marguerite MacKenzie Translated by: Julie Brittain Translated by: Silas Nabinicaboo Foreword by: Arok Wolvengrey Drawings by: Elizabeth Jancewicz With: Bill Jancewicz
John Peastitute ,

Edited by :

Marguerite MacKenzie ,

Translated by :

Julie Brittain ,

Translated by :

Silas Nabinicaboo ,

Foreword by :

Arok Wolvengrey ,

Drawings by :

Elizabeth Jancewicz ,

With :

Bill Jancewicz

ISBN:

9780889778290

Product Form:

Paperback

Form detail:

Trade
Paperback , Trade
English, North American Indian languages

Audience:

General Trade
Oct 09, 2021
$24.95 CAD
Active

Dimensions:

228.6 x 152.4 x 6.35 mm | 260 gr

Page Count:

264 pages
University of Regina Press
FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY / Indigenous Languages of the Americas
Châhkâpâs: A Naskapi Legend shares the story of Châhkâpâs, a heroic figure in First Nations storytelling, who performs feats of strength and skill in spite of his diminutive size.

The book shares this traditional legend as originally recorded in the Naskapi community in northern Quebec in 1967 when it was narrated by John Peastitute, a Naskapi Elder and accomplished storyteller. Transcribed in the Naskapi language and syllabic orthography, the book offers a literary resource for the Naskapi language community, and the English translation enables those unfamiliar with the language, or the story, to discover this important legend.

The book also contains extensive analysis of stories about Châhkâpâs, notes about the provenance of the recordings, a biography of the storyteller, and a history of the Naskapi people. Lavish illustrations from Elizabeth Jancewicz—an artist raised in the Naskapi community—provide a sensitive and accurate graphical account of the legend, which has also been approved by Naskapi speakers themselves.

John Peastitute (1896–1981) was a Naskapi Elder who was not only well respected as a story-keeper, but also a storyteller. His repertoire of both tipâchimûna and âtiyûhkinch (stories from a distant “time before now,” often called legends) was extensive, and his performances engaging. The tapes of his stories that have survived to be processed and studied are a precious legacy.

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