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Ampersand Indigenous Books

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You Might Be Sorry You Read This
By (author): Michelle Poirier Brown

ISBN:

9781772126037

Product Form:

Paperback

Form detail:

Trade
Paperback , Trade
English, Translated from: English

Audience:

General Trade
Mar 01, 2022
$19.99 CAD
Forthcoming

Dimensions:

9in x 6 x 0.2 in | 120 gr

Page Count:

80 pages
The University of Alberta Press
POETRY / Canadian / Indigenous
Modern and contemporary poetry (c 1900 onwards)|Poetry by individual poets|Canada
Canada
  • Short Description
You Might Be Sorry You Read This is a stunning debut, revealing how breaking silences and reconciling identity can refine anger into something both useful and beautiful. A poetic memoir that looks unflinchingly at childhood trauma (both incestuous rape and surviving exposure in extreme cold), it also tells the story of coming to terms with a hidden Métis heritage. Honouring the complexities of Indigenous identity and the raw experiences of womanhood, mental illness, and queer selfhood, these narratives carry weight. They tell us “You need / only be the simple / expression of the divine / intent / that is your life.” A journey of pain, belonging, hope, and resilience, there is a lifetime in these poems.
You Might Be Sorry You Read This is a stunning debut, revealing how breaking silences and reconciling identity can refine anger into something both useful and beautiful. A poetic memoir that looks unflinchingly at childhood trauma (both incestuous rape and surviving exposure in extreme cold), it also tells the story of coming to terms with a hidden Indigenous identity when the poet discovered her Métis heritage at age 38. This collection is a journey of pain, belonging, hope, and resilience. The confessional poems are polished yet unpretentious, often edgy but humorous; they explore trauma yet prioritize the poet’s story. Honouring the complexities of Indigenous identity and the raw experiences of womanhood, mental illness, and queer selfhood, these narratives carry weight. They tell us “You need / only be the simple / expression of the divine / intent / that is your life.” There is a lifetime in these poems.

About the Book: • You Might Be Sorry You Read This is a stunning debut, revealing how breaking silences and reconciling identity can refine anger into something both useful and beautiful. • A poetic memoir that looks unflinchingly at childhood trauma and the writer’s experience of PTSD. • It also tells the story of coming to terms with a hidden Indigenous identity; the poet discovered her Métis heritage at age 38. • This collection is a journey of pain, belonging, hope, and resilience. • The confessional poems are polished yet unpretentious, often edgy but humorous; they explore trauma yet prioritize the poet’s story. • Honouring the complexities of Indigenous identity and the raw experiences of womanhood, mental illness, and queer selfhood, these narratives carry weight. • There is a lifetime in these poems. • Author website: www.michellepoirierbrown.ca “I was raised in a family that acknowledged my mother’s Ukrainian heritage, but was oblivious to my father’s hidden Indigenous identity. As a child, I was sometimes asked if I was Chinese. As an adult, there was a quality to my encounters with Indigenous people that I didn’t understand—until I learned to see myself as my husband, neighbours, and colleagues already saw me.” Audience: This book fits with confessional and trauma writing. The most obvious market is the literary community and readers, particularly people who read Indigenous poetry. The accessible style will appeal to people who don't usually read poetry, and the book can be expected to generate a readership among Métis people, among settlers who have an interest in deepening their understanding of Indigenous experience, and feminists and people who identify as queer. Another key market is university instructors teaching Literature, Creative Writing, Gender Studies, Women’s Studies, and Indigenous Studies. About the Poet: Michelle Poirier Brown is an internationally-published poet, performer, and photographer. She is nêhiýaw-iskwêw and a citizen of the Métis Nation. A feminist activist and retired federal treaty negotiator, Poirier Brown now lives in Lekwungen territory (Victoria, BC).

Michelle Poirier Brown is an internationally published poet and performer, currently living in Lekwungen territory (Victoria, BC). She is nêhiyaw-iskwêw and a citizen of the Métis Nation. Her poem “Wake” won PRISM international’s Earle Birney Prize in 2019. The song cycle, "The Length of a Day” (Jeffrey Ryan, composer), premiered in 2021. Her work has appeared in Arc, CV2, The Greensboro Review, Grain, Emrys Journal, Vallum, and several anthologies. A feminist activist, Michelle won a landmark human rights case establishing reasonable accommodation in the workplace for breastfeeding women. Retired from careers as a speech writer, conflict analyst, and federal treaty negotiator, she now writes full-time, enjoys the produce of her permaculture garden, and has taken up birdwatching.

"Michelle Poirier Brown’s first collection of poetry is accomplished and gripping. In her five-decade story, perceptions, denial, emotional embroilments and poignant tenderness are peeled back and examined. As the narrative builds, we encounter the sheer alchemical power of poetry. This is rare. You Might Be Sorry You Read This will change you." - Betsy Warland, Bloodroot—Tracing the Untelling of Motherloss

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